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Elizabeth Tower
Big Ben
Big Ben
is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster
Westminster
in London[1] and is usually extended to refer to both the clock and the clock tower.[2][3] The official name of the tower in which Big Ben
Big Ben
is located was originally the Clock Tower, but it was renamed Elizabeth Tower in 2012 to mark the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II. The tower was designed by Augustus Pugin
Augustus Pugin
in a neo-gothic style. When completed in 1859, it was, says horologist Ian Westworth, "the prince of timekeepers: the biggest, most accurate four-faced striking and chiming clock in the world".[4] It stands 315 feet (96 m) tall, and the climb from ground level to the belfry is 334 steps. Its base is square, measuring 39 feet (12 m) on each side. Dials of the clock are 23 feet (7.0 m) in diameter
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Big Ben (other)
Disambiguation usually refers to word-sense disambiguation, the process of identifying which meaning of a word is used in context. Disambiguation may also refer to:Sentence boundary disambiguation, the problem in natural language processing of deciding where sentences begin and end Syntactic disambiguation, the problem of resolving syntactic ambiguity Memory disambiguation, a set of microprocessor execution techniquesMusic[edit]Ø (Disambiguation), a 2010 album by Underoath Disambiguation (Pandelis Karayorgis album), a 2002 album by Pandelis Karayorgis and Mat ManeriSee also[edit]Ambiguity, an attribute of any concept, idea, statement or claim whose meaning, intention or interpretation cannot be definitively resolvedThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Disambiguation. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Cast Iron
Cast iron
Cast iron
is a group of iron-carbon alloys with a carbon content greater than 2%.[1] Its usefulness derives from its relatively low melting temperature. The alloy constituents affect its colour when fractured: white cast iron has carbide impurities which allow cracks to pass straight through, grey cast iron has graphite flakes which deflect a passing crack and initiate countless new cracks as the material breaks, and ductile cast iron has spherical graphite "nodules" which stop the crack from further progressing. Carbon
Carbon
(C) ranging from 1.8–4 wt%, and silicon (Si) 1–3 wt% are the main alloying elements of cast iron. Iron alloys with lower carbon content (~0.8%) are known as steel. While this technically makes the Fe–C–Si system ternary, the principle of cast iron solidification can be understood from the simpler binary iron–carbon phase diagram
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New Year's Eve
In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve
New Year's Eve
(also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day
Saint Sylvester's Day
in many countries), the last day of the year, is on December 31 which is the seventh day of Christmastide. In many countries, New Year's Eve
New Year's Eve
is celebrated at evening social gatherings, where many people dance, eat, drink alcoholic beverages, and watch or light fireworks to mark the new year. Some Christians attend a watchnight service
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Remembrance Sunday
Remembrance Sunday
Remembrance Sunday
is held in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the Commonwealth of Nations as a day "to commemorate the contribution of British and Commonwealth military and civilian servicemen and women in the two World Wars and later conflicts".[1] It is held on the second Sunday in November, the Sunday nearest to 11 November, Armistice Day,[2] the anniversary of the end of hostilities in the First World War
First World War
at 11 a.m
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Gary O'Donoghue
Gary O'Donoghue is an English journalist, currently working for BBC News as their Washington, D.C. political correspondent.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Gary O'Donoghue's father was a semi-professional football player who also worked as a taxi driver, and his mother taught ballroom dancing. O'Donoghue was born partially sighted, but went totally blind by the time he was eight.[1] He was educated at Worcester College for the Blind (then a boys' boarding school though it has since merged with the similar girls' school),[2] where he played blind football for England
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Scarisbrick Hall
Scarisbrick
Scarisbrick
Hall is a country house situated just to the south-east of the village of Scarisbrick
Scarisbrick
in Lancashire, England.Contents1 History 2 Filming location 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Scarisbrick
Scarisbrick
Hall was the ancestral home of the Scarisbrick
Scarisbrick
family and dates back to the time of King Stephen (1135–1154).[1] The Scarisbrick
Scarisbrick
family lived on the site from 1238 until the house was sold in 1946 to become a training college.[2] Parts of the present building, which is considered to be one of the finest examples of Victorian Gothic
Victorian Gothic
architecture in England, were designed by the architect Augustus Pugin
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Lancashire
Lancashire
Lancashire
(/ˈlæŋkəʃər/ LANG-kə-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer or, locally, [ˈɫaŋkɪʃə(ɻ)];[2] abbreviated Lancs.) is a county in north west England. The county town is Lancaster although the administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire
Lancashire
are known as Lancastrians. The history of Lancashire
Lancashire
begins with its founding in the 12th century. In the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086, some of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire
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Gothic Revival Architecture
Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic or neo-Gothic) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England. Its popularity grew rapidly in the early 19th century, when increasingly serious and learned admirers of neo-Gothic styles sought to revive medieval Gothic architecture, in contrast to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time
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Anston
Anston
Anston
is a civil parish in South Yorkshire, England, formally known as North and South Anston
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Cladding (construction)
It has been suggested that this be merged with Siding
Siding
(see talk page).An example of claddingCladding is the application of one material over another to provide a skin or layer. In construction, cladding is used to provide a degree of thermal insulation and weather resistance, and to improve the appearance of buildings.[1] Cladding can be made of any of a wide range of materials including wood, metal, brick, vinyl, and composite materials that can include aluminium, wood, blends of cement and recycled polystyrene, wheat/rice straw fibres.[2] Rainscreen
Rainscreen
cladding is a form of weather cladding designed to protect against the elements, but also offers thermal insulation. The cladding does not itself need to be waterproof, merely a control element: it may serve only to direct water or wind safely away in order to control run-off and prevent its infiltration into the building structure
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Westminster Bridge
Coordinates: 51°30′03″N 0°07′19″W / 51.50083°N 0.12194°W / 51.50083; -0.12194 Westminster
Westminster
Bridge Westminster
Westminster
BridgeCoordinates 51°30′03″N 0°07′19″W / 51.5008°N 0.1219°W / 51.5008; -0.1219Coordinates: 51°30′03″N 0°07′19″W / 51.5008°N 0.1219°W / 51.5008; -0.1219Carries A302 roadCrosses River ThamesLocale LondonHeritage status Grade II* listed structurePreceded by Lambeth
Lambeth
BridgeFollowed by Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee BridgesCharacteristicsDesign Arch bridgeTotal length 820 feet (250 m)Width 85 feet (26 m)No
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Grade I Listed Building
A listed building or listed structure is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England
Historic England
in England, Historic Environment Scotland
Historic Environment Scotland
in Scotland, Cadw
Cadw
in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland. The term has also been used in Ireland, where buildings are surveyed for the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
in accordance with the country's obligations under the Granada Convention. However, the preferred term in Ireland is protected structure.[1] A listed building may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority, which typically consults the relevant central government agency, particularly for significant alterations to the more notable listed buildings
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Jubilee Line
The Jubilee line is a London Underground line that runs between Stratford in east London and Stanmore in the suburban north-west, via the Docklands, South Bank and West End. Opened in 1979, it is the newest line on the network, although some sections of track date back to 1932 and some stations to 1879. The western portion beyond Baker Street was previously a branch of the Bakerloo line, while the new build was completed in two major sections: initially in 1979 to Charing Cross, then in 1999 with an extension to Stratford
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London Eye
The London Eye
London Eye
is a giant Ferris wheel
Ferris wheel
on the South Bank
South Bank
of the River Thames in London. The structure is 443 feet (135 m) tall and the wheel has a diameter of 394 feet (120 m). When it opened to the public in 2000 it was the world's tallest Ferris wheel. Its height was surpassed by the 525-foot (160 m) Star of Nanchang
Star of Nanchang
in 2006, the 541-foot (165 m) Singapore Flyer
Singapore Flyer
in 2008, and the 550-foot (167.6 m) High Roller (Las Vegas) in 2014
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Parliament Square
Parliament Square
Parliament Square
is a square at the northwest end of the Palace of Westminster in central London. It features a large open green area in the centre with trees to its west, and it contains eleven statues of statesmen and other notable individuals. As well as being one of London's main tourist attractions, it is also the place where many demonstrations and protests have been held
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