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Elizabeth Tower
BIG BEN is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London and is usually extended to refer to both the clock and the clock tower as well. The tower is officially known as ELIZABETH TOWER, renamed to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 2012; previously, it was known simply as the CLOCK TOWER. When completed in 1859, it was, says clockmaker Ian Westworth, “the prince of timekeepers: the biggest, most accurate four-faced striking and chiming clock in the world.” The tower had its 150th anniversary on 31 May 2009, during which celebratory events took place. A British cultural icon , the tower is one of the most prominent symbols of the United Kingdom and is often in the establishing shot of films set in London
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Big Ben (other)
BIG BEN (officially the Elizabeth Tower) is a clock tower in the Palace of Westminster in London, England
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Palace Of Westminster
The PALACE OF WESTMINSTER is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords , the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom . Commonly known as the HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT after its occupants, the Palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the City of Westminster , in central London . Its name, which is derived from the neighbouring Westminster Abbey , may refer to either of two structures: the _Old Palace_, a medieval building complex destroyed by fire in 1834 , and its replacement, the _New Palace_ that stands today. The palace is owned by the monarch in right of the Crown and for ceremonial purposes, retains its original status as a royal residence. The building is managed by committees appointed by both houses, which report to the Speaker of the House of Commons and the Lord Speaker . The first royal palace was built on the site in the 11th century, and Westminster was the primary residence of the Kings of England until fire destroyed much of the complex in 1512. After that, it served as the home of the Parliament of England , which had been meeting there since the 13th century, and also as the seat of the Royal Courts of Justice , based in and around Westminster Hall
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Tower
A TOWER is a tall structure , taller than it is wide, often by a significant margin. Towers are distinguished from masts by their lack of guy-wires and are therefore, along with tall buildings, self-supporting structures. Towers are specifically distinguished from "buildings " in that they are not built to be habitable but to serve other functions. The principal function is the use of their height to enable various functions to be achieved including: visibility of other features attached to the tower such clock towers ; as part of a larger structure or device to increase the visibility of the surroundings for defensive purposes as in a fortified building such as a castle ; or as a structure for observation for leisure purposes; or as a structure for telecommunication purposes. Towers can be stand alone structures or be supported by adjacent buildings or can be a feature on top of a large structure or building. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 History * 3 Mechanics * 4 Functions * 4.1 Strategic advantages * 4.2 Potential energy * 4.3 Communication enhancement * 4.4 Transportation support * 4.5 Other towers * 5 Gallery * 6 See also * 6.1 General * 6.2 Towers in warfare * 7 References * 8 Further reading ETYMOLOGY Old English torr is from Latin turris via Old French tor
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Gothic Revival
GOTHIC REVIVAL (also referred to as VICTORIAN GOTHIC, NEO-GOTHIC or JIGSAW GOTHIC, and when used for school, college, and university buildings as COLLEGIATE GOTHIC) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England. Its popularity grew rapidly in the early 19th century, when increasingly serious and learned admirers of neo-Gothic styles sought to revive medieval Gothic architecture , in contrast to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time. Gothic Revival draws features from the original Gothic style, including decorative patterns, finials , scalloping, lancet windows , hood mouldings, and label stops. CONTENTS * 1 Roots * 2 Survival and revival * 2.1 Decorative * 3 Romanticism and nationalism * 4 Gothic as a moral force * 4.1 Pugin and "truth" in architecture * 4.2 Ruskin and Venetian Gothic * 4.3 Ecclesiology and funerary style * 5 Viollet-le-Duc and Iron Gothic * 6 Collegiate Gothic * 7 Vernacular adaptations * 8 20th century * 9 Appreciation * 10 Details of architectural elements * 11 Gallery * 11.1 Asia * 11.2 Europe * 11.3 North America * 11.4 South America * 11.5 Africa * 12 See also * 13 Notes * 14 Further reading * 15 External links ROOTSThe Gothic Revival movement emerged in 19th-century England
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London
LONDON /ˈlʌndən/ ( listen ) is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom . Standing on the River Thames in the south east of the island of Great Britain , London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans , who named it _ Londinium _. London's ancient core, the City of London
City of London
, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries. Since at least the 19th century, "London" has also referred to the metropolis around this core, historically split between Middlesex , Essex , Surrey , Kent , and Hertfordshire , which today largely makes up Greater London
Greater London
, a region governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly . London is a leading global city in the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism, and transportation. It is crowned as the world's largest financial centre and has the fifth- or sixth-largest metropolitan area GDP in the world . London is a world cultural capital. It is the world's most-visited city as measured by international arrivals and has the world\'s largest city airport system measured by passenger traffic
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England
ENGLAND is a country that is part of the United Kingdom . It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain (which lies in the North Atlantic ) in its centre and south; and includes over 100 smaller islands such as the Isles of Scilly , and the Isle of Wight . The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles , one of the Germanic tribes who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery , which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language , the Anglican Church , and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations
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Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
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Augustus Pugin
AUGUSTUS WELBY NORTHMORE PUGIN (1 March 1812 – 14 September 1852) was an English architect , designer, artist, and critic who is principally remembered for his pioneering role in the Gothic Revival style of architecture . His work culminated in designing the interior of the Palace of Westminster
Palace of Westminster
in Westminster
Westminster
, London
London
, England
England
. Pugin designed many churches in England
England
and some in Ireland
Ireland
and Australia
Australia
. He was the son of Auguste Pugin , and the father of Edward Welby and Peter Paul Pugin , who continued his architectural firm as Pugin "> The Grange, Ramsgate
Ramsgate
, Thanet
Thanet
, Kent
Kent
, England
England
, designed by Pugin as his family home Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Cathedral Basilica of St. Chad in Birmingham
Birmingham
, England
England
The northeast chapel of St
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Bell
A BELL is a directly struck idiophone percussion instrument . Most bells have the shape of a hollow cup that when struck vibrates in a single strong strike tone , with its sides forming an efficient resonator . The strike may be made by an internal "clapper" or "uvula", an external hammer, or—in small bells—by a small loose sphere enclosed within the body of the bell. Bells are usually cast from bell metal (a type of bronze ) for its resonant properties, but can also be made from other hard materials; this depends on the function. Some small bells such as ornamental bells or cow bells can be made from cast or pressed metal, glass or ceramic, but large bells such as church, clock and tower bells are normally cast from bell metal. Bells intended to be heard over a wide area can range from a single bell hung in a turret or bell-gable , to a musical ensemble such as an English ring of bells , a carillon or a Russian zvon which are tuned to a common scale and installed in a bell tower . Many public or institutional buildings house bells, most commonly as clock bells to sound the hours and quarters. Historically, bells have been associated with religious rituals, and are still used to call communities together for religious services. Later, bells were made to commemorate important events or people and have been associated with the concepts of peace and freedom. The study of bells is called campanology
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CLOCK
4H10 IDENTIFIERS ALIASES CLOCK, KAT13D, bHLHe8, clock circadian regulator EXTERNAL IDS OMIM: 601851 MGI: 99698 HomoloGene: 3603 GeneCards: CLOCK GENE ONTOLOGY MOLECULAR FUNCTION • transferase activity • DNA binding • sequence-specific DNA binding • protein dimerization activity • core promoter binding • transcription factor activity, sequence-specific DNA binding • histone acetyltransferase activity • RNA polymerase II core promoter proximal region sequence-specific DNA binding • transcriptional activator activity, RNA polymerase II transcription factor binding • transcription factor activity, RNA polymerase II core promoter proximal region sequence-specific binding • E-box binding • core promoter sequence-specific DNA binding • protein binding • chromatin DNA binding • transferase activity, transferring acyl groups CELLULAR COMPONENT • cytoplasm • chromatoid body • intracellular membrane-bounded organelle • transcription factor complex • chromosome • nucleoplasm • nucleus BIOLOGICAL PROCESS • negative regulation of glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway • positive regulation of inflammatory response • regulation of transcription, DNA-templated • photoperiodism • regulation of insulin secretion • rhythm
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Clock Tower
CLOCK TOWERS are a specific type of building which houses a turret clock and has one or more clock faces on the upper exterior walls. Many clock towers are freestanding structures but they can also adjoin or be located on top of another building. Clock towers are a common sight in many parts of the world with some being iconic buildings. One example is the Elizabeth Tower in London (sometimes erroneously called ' Big Ben ', although this name belongs only to the bell inside the tower). CONTENTS * 1 Definition * 2 History * 3 Landmarks * 4 Records * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links DEFINITIONThere are many structures which may have clocks or clock faces attached to them and some structures have had clocks added to an existing structure. According to the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat a building is defined as a building if at least fifty percent of its height is made up of floor plates containing habitable floor area. Structures that do not meet this criterion, are defined as towers . A CLOCK TOWER historically fits this definition of a tower and therefore can be defined as any tower specifically built with one or more (often four) clock faces and that can be either freestanding or part of a church or municipal building such as a town hall . Not all clocks on buildings therefore make the building into a clock tower. The mechanism inside the tower is known as a turret clock
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Diamond Jubilee Of Elizabeth II
The DIAMOND JUBILEE OF QUEEN ELIZABETH II was a multinational celebration throughout 2012, that marked the 60th anniversary of the accession of Queen Elizabeth II on 6 February 1952. Queen Elizabeth is queen regnant of 16 sovereign states, known as Commonwealth realms , including the United Kingdom. The only other time in British history that a monarch celebrated a Diamond Jubilee was in 1897, when Queen Victoria celebrated hers. Commemorative events were held throughout the Commonwealth of Nations . Unlike the Queen's Silver and Golden Jubilees , when the Queen toured most of her realms around the world, Elizabeth II and her husband Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh , toured only the United Kingdom. Other parts of the Commonwealth were toured by her children and grandchildren as her representatives
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Chime (bell Instrument)
A carillon -like instrument with less than 23 bells is called a CHIME. American chimes usually have one to one and a half diatonic octaves . Many chimes are automated. The first bell chime was created in 1487. Before 1900, chime bells typically lacked dynamic variation and the inner tuning (the mathematical balance of a bell's complex sound) required to permit the use of harmony. Since then, chime bells produced in Belgium
Belgium
, the Netherlands
Netherlands
, England, and America have inner tuning and can produce fully harmonized music. Some towers in England
England
hung for full circle change ringing chime by an Ellacombe apparatus . NOTABLE CHIMES * The Arma Sifton bells at the International Peace Garden , North Dakota , United States
United States
. The 14 bells by Gillett "> * ^ Bell Facts – Bell Chimes Archived August 13, 2006, at the Wayback Machine . * ^ bell ringing glossary * ^ A HISTORY OF THE INTERNATIONAL PEACE GARDEN * ^ "Cape Breton Post: Video
Video
of Sydney woman playing former church\'s chimes goes viral". Cape Breton Post. Retrieved April 18, 2016. * ^ "Videos of Coxheath’s Glenda Watt making music with the bells go viral". Chronicle Herald. Retrieved April 18, 2016. * ^ "Sydney woman playing chimes goes viral on Facebook". CBC News. Retrieved April 18, 2016
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Culture Of The United Kingdom
The CULTURE OF THE UNITED KINGDOM is influenced by the UK\'s history as a developed island country , a liberal democracy and a major power ; its predominantly Christian religious life ; and its composition of four countries — England , Wales , Scotland and Northern Ireland —each of which has distinct customs, cultures and symbolism . The wider culture of Europe has also influenced British culture, and Humanism , Protestantism and representative democracy developed from broader Western culture . British literature , music , cinema , art , theatre , comedy , media , television , philosophy , architecture and education are important aspects of British culture. The United Kingdom is also prominent in science and technology, producing world-leading scientists (e.g. Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin ) and inventions. Sport is an important part of British culture; numerous sports originated in the country, including football . The UK has been described as a "cultural superpower", and London has been described as a world cultural capital. The Industrial Revolution , which started in the UK, had a profound effect on the socio-economic and cultural conditions of the world
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Establishing Shot
An ESTABLISHING SHOT in filmmaking and television production sets up, or establishes the context for a scene by showing the relationship between its important figures and objects. It is generally a long or extreme-long shot at the beginning of a scene indicating where, and sometimes when, the remainder of the scene takes place. Establishing shots were more common during the classical era of filmmaking than they are now. Today's filmmakers tend to skip the establishing shot in order to move the scene along more quickly. In addition, the expositional nature of the shot (as described above) may be unsuitable to scenes in mysteries, where details are intentionally obscured or left out. USE OF ESTABLISHING SHOTS Location Establishing shots may use famous landmarks to indicate the city where the action is taking place or has moved to, such as the Brandenburg Gate to identify Berlin , Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty to identify New York City , the London Eye or Big Ben (officially known as Elizabeth Tower) to identify London , the Sydney Opera House or the Harbour Bridge to identify Sydney , the Hollywood Sign to indicate Los Angeles , the Eiffel Tower and/or the Arc de Triomphe to identify Paris , or the Las Vegas Strip to identify Las Vegas
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