HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







Emeritus Professor
Emeritus (/əˈmɛrɪtəs/; female: Emerita),[Note 1] in its current usage, is an adjective used to designate a retired chair, professor, pastor, bishop, pope, director, president, prime minister, rabbi, emperor, or other person who has been "permitted to retain as an honorary title the rank of the last office held".[1] Like the Romance languages derived from it, Latin contains many words that are gender-specific; "emeritus" is used for a male, "emerita" for a female. In some cases, the term is conferred automatically upon all persons who retire at a given rank, but in others, it remains a mark of distinguished service, awarded only to a few on retirement. It is also used when a person of distinction in a profession retires or hands over the position, enabling their former rank to be retained in their title, e.g., "professor emeritus"
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Sobriquet
A sobriquet (/ˈsbrɪk/ SOH-bri-kay), or soubriquet, is a nickname, sometimes assumed, but often given by another, that is descriptive in nature. Distinct from a pseudonym, a sobriquet is typically a familiar name used in place of a real name, without the need of explanation, often becoming more familiar than the original name. The term sobriquet may apply to the nickname for a specific person, group of people, or place. Examples are Emiye Menelik, a name of Emperor Menelik II of Ethiopia, who was popularly and affectionately recognized for his kindness ("emiye" means "mother" in Amharic); Genghis Khan, who now is rarely recognized by his original name Temüjin; and Mohandas Gandhi, who is better known as Mahatma Gandhi ("mahatma" means "great soul" in Sanskrit and Hindi)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Diminutive
A diminutive is a root word that has been modified to convey a slighter degree of its root meaning, to convey the smallness of the object or quality named, or to convey a sense of intimacy or endearment.[1][2] A diminutive form (abbreviated DIM) is a word-formation device used to express such meanings. In many languages, such forms can be translated as "little" and diminutives can also be formed as multi-word constructions such as "Tiny Tim". Diminutives are often employed as nicknames and pet names when speaking to small children and when expressing extreme tenderness and intimacy to an adult. The opposite of the diminutive form is the augmentative
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Mononymous Person
A mononymous person is an individual who is known and addressed by a single name, or mononym.[a][b] In some cases, that name has been selected by the individual, who may have originally been given a polynym ("multiple name"). In other cases, it has been determined by the custom of the country[c] or by some interested segment. In the case of historical figures, it may be the only one of the individual's names that has survived and is still known today. The structure of persons' names has varied across time and geography. In some societies, individuals have been mononymous, receiving only a single name. Alulim, first king of Sumer, is one of the earliest names known; Narmer, an ancient Egyptian pharaoh, is another. In addition, Biblical names were typically mononymous, as were names in the surrounding cultures of the Fertile Crescent
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Toponymy
Toponymy, also toponymics or toponomastics (from Ancient Greek: τόπος / tópos, 'place', and ὄνομα / onoma, 'name') is the study of toponyms (proper names of places), their origins and meanings, use and typology.[1][2][3] In a more specific sense, the term toponymy refers to an inventory of toponyms, while the discipline researching such names is referred to as toponymics or toponomastics.[4] Toponymy is a branch of onomastics, the study of proper names of all kinds.[5] A person who studies toponymy is called toponymist. Toponym is the general term for a proper name of any geographical feature,[6] and full scope of the term also includes proper names of all cosmographical features.[7] According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word toponymy first appeared in English in 1876
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]