HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Elaine Race Riot
The ELAINE RACE RIOT, also called the ELAINE MASSACRE, began on September 30–October 1, 1919 at Hoop Spur in the vicinity of Elaine in rural Phillips County, Arkansas . With an estimated 100 to 237 blacks killed, along with five white men, it is considered the deadliest race riot in the state and one of the deadliest racial conflicts in all of United States history. Due to the widespread white mob attacks, in 2015 the Equal Justice Institute classified the black deaths as lynchings in their report on lynchings in the United States . Located in the Arkansas Delta
Arkansas Delta
, the county had been developed for cotton plantations , worked by African-American
African-American
slaves. In the early 20th century the population was still overwhelmingly black: African Americans outnumbered whites in the area around Elaine by a ten-to-one ratio, and by three-to-one in the county overall
[...More...]

"Elaine Race Riot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Searcy County, Arkansas
SEARCY COUNTY is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas . As of the 2010 census , the population was 8,195. The county seat is Marshall . The county was formed December 13, 1838, from a portion of Marion County and named for Richard Searcy, the first clerk and judge in the Arkansas Territory . The city of Searcy , Arkansas , some seventy miles away, shares the name despite having never been part of Searcy County. The county is an alcohol prohibition or dry county . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Geography * 2.1 Major highways * 2.2 Adjacent counties * 2.3 National protected areas * 3 Demographics * 4 Government and politics * 5 Education * 6 Communities * 6.1 Cities * 6.2 Towns * 6.3 Townships * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 External links HISTORYDuring the American Civil War , Searcy County, Arkansas had strong, pro-Union leanings, forming an organization, known as the "Arkansas Peace Society ". GEOGRAPHYAccording to the U.S
[...More...]

"Searcy County, Arkansas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Winchester, Arkansas
WINCHESTER is a small town in northeast Drew County , Arkansas , United States . The population was 167 at the 2010 census , declining from its 20th-century high of 279 in 1980. CONTENTS * 1 Geography * 2 Demographics * 3 Gallery * 4 References GEOGRAPHYWinchester is a town located at 33°46′22″N 91°28′36″W / 33.77278°N 91.47667°W / 33.77278; -91.47667 (33.772854, -91.476597). According to the United States Census Bureau , the town has a total area of 0.5 mi² (1.3 km²), all land. DEMOGRAPHICS HISTORICAL POPULATION CENSUS POP. %± 1920 217 — 1930 221 1.8% 1940 171 −22.6% 1950 198 15.8% 1960 185 −6.6% 1970 234 26.5% 1980 279 19.2% 1990 239 −14.3% 2000 191 −20.1% 2010 167 −12.6% EST. 2016 165 −1.2% U.S. Decennial Census As of the census of 2000, there were 191 people, 69 households, and 52 families residing in the city
[...More...]

"Winchester, Arkansas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chicago
CHICAGO (/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen )), officially the CITY OF CHICAGO, is the third-most populous city in the United States . With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States . It is the county seat of Cook County . The Chicago metropolitan area , often referred to as Chicagoland, has nearly 10 million people and is the third-largest in the United States. Chicago
Chicago
has often been called a global architecture capital and is considered one of the most important business centers in the world. Chicago
Chicago
was incorporated as a city in 1837 near a portage between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
watershed and grew rapidly in the mid-nineteenth century
[...More...]

"Chicago" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Knoxville
KNOXVILLE is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee
Tennessee
, and the county seat of Knox County . The city had an estimated population of 185,291 in 2015 and a population of 178,874 as of the 2010 census , making it the state's third largest city after Memphis and Nashville . Knoxville
Knoxville
is the principal city of the Knoxville
Knoxville
Metropolitan Statistical Area , which, in 2013, had an estimated population of 852,715. The KMSA is, in turn, the central component of the Knoxville-Sevierville-La Follette Combined Statistical Area, which, in 2013, had a population of 1,096,961. First settled in 1786, Knoxville
Knoxville
was the first capital of Tennessee. The city struggled with geographic isolation throughout the early 19th century. The arrival of the railroad in 1855 led to an economic boom
[...More...]

"Knoxville" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Washington, DC
WASHINGTON, D.C., formally the DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA and commonly referred to as "WASHINGTON", "THE DISTRICT", or simply "D.C.", is the capital of the United States
United States
. The signing of the Residence Act on July 16, 1790, approved the creation of a capital district located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast . The U.S. Constitution provided for a federal district under the exclusive jurisdiction of the Congress and the District is therefore not a part of any state. The states of Maryland and Virginia
Virginia
each donated land to form the federal district, which included the pre-existing settlements of Georgetown and Alexandria . Named in honor of President George Washington
George Washington
, the City of Washington was founded in 1791 to serve as the new national capital
[...More...]

"Washington, DC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Little Rock
LITTLE ROCK is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Arkansas
Arkansas
. It is also the county seat of Pulaski County . It was incorporated on November 7, 1831, on the south bank of the Arkansas
Arkansas
River close to the state's geographic center. The city derives its name from a rock formation along the river, named "la petit roche" by the French explorer Jean-Baptiste Bénard de La Harpe in the 1720s. The capital of the Arkansas
Arkansas
Territory was moved to Little Rock from Arkansas
Arkansas
Post in 1821. The city's population was 193,524 at the 2010 census
[...More...]

"Little Rock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arkansas Baptist College
www.arkansasbaptist.edu Old Main Building, Arkansas
Arkansas
Baptist College U.S. National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
U.S. Historic district Contributing property
Contributing property
Show map of Arkansas
Arkansas
Show map of the US LOCATION 1621 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr., Little Rock, Arkansas AREA less than one acre BUILT 1893 (1893) PART OF Central High School Neighborhood Historic District (2012 boundary increase) (#12000320) NRHP REFERENCE # 76000457 SIGNIFICANT DATES ADDED TO NRHP April 30, 1976 DESIGNATED CP June 7, 2012ARKANSAS BAPTIST COLLEGE (ABC) is a private, historically black liberal arts college located in Little Rock, Arkansas
[...More...]

"Arkansas Baptist College" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Phillips County, Arkansas
PHILLIPS COUNTY is a county located in the eastern part of the U.S. state of Arkansas , in what is known as the Arkansas Delta along the Mississippi River . As of the 2010 census , the population was 21,757. The county seat is Helena-West Helena . Phillips County is Arkansas's seventh county, formed on May 1, 1820, and named for Sylvanus Phillips , the area's first-known white settler and representative to the first Territorial Legislature of the Arkansas Territory . This lowland area was developed for cotton plantations in the antebellum area and is still largely rural. The Helena-West Helena, AR Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Phillips County. In 1919 during the Elaine race riot in Phillips County, 237 African Americans were killed, attacked by armed whites trying to suppress the Progressive Farmers and Household Union of America which was organizing in the county
[...More...]

"Phillips County, Arkansas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Poll Tax
A POLL TAX, also known as HEAD TAX or CAPITATION, is a tax levied as a fixed sum on every liable individual. Head taxes were important sources of revenue for many governments from ancient times until the 19th century. In the United Kingdom, poll taxes were levied by the governments of John of Gaunt in the 14th century, Charles II in the 17th and Margaret Thatcher in the 20th century. In the United States, voting poll taxes have been used to disenfranchise minority voters (especially under Reconstruction ). The word "poll" is an archaic term for "head" or "top of the head". The sense of "counting heads" is found in phrases like polling place and opinion poll
[...More...]

"Poll Tax" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jim Crow
JIM CROW LAWS were state and local laws that enforced racial segregation in the Southern United States
Southern United States
. Enacted by white Democratic-dominated state legislatures in the late 19th century after the Reconstruction period , these laws continued to be enforced until 1965. They mandated de jure racial segregation in all public facilities in the states of the former Confederate States of America
Confederate States of America
, starting in 1896 with a "separate but equal " status for African Americans in railroad cars. Public education had essentially been segregated since its establishment in most of the South after the Civil War . This principle was extended to public facilities and transportation, including segregated cars on interstate trains and, later, buses
[...More...]

"Jim Crow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lynchings
LYNCHING is an extrajudicial punishment by an informal group. It is most often used to characterize informal public executions by a mob in order to punish an alleged transgressor, or to intimidate a group. It is an extreme form of informal group social control such as charivari , skimmington , riding the rail , and tarring and feathering , but with a drift towards the display of a public spectacle. Instances of it can be found in societies long antedating European settlement of North America. In the U.S. most perpetrators of lynchings were white and the victims black. The political message—the promotion of white supremacy and black powerlessness—was an important element of the ritual, with lynchings photographed and published as postcards which were popular souvenirs in the U.S. As well as being hanged, victims were sometimes burned alive and tortured, with body parts removed and kept as souvenirs
[...More...]

"Lynchings" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Omaha, Nebraska
OMAHA (/ˈoʊməhɑː/ OH-mə-hah ) is the largest city in the state of Nebraska
Nebraska
and the county seat of Douglas County . Omaha
Omaha
is located in the Midwestern United States
United States
on the Missouri River
Missouri River
, about 10 miles (15 km) north of the mouth of the Platte River . Omaha
Omaha
is the anchor of the Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan area , which includes Council Bluffs, Iowa , across the Missouri River
Missouri River
from Omaha. According to the 2010 census , Omaha's population was 408,958, making it the nation\'s 43rd-largest city ; this had increased to 446,599 as of a 2014 estimate
[...More...]

"Omaha, Nebraska" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

African-American
AFRICAN AMERICANS (also referred to as BLACK AMERICANS or AFRO-AMERICANS ) are an ethnic group of Americans
Americans
with total or partial ancestry from any of the black racial groups of Africa. The term may also be used to include only those individuals who are descended from enslaved Africans . As a compound adjective the term is usually hyphenated as African-American. Black and African Americans
Americans
constitute the third largest racial and ethnic group in the United States (after White Americans
Americans
and Hispanic and Latino Americans
Americans
). Most African Americans
Americans
are descendants of enslaved peoples within the boundaries of the present United States. On average, African Americans
Americans
are of West /Central African and European descent, and some also have Native American ancestry
[...More...]

"African-American" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chicago Daily News
The CHICAGO DAILY NEWS was an afternoon daily newspaper published between 1876 and 1978 in Chicago, Illinois , United States. CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Independent newspaper * 1.2 Knight Newspapers and Field Enterprises * 2 Pulitzer Prizes * 3 References * 4 Further reading * 5 External links HISTORY Daily News Building The Daily News was founded by Melville E. Stone , Percy Meggy, and William Dougherty in 1875 and began publishing early the next year. It strove for mass readership in contrast with its primary competitor, the Chicago Tribune , which was more influential among the city's elites; for many years, the Daily News boasted a 1¢ newsstand price. Byron Andrews , fresh out of Hobart College, was one of the first reporters. Victor F. Lawson bought the Chicago Daily News in 1876 and became its business manager
[...More...]

"Chicago Daily News" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mixed Race
MULTIRACIAL is defined as made up of or relating to people of many races . Many terms exist for people of various multiracial backgrounds. While some of the terms used in the past are considered insulting and offensive, there are many socially acceptable modern terms that multiracial people identify with. These include mixed-race (or simply "mixed"), biracial, multiracial, multiethnic, polyethnic, half, half-and-half, métis , creole , mestizo , mulatto , melungeon , criollo , chindian , dougla , quadroon , zambo , eurasian , hāfu and pardo . Individuals of multiracial backgrounds make up a significant portion of the population in many parts of the world. In North America
North America
, studies have found that the multiracial population is continuing to grow. Because of a decline in racism , multiracial people no longer feel the need to hide their heritage
[...More...]

"Mixed Race" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.