HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Emperor Xiaozong Of Song
Emperor Xiaozong of Song
Emperor Xiaozong of Song
(27 November 1127 – 28 June 1194), personal name Zhao Shen, courtesy name Yuanyong, was the 11th emperor of the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
in China and the second emperor of the Southern Song dynasty. He started his reign in 1162 when his adoptive father and predecessor, Emperor Gaozong, abdicated and passed the throne to him. Even though Emperor Gaozong became a Taishang Huang ("Retired Emperor") after his abdication, he remained the de facto ruler, so Emperor Xiaozong only fully took over the reins of power in 1187 after Emperor Gaozong's death
[...More...]

"Emperor Xiaozong Of Song" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

History Of Song
The History of Song or Song Shi (Sòng Shǐ) is one of the official Chinese historical works known as the Twenty-Four Histories of China that records the history of the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(960–1279). It was commissioned in 1343 and compiled under the direction of First Minister Toqto'a and Prime Minister Alutu (阿鲁图/阿魯圖) during the Yuan dynasty
Yuan dynasty
(1279–1368) at the same time as the History of Liao and the History of Jin
[...More...]

"History Of Song" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chinese Surname
Chinese surnames are used by Han Chinese
Han Chinese
and Sinicized ethnic groups in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Brunei, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam
Vietnam
and among overseas Chinese communities. In ancient times two types of surnames existed, namely xing (Chinese: 姓; pinyin: xìng) or clan names, and shi (Chinese: 氏; pinyin: shì) or lineage names. Chinese family names are patrilineal, passed from father to children (in adoption, the adoptee usually also takes the same surname). Women do not normally change their surnames upon marriage, except in places with more Western influences such as Hong Kong. Traditionally Chinese surnames have been exogamous.[1][2] The colloquial expressions laobaixing (老百姓; lit. "old hundred surnames") and bǎixìng (百姓, lit
[...More...]

"Chinese Surname" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Economy Of The Song Dynasty
For over three centuries during the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(960–1279) China experienced sustained growth in per capita income and population, structural change in the economy, and increased pace of technological innovation. Movable print, improved seeds for rice and other commercial crops, gunpowder, water-powered mechanical clocks, the use of coal as a source of fuel for a variety of industries, improved techniques for iron and steel production, pound locks and many other technological innovations transformed the economy. In north China, the main fuel source for ceramic kilns and iron furnaces shifted from wood to coal. During the Song dynasty, there was also a notable increase in commercial contacts with global markets. Merchants engaged in overseas trade through investments in trading vessels and trade which reached ports as far away as East Africa
[...More...]

"Economy Of The Song Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Society Of The Song Dynasty
Chinese society during the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(960–1279) was marked by political and legal reforms, a philosophical revival of Confucianism, and the development of cities beyond administrative purposes into centers of trade, industry, and maritime commerce. The inhabitants of rural areas were mostly farmers, although some were also hunters, fishers, or government employees working in mines or the salt marshes. Conversely, shopkeepers, artisans, city guards, entertainers, laborers, and wealthy merchants lived in the county and provincial centers along with the Chinese gentry—a small, elite community of educated scholars and scholar-officials. As landholders and drafted government officials, the gentry considered themselves the leading members of society; gaining their cooperation and employment was essential for the county or provincial bureaucrat overburdened with official duties
[...More...]

"Society Of The Song Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Empress Wu (Song Dynasty)
Empress Wu (18 September 1115 – 19 December 1197) was a Chinese Empress consort of the Song Dynasty, married to Emperor Gaozong of Song. She played an influential part in politics of the Southern Song dynasty, having caused the abdication of three monarchs: Emperor Gaozong in 1162, Emperor Xiaozing in 1189, and Emperor Guangzong in 1194.[1]Contents1 Life1.1 Fall of Kaifeng 1.2 Southern Song 1.3 Empress 1.4 Later life2 NotesLife[edit] Wu was the daughter of Wu Jin, a commoner in Kaifeng. At the age of fourteen, she was selected as a palace maid to Gaozong, then a Prince, and his first spouse and primary consort Xing, who had recently married. Fall of Kaifeng[edit] In 1126, Emperor Huizong abdicated in favor of his son, Emperor Qinzong, the elder brother of Gaozong. In 1127, the capital of Kaifeng was captured by the Jurchen during the Jin–Song Wars
[...More...]

"Empress Wu (Song Dynasty)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Coronation
A coronation is the act of placement or bestowal of a crown upon a monarch's head. The term generally also refers not only to the physical crowning but to the whole ceremony wherein the act of crowning occurs, along with the presentation of other items of regalia, marking the formal investiture of a monarch with regal power. Aside from the crowning, a coronation ceremony may comprise many other rituals such as the taking of special vows by the monarch, the investing and presentation of regalia to the monarch, and acts of homage by the new ruler's subjects and the performance of other ritual deeds of special significance to the particular nation. Western-style coronations have often included anointing the monarch with holy oil, or chrism as it is often called; the anointing ritual's religious significance follows examples found in the Bible
[...More...]

"Coronation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jin Dynasty (1115–1234)
The Jin dynasty, officially known as the Great Jin (/dʒɪn/),[2] lasted from 1115 to 1234 as one of the last dynasties in Chinese history to predate the Mongol invasion of China. Its name is sometimes written as Kin, Jurchen Jin or Jinn in English to differentiate it from an earlier Jìn dynasty of China
China
whose name is identical when transcribed without tone marker diacritics in the Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
system for Standard Chinese.[3] It is also sometimes called the "Jurchen dynasty" or the "Jurchen Jin", because its founding Emperor Taizu of Jin (reign 1115–1123) was of Wanyan
Wanyan
Jurchen descent. The Jin emerged from Taizu's rebellion against the Liao dynasty (907–1125), which held sway over northern China
China
until the nascent Jin drove the Liao to the Western Regions, where they became known as the Western Liao
[...More...]

"Jin Dynasty (1115–1234)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jurchen People
The Jurchen (Manchu: ᠵᡠᡧᡝᠨ jušen; Chinese: 女真, Nǚzhēn, [nỳ.ʈʂə́n]), also known by many variant names, were a Tungusic people who inhabited the region of Manchuria
Manchuria
until around 1630, at which point they were reformed and combined with their neighbors as the Manchu. The Jurchen established the Jin Dynasty, whose empire conquered the Northern Song in 1127, gaining control of most of North China. Jin control over China
China
lasted until their 1234 conquest by the Mongols
[...More...]

"Jurchen People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Technology Of The Song Dynasty
Technology
Technology
("science of craft", from Greek τέχνη, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -λογία, -logia[2]) is the collection of techniques, skills, methods, and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigation. Technology
Technology
can be the knowledge of techniques, processes, and the like, or it can be embedded in machines to allow for operation without detailed knowledge of their workings. The simplest form of technology is the development and use of basic tools. The prehistoric discovery of how to control fire and the later Neolithic Revolution
Neolithic Revolution
increased the available sources of food, and the invention of the wheel helped humans to travel in and control their environment
[...More...]

"Technology Of The Song Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Emperor Taizong Of Song
An emperor (through Old French
Old French
empereor from Latin imperator[1]) is a monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. Empress, the female equivalent, may indicate an emperor's wife (empress consort), mother (empress dowager), or a woman who rules in her own right (empress regnant). Emperors are generally recognized to be of a higher honour and rank than kings. In Europe
Europe
the title of Emperor
Emperor
has been used since the Middle Ages, considered in those times equal or almost equal in dignity to that of Pope, due to the latter's position as visible head of the Church and spiritual leader of the Catholic part of Western Europe
[...More...]

"Emperor Taizong Of Song" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jingkang Incident
The Jingkang Incident (靖康事變; Jìngkāng shì biàn), also known as the Humiliation of Jingkang (靖康之恥; Jìngkāng zhī chǐ) and the Disorders of the Jingkang Period (靖康之亂; Jìngkāng zhī luàn)[1] took place in 1127 during the Jin–Song Wars when the forces of the Jurchen-led Jin dynasty besieged and sacked Bianjing (present-day Kaifeng), the capital of the Han Chinese-led Song dynasty. The Jin forces captured the Song ruler, Emperor Qinzong, along with his father, Emperor Huizong, and many members of the imperial family and officials of the Song imperial court. This event marked the end of the era known as the Northern Song dynasty, when the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
controlled most of China
[...More...]

"Jingkang Incident" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jin–Song Wars
Jin dynasty Da Chu (1127) Da Qi (1133–37)Co-belligerents: Western Xia
Western Xia
(1225–27)Song dynastyKhitansCo-belligerents: Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire
(1211–34) Western Xia
Western Xia
(1210–19) Eastern Xia (1215–22)v t eJin–Song WarsBattles: Jingkang Huangtiandang De'an Yancheng Tangdao Caishi Caizhou Treaties: Alliance Conducted at Sea Treaty of ShaoxingMap showing the Song-Jurchen Jin warsThe Jin–Song Wars
Jin–Song Wars
were a series of conflicts between the Jurchen Jin dynasty (1115–1234) and Han Chinese
Han Chinese
Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(960–1279). In 1115, the Jurchens rebelled against their overlords, the Khitan Liao dynasty (907–1125), and declared the formation of the Jin
[...More...]

"Jin–Song Wars" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Song Dynasty
The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(/sɔːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279. It was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia
Western Xia
dynasties in the north and was conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
is divided into two distinct periods, Northern and Southern
[...More...]

"Song Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Zhao (surname)
Zhao (/dʒaʊ/; traditional Chinese: 趙; simplified Chinese: 赵; pinyin: Zhào), romanized in Taiwan
Taiwan
and Hong Kong as Chao, also elsewhere as Cho, Chiu, Tio, and various other forms, is a Chinese family name, ranking as the 7th most common surname in Mainland China and carried mainly by people of Mandarin-speaking regions
[...More...]

"Zhao (surname)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Chinese Name
Chinese personal names are names used by those from mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora
Chinese diaspora
overseas. Due to China's historical dominance of East Asian culture, many names used in Korea and Vietnam are adaptations of Chinese names, or have historical roots in Chinese, with appropriate adaptation to accommodate linguistic differences. Modern Chinese names consist of a surname known as xing (姓, xìng), which comes first and is usually but not always monosyllabic, followed by a personal name called ming (名, míng), which is nearly always mono- or disyllabic
[...More...]

"Chinese Name" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.