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Emotion
Emotion
Emotion
is any conscious experience[1][2][3] characterized by intense mental activity and a certain degree of pleasure or displeasure.[4][5] Scientific discourse has drifted to other meanings and there is no consensus on a definition. Emotion
Emotion
is often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, and motivation.[6] In some theories, cognition is an important aspect of emotion. Those acting primarily on the emotions they are feeling may seem as if they are not thinking, but mental processes are still essential, particularly in the interpretation of events. For example, the realization of our believing that we are in a dangerous situation and the subsequent arousal of our body's nervous system (rapid heartbeat and breathing, sweating, muscle tension) is integral to the experience of our feeling afraid. Other theories, however, claim that emotion is separate from and can precede cognition. Emotions are complex
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Distrust
Distrust is a formal way of not trusting any one party too much in a situation of grave risk or deep doubt. It is commonly expressed in civics as a division or balance of powers, or in politics as means of validating treaty terms. Systems based on distrust simply divide the responsibility so that checks and balances can operate. The phrase "Trust, but verify" refers specifically to distrust. An electoral system or adversarial process inevitably is based on distrust, but not on mistrust. Parties compete in the system, but they do not compete to subvert the system itself, or gain bad faith advantage through it - if they do they are easily caught by the others. Much mistrust does exist between parties, and it is exactly this which motivates putting in place a formal system of distrust. Diplomatic protocol for instance, which applies between states, relies on such means as formal disapproval which in effect say "we do not trust that person"
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Depression (mood)
Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity that can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, feelings, and sense of well-being. A depressed mood is a normal temporary reaction to life events such as loss of a loved one. It is also a symptom of some physical diseases and a side effect of some drugs and medical treatments. Depressed mood is also a symptom of some mood disorders such as major depressive disorder or dysthymia.[1] People with a depressed mood may be notably sad, anxious, or empty; they may also feel notably hopeless, helpless, dejected, or worthless. Other symptoms expressed may include senses of guilt, irritability, or anger.[2][3] Further feelings expressed by these individuals may include feeling ashamed or an expressed restlessness. These individuals may notably lose interest in activities that they once considered pleasurable or experience either loss of appetite or overeating
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Confidence
Confidence has a common meaning of a certainty about handling something, such as work, family, social events, or relationships.[1] Some have ascribed confidence as a state of being certain either that a hypothesis or prediction is correct or that a chosen course of action is the best or most effective. Self-confidence is having confidence in one's self. Arrogance or hubris in this comparison is having unmerited confidence – believing something or someone is capable or correct when they are not. Overconfidence or presumptuousness is excessive belief in someone (or something) succeeding, without any regard for failure. Confidence can be a self-fulfilling prophecy as those without it may fail or not try because they lack it and those with it may succeed because they have it rather than because of an innate ability
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Joy
The word joy means a feeling of great pleasure and happiness.[1] C. S. Lewis
C. S. Lewis
saw clear distinction between joy and pleasure and happiness; "I sometimes wonder whether all pleasures are not substitutes for Joy."[2], and "I call it Joy, which is here a technical term and must be sharply distinguished both from Happiness and Pleasure. Joy
Joy
(in my sense) has indeed one characteristic, and one only, in common with them; the fact that anyone who has experienced it will want it again... I doubt whether anyone who has tasted it would ever, if both were in his power, exchange it for all the pleasures in the world. But then Joy
Joy
is never in our power and Pleasure
Pleasure
often is."[3] The causes of joy have been ascribed to various sources
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Anticipation
Anticipation
Anticipation
is an emotion involving pleasure, excitement, or anxiety in considering an expected event.[attribution needed] Anticipation
Anticipation
is the process of imaginative speculation about the future. The brain uses information about gravity, curvature, obstacles etc. to make a prediction.Contents1 As a defence mechanism 2 Desire 3 In music 4 In phenomenology 5 In pop culture 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksAs a defence mechanism[edit] Robin Skynner considered anticipation as one of "the mature ways of dealing with real stress...
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Courage
Courage
Courage
(also called bravery or valour) is the choice and willingness to confront agony, pain, danger, uncertainty, or intimidation. Physical courage is bravery in the face of physical pain, hardship, death or threat of death, while moral courage is the ability to act rightly in the face of popular opposition, shame, scandal, discouragement, or personal loss. The classical virtue of fortitude (andreia, fortitudo) is also translated "courage", but includes the aspects of perseverance and patience.[1] In the Western tradition, notable thoughts on courage have come from philosophers, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, and Kierkegaard; in the Eastern tradition, some thoughts on courage were offered by the Tao Te Ching
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Apathy
Apathy
Apathy
is a lack of feeling, emotion, interest, and concern. Apathy
Apathy
is a state of indifference, or the suppression of emotions such as concern, excitement, motivation, or passion. An apathetic individual has an absence of interest in or concern about emotional, social, spiritual, philosophical, or physical life and the world. The apathetic may lack a sense of purpose, worth, or meaning in their life. An apathetic person may also exhibit insensibility or sluggishness. In positive psychology, apathy is described as a result of the individuals feeling they do not possess the level of skill required to confront a challenge (i.e. "flow"). It may also be a result of perceiving no challenge at all (e.g. the challenge is irrelevant to them, or conversely, they have learned helplessness). Apathy
Apathy
may be a sign of more specific mental problems such as schizophrenia or dementia
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Grief
Grief
Grief
is a multifaceted response to loss, particularly to the loss of someone or something that has died, to which a bond or affection was formed. Although conventionally focused on the emotional response to loss, it also has physical, cognitive, behavioral, social, cultural, spiritual and philosophical dimensions. While the terms are often used interchangeably, bereavement refers to the state of loss, and grief is the reaction to that loss. Grief
Grief
is a natural response to loss
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Lust
Lust
Lust
is a craving, it can take any form such as the lust for sexuality, lust for money or the lust for power. It can take such mundane forms as the lust for food as distinct from the need for food. Lust
Lust
is a psychological force producing intense wanting for an object, or circumstance fulfilling the emotion.[1]Contents1 In religion1.1 Buddhism 1.2 Christianity1.2.1 New Testament 1.2.2 Catholicism1.3 Hinduism1.3.1 Brahma Kumaris1.4 Islam 1.5 Judaism 1.6 Paganism 1.7 Sikhism 1.8 Meher Baba's teachings2 In culture2.1 Medieval prostitutes3 In art3.1 Literature4 In philosophy4.1 Schopenhauer 4.2 St
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Interest (emotion)
Interest is a feeling or emotion[1] that causes attention to focus on an object, event, or process. In contemporary psychology of interest,[2] the term is used as a general concept that may encompass other more specific psychological terms, such as curiosity and to a much lesser degree surprise.[citation needed] The emotion of interest does have its own facial expression, of which the most prominent component is having dilated pupils.[3]Contents1 Applications in computer assisted communication and B-C interface 2 Measurement of sexual interest 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksApplications in computer assisted communication and B-C interface[edit] In 2016, an entirely new communication device and brain-computer interface was revealed, which required no visual fixation or eye movement at all, as with previous such devices. Instead, the device assesses more covert interest, that is by assessing other indicators than eye fixation, on a chosen letter on a virtual keyboard
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Hatred
Hatred or hate is a deep and extreme emotional dislike, especially invoking feelings of anger or resentment. It can be directed against individuals, groups, entities, objects, behaviors, or ideas. Hatred is often associated with feelings of anger, disgust and a disposition towards hostility.Contents1 Ethnolinguistics 2 Psychoanalytic views 3 Neurological research 4 Legal issues 5 Religious perspectives5.1 Christianity6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingEthnolinguistics[edit]This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article possibly contains original research
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Boredom
In conventional usage, boredom is an emotional or psychological state experienced when an individual is left without anything in particular to do, is not interested in his or her surroundings, or feels that a day or period is dull or tedious. It is also understood by scholars as a modern phenomenon which has a cultural dimension. "There is no universally accepted definition of boredom. But whatever it is, researchers argue, it is not simply another name for depression or apathy
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Anguish
Anguish
Anguish
is a term used in philosophy, often as a translation from the Latin for angst. It is a paramount feature of existentialist philosophy, in which anguish is often understood as the experience of an utterly free being in a world with zero absolutes (existential despair). In the theology of Kierkegaard, it refers to a being with total free will who is in a constant state of spiritual fear that his freedom will lead him to fall short of the standards that God has laid out for them.Overview[edit] Kierkegaard views anguish as the same as suffering. Everyone wants to find the "truth" but it takes anguish and suffering to "appropriate" the truth
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Pity
Pity
Pity
is a sympathetic sorrow evoked by the suffering of others and is used in a comparable sense to compassion, condolence or empathy. Through frequent, insincere, pejorative usage, it is used to connote feelings of superiority, condescension, or contempt.[1]Contents1 History 2 Neurological perspectives 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit]Alexander sees with a look of pity that Darius has died from his wounds.The Human Abstract, a poem in William Blake's collection Songs of Innocence and of Experience, in which he proclaims " Pity
Pity
would be no more, / If we did not make somebody Poor" (1-2). This version is copy L created in 1795 and currently held by the Yale Center for British Art.[2]The word pity comes from the Latin pietās, that is also etymon of piety. The word is often used in the translations from ancient Greek into English of Aristotle's Poetics and Rhetoric
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Contentment
Contentment
Contentment
is a mental or emotional state of satisfaction maybe drawn from being at ease in one's situation, body and mind. Colloquially speaking, contentment could be a state of having accepted one's situation and is a milder and more tentative form of happiness.[1] Contentment
Contentment
and the pursuit of contentment are possibly a central thread through many philosophical or religious schools across diverse cultures, times and geographies. Siddharta might have said "Health is the most precious gain and contentment the greatest wealth". John Stuart Mill, centuries later, would write "I have learned to seek my happiness by limiting my desires, rather than in attempting to satisfy them." Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
wrote "Live with the gods
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