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El Mo'alla
El Mo'alla
El Mo'alla
(Arabic: المعلّى‎) is a town in Upper Egypt located about 35 km south of Luxor, on the east bank of the Nile. Known as Hefat by ancient Egyptians, it served as a necropolis for the nearby city of Djerty (nowadays El-Tod) since the early First Intermediate Period. Two rock-cut tombs within it, datable to this period, are particularly remarkable because of their decorations, that of the two nomarchs Ankhtifi
Ankhtifi
and Sobekhotep.[1] References[edit]^ Bunson, Margaret R. (2002). Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt. Infobase Publishing. p. 249. ISBN 1438109970. External links[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Mo'alla necropolis.Egyptsites page on el-Mo'allaCoordinates: 25°28′20″N 32°31′30″E / 25.4722°N 32.5250°E / 25.4722; 32.5250This Egypt
Egypt
location article is a stub
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Arabic Language
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎, al-ʻarabiyyah, [al ʕaraˈbijja] (listen) or عَرَبِيّ‎, ʻarabī, [ˈʕarabiː] (listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Semitic language that first emerged in the 1st to 4th centuries CE.[5] It is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[6] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living in the area bounded by Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east and the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in Northwestern Arabia
Arabia
and in the Sinai Peninsula. The ISO classifies Arabic
Arabic
as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form, Modern Standard Arabic,[7] which is derived from Classical Arabic
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Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
(Arabic: صعيد مصر‎ Ṣaʿīd Miṣr, shortened to الصعيد aṣ-Ṣeʿīd; pronounced [esˤːe.ˈʕiːd], Coptic: ⲙⲁⲣⲏⲥ) is the strip of land on both sides of the Nile
Nile
that extends between Nubia
Nubia
and downriver (northwards) to Lower Egypt.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 Predynastic Egypt 2.2 Dynastic Egypt 2.3 Medieval Egypt 2.4 20th-century Egypt3 List of rulers of prehistoric Upper Egypt 4 List of nomes 5 See also 6 Further reading 7 Notes 8 References8.1 Bibliography9 External linksGeography[edit] Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
is between the Cataracts of the Nile
Nile
above modern-day Aswan, downriver (northwards) to the area between Dahshur
Dahshur
and El-Ayait,[citation needed] which is south of modern-day Cairo
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Luxor
Luxor
Luxor
(/ˈlʌk.sɔːr/ or /ˈlʊk.sɔːr/;[3] Arabic: الأقصر‎ al-Uqṣur ; Egyptian Arabic: Loʔṣor  IPA: [ˈloʔsˤoɾ]; Sa'idi Arabic: Logṣor  [ˈloɡsˤor], Coptic: ⲛⲏ) is a city in Upper (southern) Egypt
Egypt
and the capital of Luxor
Luxor
Governorate. The population numbers 506,588 (2012 estimate),[2] with an area of approximately 417 square kilometres (161 sq mi).[1] As the site of the Ancient Egyptian city of Thebes,[4] Luxor
Luxor
has frequently been characterized as the "world's greatest open-air museum", as the ruins of the temple complexes at Karnak
Karnak
and Luxor stand within the modern city
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Nile
The Nile
Nile
(Arabic: النيل‎, Egyptian Arabic en-Nīl, Standard Arabic an-Nīl; Coptic: ⲫⲓⲁⲣⲱ, P(h)iaro; Ancient Egyptian: Ḥ'pī and Jtrw; Biblical Hebrew: הַיְאוֹר‬, Ha-Ye'or or הַשִׁיחוֹר‬, Ha-Shiḥor) is a major north-flowing river in northeastern Africa, and is commonly regarded as the longest river in the world,[1] though some sources cite the Amazon River
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Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
Egypt
was a civilization of ancient Northeastern Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile
Nile
River in the place that is now the country Egypt
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Necropolis
A necropolis (pl. necropoleis) is a large, designed cemetery with elaborate tomb monuments. The name stems from the Ancient Greek νεκρόπολις nekropolis, literally meaning "city of the dead". The term usually implies a separate burial site at a distance from a city, as opposed to tombs within cities, which were common in various places and periods of history. They are different from grave fields, which did not have remains above the ground. While the word is most commonly used for ancient sites, the name was revived in the early 19th century and applied to planned city cemeteries, such as the Glasgow Necropolis. History[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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El-Tod
El-Tod
El-Tod
(Arabic: طود‎ aṭ-Ṭūd, Egyptian: Djerty or Ḏrty, Ancient Greek: Touphion, Latin: Tuphium, Coptic: Thouôt or Tuot) was the site of an Ancient Egyptian town[1] and a temple to the Egyptian god Monthu.[2] It is located 20 kilometres (12 mi) southwest of Luxor, Egypt,[1] near the settlement of Hermonthis.[3] A modern village now surrounds the site.Contents1 History1.1 Culture2 Remains2.1 Tod Treasure3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit] The history of the site can be traced to the Old Kingdom period of Egyptian history. A granite pillar of the Fifth dynasty pharaoh, Userkaf, is the oldest object found at El-Tod.[2] It was this same pharaoh who ordered that the temple to Monthu
Monthu
be enlarged.[4] Evidence of Eleventh dynasty building is shown in the discovery of blocks bearing the names of Mentuhotep II
Mentuhotep II
and Mentuhotep III
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First Intermediate Period
The First Intermediate Period, often described as a "dark period" in ancient Egyptian history, spanned approximately one hundred and twenty-five years, from c. 2181–2055 BC, after the end of the Old Kingdom.[1] It comprises the seventh (although it is mostly considered spurious by Egyptologists), eighth, ninth, tenth, and part of the eleventh dynasties. Very little monumental evidence survives from this period, especially towards the beginning of the era. The First Intermediate Period was a dynamic time in history where rule of Egypt was roughly divided between two competing power bases. One of those bases resided at Heracleopolis in Lower Egypt, a city just south of the Faiyum
Faiyum
region
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Rock-cut Tomb
A rock-cut tomb is a burial chamber that is cut into an existing, naturally occurring rock formation, so a type of rock-cut architecture. They are usually cut into a cliff or sloping rock face, but may go down from fairly flat ground
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Nomarch
Nomarchs (Ancient Egyptian: heri-tep a'a) were Ancient Egyptian administration officials responsible for the provinces. Effectively serving as provincial governors, they each held authority over one of the 42 nomes (Egyptian: sepat) into which the country was divided. Nome is derived from the Greek nomos, meaning a province or district, and nomarch is derived from the Greek title nomarches (νομάρχης), the ruler of a nomos.[1] The division of the kingdom into nomes can be documented as far back as the reign of Djoser
Djoser
of the Third Dynasty in the early Old Kingdom, c. 2670 BCE, and probably harks even further back to the Predynastic kingdoms of the Nile valley
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Ankhtifi
Ankhtifi
Ankhtifi
(or Ankhtify) was a nomarch of Hierakonpolis
Hierakonpolis
and a supporter of the pharaoh in Herakleopolis Magna
Herakleopolis Magna
(10th Dynasty), which was locked in a conflict with the Theban based 11th Dynasty kingdom for control of Egypt. Hence, Ankhtifi
Ankhtifi
was possibly a rival to the Theban rulers Mentuhotep I
Mentuhotep I
and Intef I
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Egypt
Coordinates: 26°N 30°E / 26°N 30°E / 26; 30Arab Republic
Republic
of Egyptجمهورية مصر العربيةArabic: Jumhūrīyat Miṣr al-ʿArabīyahEgyptian: Gomhoreyet Maṣr El ʿArabeyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" "بلادي، بلادي، بلادي" "My country, my country, my country"Capital and largest city Cairo 30°2′N 31°13′E / 30.033°N 31.217°E / 30.033; 31.217Official languages Arabic[a]National language Egyptian ArabicReligion90% Islam 9% Orthodox Christian 1% Other Christian[1]Demonym EgyptianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic• PresidentAbdel Fattah el-Sisi• Prime MinisterSherif IsmailLegislature House of RepresentativesEstablishment• Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt[2][3][b]c
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