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Elimelech Of Lizhensk
Elimelech Weisblum of Lizhensk (1717–March 11, 1787[1]), a Rabbi
Rabbi
and one of the great founding Rebbes of the Hasidic
Hasidic
movement, was known after his hometown, Leżajsk
Leżajsk
(Yiddish: ליזשענסק‎, translit. Lizhensk) near Rzeszów
Rzeszów
in Poland. He was part of the inner "Chevraya Kadisha" (Holy Society) school of the Maggid Rebbe
Rebbe
Dov Ber of Mezeritch (second leader of the Hasidic
Hasidic
movement), who became the decentralised, third generation leadership after the passing of Rebbe
Rebbe
Dov Ber in 1772. Their dissemination to new areas of Eastern Europe led the movement's rapid revivalist expansion. Rebbi Elimelech authored the classic work Noam Elimelech
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Hisbonenus
Jewish meditation
Jewish meditation
can refer to several traditional practices, ranging from visualization and intuitive methods, forms of emotional insight in communitive prayer, esoteric combinations of Divine names, to intellectual analysis of philosophical, ethical or mystical concepts. It often accompanies unstructured, personal Jewish prayer
Jewish prayer
that can allow isolated contemplation, and underlies the instituted Jewish services. Its elevated psychological insights can give birth to dveikus (cleaving to God), particularly in Jewish mysticism
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Hitbodedut
Hitbodedut
Hitbodedut
(Hebrew: התבודדות‎, lit. "self-seclusion", Ashkenazic pronunciation: hisboydedes/hisboydedus or hisbodedus, Sephardic pronunciation: hitbodedút ) refers to an unstructured, spontaneous and individualized form of prayer and meditation, popularized by Rebbe
Rebbe
Nachman of Breslov
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Tachanun
Tachanun or Taḥanun (Hebrew: תחנון‬ "Supplication"), also called nefilat apayim ("falling on the face"), is part of Judaism's morning (Shacharit) and afternoon (Mincha) services, after the recitation of the Amidah, the central part of the daily Jewish prayer services. Traditionally, only the first four words of the prayer are said aloud so that others take notice. It is omitted on Shabbat, Jewish holidays
Jewish holidays
and several other occasions (e.g., in the presence of a groom in the week after his marriage). Most traditions recite a longer prayer on Mondays and Thursdays.Contents1 Format 2 History 3 Days on which Tachanun is omitted 4 References 5 External linksFormat[edit] There is a short format of Tachanun and there is a long format. The long format is reserved for Monday and Thursday mornings, days when the Torah
Torah
is read in the synagogue
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Minyan
In Judaism, a minyan (Hebrew: מִנְיָן‬ [minˈjan] lit. noun count, number; pl. מִניָנִים‬ minyanim [minjanˈim]) is the quorum of ten Jewish adults required for certain religious obligations
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Baal Shem Tov
Israel
Israel
ben Eliezer (born circa 1700,[2][3] died 22 May 1760), known as the Baal Shem
Baal Shem
Tov (Hebrew: בעל שם טוב‬, /ˌbɑːl ˈʃɛm ˌtʊv/[4] or /ˌtʊf/) or Besht, was a Jewish mystical
Jewish mystical
rabbi considered the founder of Hasidic Judaism.[2] "Besht" is the acronym for Baal Shem
Baal Shem
Tov, meaning "Master of the Good Name" or "one with a good reputation."[5] The little biographical information about Besht comes from oral traditions handed down by his students ( Jacob
Jacob
Joseph of Polonne
Polonne
and others) and the legendary tales about his life and behavior collected in Shivḥei ha-Besht (In Praise of the Ba'al Shem Tov; Kapust and Berdychiv, 1814–15).[6]. Hasidim approach these legends with a blend of suspicion and belief
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Shechinah
The Shekhina(h) (also spelled Shekina(h), Schechina(h), or Shechina(h)) (Biblical Hebrew: שכינה‎) is the English transliteration of a Hebrew word meaning "dwelling" or "settling" and denotes the dwelling or settling of the divine presence of God
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Teshuvah
Repentance (Hebrew: תשובה‬, literally "return", pronounced "tshuva" or "teshuva") is one element of atoning for sin in Judaism. Judaism
Judaism
recognizes that everybody sins on occasion, but that people can stop or minimize those occasions in the future by repenting for past transgressions. Thus, the primary purpose of repentance in Judaism
Judaism
is ethical self transformation and restoring one's reputation, not divine purification.[1] A Jewish penitent is traditionally known as a baal teshuva (lit. "master of repentance" or "master of return") (Hebrew: בעל תשובה‬; for a woman: בעלת תשובה‬, baalat teshuva; plural: בעלי תשובה‬, baalei teshuva). An alternative modern term is hozer beteshuva (חוזר בתשובה‬) (lit. "returning in repentance")
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Minhag
Minhag (Hebrew: מנהג‬ "custom", pl. minhagim) is an accepted tradition or group of traditions in Judaism. A related concept, Nusach (נוסח‬), refers to the traditional order and form of the prayers.Contents1 Etymology 2 Minhag and Jewish law2.1 Discussion in Rabbinic literature 2.2 Changing minhagim 2.3 Present day3 Nusach 4 References 5 External links and resourcesEtymology[edit] The Hebrew root N-H-G (נ-ה-ג‬) means primarily "to drive" or, by extension, "to conduct (oneself)". The actual word minhag appears twice in the Hebrew Bible, both times in the same verse and rendered in this translation as "the driving":The watchman reported, saying, "He has reached them, but has not returned
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Asceticism In Judaism
Asceticism is a term derived from the Greek verb ἀσκέω, meaning "to practise strenuously," "to exercise." Athletes were therefore said to go through ascetic training, and to be ascetics. In this usage the twofold application—to the mode of living and the results attained—which marks the later theological implication of the term is clearly discernible. From the arena of physical contests the word easily passed over to that of spiritual struggles, and pre-Christian writers speak of the "askesis" of the soul or of virtue—the discipline of the soul, or the exercise in virtue. But the physical idea, no less than the moral, underlies the meaning of the term in medieval Christian parlance
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Torah
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Torah
Torah
(/ˈtɔːrəˌˈtoʊrə/; Hebrew: תּוֹרָה‬, "instruction, teaching") is the central reference of Judaism. It has a range of meanings. It can most specifically mean the first five books (Pentateuch) of the 24 books of the Tanakh, and is usually printed with the rabbinic commentaries (perushim)
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Tykocin
Tykocin
Tykocin
[tɨˈkɔt͡ɕin] Yiddish: טיקטין‎, Tiktin) is a small town in north-eastern Poland, with 2,010 inhabitants (2012), located on the Narew
Narew
river. Tykocin
Tykocin
has been situated in the Podlaskie Voivodeship since 1999. Previously, it belonged to Białystok Voivodeship (1975-1998). It is one of the oldest settlements in the region.Contents1 History of the town 2 The Holocaust 3 Points of interest 4 Notable individuals 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory of the town[edit] The name of Tykocin
Tykocin
was first mentioned in the 11th century. Through the 14th century it was a Duchy of Masovian castellany seat and castle on the Masovian border neighboring the growing medieval pagan Lithuania
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Galicia (Central Europe)
Galicia (Ukrainian and Rusyn: Галичина, Halyčyna; Polish: Galicja; Czech and Slovak: Halič; German: Galizien; Hungarian: Galícia/Kaliz/Gácsország/Halics; Romanian: Galiția/Halici; Russian: Галиция, Galicija; Yiddish: גאַליציע‎ Galitsiye) is a historical and geographic region in Central Europe[1][2][3] once a small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, that straddled the modern-day border between Poland
Poland
and Ukraine
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Nachman Of Breslov
Nachman of Breslov (Hebrew: נחמן מברסלב‎), also known as Reb Nachman of Bratslav, Reb Nachman Breslover (Yiddish: רבי נחמן ברעסלאווער‎), Nachman from Uman (April 4, 1772 – October 16, 1810), was the founder of the Breslov Hasidic movement. Rebbe Nachman, a great-grandson of the Baal Shem Tov, breathed new life into the Hasidic movement by combining the esoteric secrets of Judaism (the Kabbalah) with in-depth Torah scholarship
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Lubavitch
Chabad, also known as Lubavitch, Habad and Chabad-Lubavitch[1] (Hebrew: חב"ד‬), is an Orthodox Jewish, Hasidic movement. Chabad is today one of the world's best known Hasidic movements and is well known for its outreach
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Galicia (Eastern Europe)
Galicia (Ukrainian and Rusyn: Галичина, Halyčyna; Polish: Galicja; Czech and Slovak: Halič; German: Galizien; Hungarian: Galícia/Kaliz/Gácsország/Halics; Romanian: Galiția/Halici; Russian: Галиция, Galicija; Yiddish: גאַליציע‎ Galitsiye) is a historical and geographic region in Central Europe[1][2][3] once a small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, that straddled the modern-day border between Poland
Poland
and Ukraine
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