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Elizabeth Tower
BIG BEN is the nickname for the Great Bell
Bell
of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster
Palace of Westminster
in London
London
and is usually extended to refer to both the clock and the clock tower as well. The tower is officially known as ELIZABETH TOWER, renamed to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
in 2012; previously, it was known simply as the CLOCK TOWER. When completed in 1859, it was, says clockmaker Ian Westworth, “the prince of timekeepers: the biggest, most accurate four-faced striking and chiming clock in the world.” The tower had its 150th anniversary on 31 May 2009, during which celebratory events took place. A British cultural icon , the tower is one of the most prominent symbols of the United Kingdom and is often in the establishing shot of films set in London
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The Daily Telegraph
THE DAILY TELEGRAPH, commonly referred to simply as THE TELEGRAPH, is a national British daily broadsheet newspaper published in London
London
by Telegraph Media Group and distributed across the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and internationally. It was founded by Arthur B. Sleigh in 1855 as The Daily Telegraph and Courier. The Telegraph is widely regarded as a national "newspaper of record " and it maintains an international reputation for quality, having been described by the BBC
BBC
as being "one of the world's great titles". The paper's motto, "Was, is, and will be", appears in the editorial pages and has featured in every edition of the newspaper since 19 April 1858. The paper had a circulation of 458,487 in November 2017, having declined following industry trends from 1.4 million in 1980
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Welsh Language
'Cymraeg' pronounced REGION Spoken throughout Wales, and in Chubut province of Argentina NATIVE SPEAKERS All UK speakers : 700,000+ (2012) * Wales
Wales
: 562,016 speakers (19.0% of the population of Wales), (data from 2011 Census); All skills (speaking, reading, or writing): 630,062 language users (reference) * England
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Parliament Of The United Kingdom
HM GOVERNMENT * Conservative Party (248)CONFIDENCE AND SUPPLY * Democratic Unionist Party (3)HM MOST LOYAL OPPOSITION * Labour Party (197)OTHER OPPOSITION * Liberal Democrats (100) * Non-affiliated (26) * UKIP (3) * Ind. Labour (2) * Ulster Unionist Party
Ulster Unionist Party
(2) * Green Party (1) * Ind. Social Democrat (1) * Ind
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Elizabeth II
ELIZABETH II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926) has been Queen of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
, Canada
Canada
, Australia
Australia
, and New Zealand since 6 February 1952. Additionally, she is Head of the Commonwealth and queen of 12 countries that have become independent since her accession: Jamaica
Jamaica
, Barbados
Barbados
, the Bahamas , Grenada
Grenada
, Papua New Guinea , Solomon Islands
Solomon Islands
, Tuvalu
Tuvalu
, Saint Lucia
Saint Lucia
, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines , Belize
Belize
, Antigua and Barbuda , and Saint Kitts and Nevis
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Prime Minister Of The United Kingdom
The PRIME MINISTER OF THE UNITED KINGDOM is the head of Her Majesty\'s Government in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
. The Prime Minister (sometimes informally abbreviated to PM) and Cabinet (consisting of all the most senior ministers , most of whom are government department heads) are collectively accountable for their policies and actions to the Monarch , to Parliament , to their political party and ultimately to the electorate . The office is one of the Great Offices of State . The current holder of the office, Theresa May
Theresa May
, leader of the Conservative Party , was appointed by the Queen on 13 July 2016
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St Stephen's Tower
STEPHENS is a surname. It is a patronymic and is recorded in England from 1086. Notable people with the surname include: * Alexander Stephens (1812–1883), Vice President of the Confederate States of America * Alison Stephens (1970–2010), British mandolinist * Ann S. Stephens (1813–1886), U.S. dime novelist * Anne Stephens (WRAF officer) (1912–2000), director of the Women's Royal Air Force * Arran Stephens (born 1944), Canadian author "> * ^ http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/StephensSEE ALSO * Stephan (surname) * Stephans * Stephen (surname) * St. Stephens (other) * Stevens (other) * Stevenson * Stephenson * Stephens Inc. This page lists people with the surname STEPHENS
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Queen Victoria
VICTORIA (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India . Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn , the fourth son of King George III
King George III
. Both the Duke of Kent and King George III
King George III
died in 1820, and Victoria was raised under close supervision by her German-born mother, Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld . She inherited the throne at the age of 18, after her father's three elder brothers had all died, leaving no surviving legitimate children. The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
was already an established constitutional monarchy , in which the sovereign held relatively little direct political power
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Anston
ANSTON is a civil parish in South Yorkshire , England, formally known as NORTH AND SOUTH ANSTON. The parish consists of the settlements of NORTH ANSTON and SOUTH ANSTON, divided by the Anston Brook. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 North Anston * 2.1 Public transport * 3 South Anston * 4 Governance * 5 Sport * 6 References * 7 External links HISTORYAnston, first recorded as Anestan is from the Old English āna stān, meaning "single or solitary stone". In the Domesday Book (1086) North and South Anston (Anestan and Litelanstan) were both held by Roger de Busli . South Anston was an ancient parish in the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill in the West Riding of Yorkshire . It was a large parish, also known as Anston cum Membris, which also included North Anston and the township of Woodsetts
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Cladding (construction)
CLADDING is the application of one material over another to provide a skin or layer. In construction , cladding is used to provide a degree of thermal insulation and weather resistance , and to improve the appearance of buildings. Cladding can be made of any of a wide range of materials including wood, metal, brick, vinyl , and composite materials that can include aluminium, wood, blends of cement and recycled polystyrene , wheat/rice straw fibres. Rainscreen cladding is a form of weather cladding designed to protect against the elements, but also offers thermal insulation. The cladding does not itself need to be waterproof , merely a control element: it may serve only to direct water or wind safely away in order to control run-off and prevent its infiltration into the building structure. Cladding may also be a control element for noise , either entering or escaping. Cladding can become a fire risk by design or material
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Cast Iron
CAST IRON is a group of iron -carbon alloys with a carbon content greater than 2%. Its usefulness derives from its relatively low melting temperature. The alloy constituents affect its colour when fractured: white cast iron has carbide impurities which allow cracks to pass straight through, grey cast iron has graphite flakes which deflect a passing crack and initiate countless new cracks as the material breaks, and ductile cast iron has spherical graphite "nodules" which stop the crack from further progressing. Carbon
Carbon
(C) ranging from 1.8–4 wt%, and silicon (Si) 1–3 wt% are the main alloying elements of cast iron. Iron
Iron
alloys with lower carbon content (~0.8%) are known as steel
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Jubilee Line
The JUBILEE LINE is a London Underground
London Underground
line. Opened in 1979, it is the newest line on the network, although some sections of track date back to 1932 and some stations to 1879. Its western end beyond Baker Street was previously the Stanmore branch of the Bakerloo line , while the new build was completed in two major sections: initially in 1979 to Charing Cross tube station in central London ; then extended in 1999 with the Jubilee Line Extension to Stratford station in east London. The later stations are larger and have special safety features , both aspects being attempts to future-proof the line. Following the extension into east London, serving areas once poorly connected to the Underground, the line has seen a huge growth in passenger numbers and is currently the third busiest on the network, with over 213 million passengers per year
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David Cameron
PRIME MINISTER OF THE UNITED KINGDOM -------------------------FIRST MINISTRY AND TERM * Cameron–Clegg coalition and agreement * Bloody Sunday apology * Spending and Strategic Defence reviews * Military intervention in Libya ( Operation Ellamy ) * Alternative Vote referendum * Phone hacking scandal * 2011 riots * Welfare Reform Act * Health and Social Care Act * London 2012 Summer Olympics *
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Prime Minister's Questions
PRIME MINISTER\'S QUESTIONS (often abbreviated to PMQS and officially known as QUESTIONS TO THE PRIME MINISTER) is a constitutional convention in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
, currently held as a single session every Wednesday at noon when the House of Commons is sitting, during which the Prime Minister spends around half an hour answering questions from Members of Parliament (MPs). CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Practice * 2.1 Deputy Prime Minister\'s Questions * 2.2 Concerns over noise levels * 3 Leaders at the dispatch box since 1961 * 4 Public perception * 5 References * 6 External links HISTORYAlthough prime ministers have answered questions in parliament for centuries, until the 1880s questions to the prime minister were treated the same as questions to other Ministers of the Crown : asked without notice, on days when ministers were available in whatever order MPs rose to ask them
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Horology
HOROLOGY (via Latin
Latin
horologium from Greek ὡρολόγιον, from ὥρα hṓra "hour; time" and -o- interfix and suffix -logy; literally "the study of time") is the art or science of measuring time . Ancient Sanskrit
Sanskrit
language has a similar word होरा (hora) meaning hour. This word is also used as a measurement of time. Clocks , watches , clockwork , sundials , hourglasses, clepsydras , timers , time recorders , marine chronometers and atomic clocks are all examples of instruments used to measure time . In current usage, horology refers mainly to the study of mechanical time-keeping devices, while chronometry more broadly includes electronic devices that have largely supplanted mechanical clocks for the best accuracy and precision in time-keeping. People interested in horology are called horologists
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Movement (clockwork)
In horology , a MOVEMENT, also known as a CALIBER, is the mechanism of a clock or watch , as opposed to the case, which encloses and protects the movement, and the face which displays the time. The term originated with mechanical timepieces, whose clockwork movements are made of many moving parts. It is less frequently applied to modern electronic or quartz timepieces, where the word module is often used instead. In modern mass-produced clocks and watches, the same movement is often inserted into many different styles of case. When buying a quality pocketwatch from the mid-19th to the mid-20th century, for example, the customer would select movement and case individually. Mechanical movements get dirty and the lubricants dry up, so they must periodically be disassembled, cleaned, and lubricated
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