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Eid Al-Adha
Eid al-Adha
Eid al-Adha
(Arabic: عيد الأضحى‎, translit. ʿīd al-aḍḥā, lit. 'Feast of the Sacrifice', [ʕiːd ælˈʔɑdˤħæː]), also called the "Sacrifice Feast", is the second of two Islamic holidays
Islamic holidays
celebrated worldwide each year, and considered the holier of the two. It honors the willingness of Ibrahim (Abraham) to sacrifice his son, as an act of obedience to God's command. Before Abraham sacrificed his son, God provided a male goat to sacrifice instead. In commemoration of this, an animal is sacrificed and divided into three parts: one third of the share is given to the poor and needy; another third is given to relatives, friends and neighbors; and the remaining third is retained by the family. In the Islamic lunar calendar, Eid al-Adha
Eid al-Adha
falls on the 10th day of Dhu al-Hijjah
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Muslim
65–75% Sunni
Sunni
Islam[22][note 1] 10–13% Shia
Shia
Islam[22] 15–20% Non-denominational Islam[23] ~1% Ahmadiyya[24] ~1% Other Muslim
Muslim
traditions, e.g
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Islam And Clothing
Islam
Islam
says that the believing women should lower their gaze, guard their modesty, not display their beauty and ornaments except what (must ordinarily) appear thereof; that they should draw their veils over their bosoms and not display their beauty except to their husbands, their fathers, their husband's fathers, their sons, their husbands' sons, their brothers or their brothers' sons, or their sisters' sons, or their women, Foster brother, and that they should not strike their feet in order to draw attention to their hidden ornaments. 'And O ye Believers! turn ye all together towards God, that ye may attain Bliss.' Sura
Sura
24 (An-Nur), ayat 30-31Qur'an[1] O Prophet! Tell thy wives and thy daughters and the women of the believers to draw their cloaks close round them. That will be better, so that they may be recognized and not harassed
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Somali Architecture
Somali architecture
Somali architecture
is the engineering and designing of multiple different construction types such as stone cities, castles, citadels, fortresses, mosques, temples, aqueducts, lighthouses, towers and tombs during the ancient, medieval and early modern periods in Somalia
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Sudano-Sahelian Architecture
Sudano-Sahelian
Sudano-Sahelian
architecture refers to a range of similar indigenous architectural styles common to the African peoples of the Sahel
Sahel
and Sudanian grassland (geographical) regions of West Africa, south of the Sahara, but north of the fertile forest regions of the coast. This style is characterized by the use of mudbricks and adobe plaster, with large wooden-log support beams that jut out from the wall face for large buildings such as mosques or palaces. These beams also act as scaffolding for reworking, which is done at regular intervals, and involves the local community
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Islamic Calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
is the artistic practice of handwriting and calligraphy, based upon the alphabet in the lands sharing a common Islamic cultural heritage. It includes Arabic Calligraphy, Ottoman, and Persian calligraphy.[1][2] It is known in Arabic as khatt Islami (خط اسلامي), meaning Islamic line, design, or construction.[3] The development of Islamic calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
is strongly tied to the Qur'an; chapters and excerpts from the Qur'an
Qur'an
are a common and almost universal text upon which Islamic calligraphy
Islamic calligraphy
is based
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Arab Carpet
An Arab carpet
Arab carpet
(Arabic:سجاد, Sijjad) is an oriental carpet made in the Arab world
Arab world
using traditional Arab carpet-making techniques.Part of a seri
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Persian Carpet
A Persian carpet
Persian carpet
or Persian rug (Persian: قالی ايرانى qālī-ye īranī),[1] also known as Iranian carpet (Persian: فرش ايرانى‎ farsh, meaning "to spread"), is a heavy textile, made for a wide variety of utilitarian and symbolic purpose, produced in Iran
Iran
(historically known as Persia), for home use, local sale, and export. Carpet
Carpet
weaving is an essential part of Persian culture and Iranian art. Within the group of Oriental rugs produced by the countries of the so-called "rug belt", the Persian carpet
Persian carpet
stands out by the variety and elaborateness of its manifold designs. Persian carpets and rugs of various types were woven in parallel by nomadic tribes, in village and town workshops, and by royal court manufactories alike
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Turkish Carpet
Anatolian rug
Anatolian rug
is a term of convenience, commonly used today to denote rugs and carpets woven in Anatolia
Anatolia
(or Asia minor) and its adjacent regions. Geographically, its area of production can be compared to the territories which were historically dominated by the Ottoman Empire. It denotes a knotted, pile-woven floor or wall covering which is produced for home use, local sale, and export. Together with the flat-woven kilim, Anatolian rugs represent an essential part of the regional culture, which is officially understood as the Culture of Turkey
Turkey
today,[1] and derives from the ethnic, religious and cultural pluralism of one of the most ancient centres of human civilisation. Rug weaving represents a traditional craft dating back to prehistoric times. Rugs were woven much earlier than even the oldest surviving rugs like the Pazyryk rug
Pazyryk rug
would suggest
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Abaya
The abaya "cloak" (colloquially and more commonly, Arabic: عباية‎ ʿabāyah , especially in Literary Arabic: عباءة ʿabāʾah ; plural عبايات ʿabāyāt , عباءات ʿabāʾāt ), sometimes also called an aba, is a simple, loose over-garment, essentially a robe-like dress, worn by some women in parts of the Muslim world
Muslim world
including in North Africa
North Africa
and the Arabian Peninsula.[1] Traditional abayat are black and may be either a large square of fabric draped from the shoulders or head or a long caftan. The abaya covers the whole body except the head, feet, and hands
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Ottoman Architecture
Ottoman architecture
Ottoman architecture
is the architecture of the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
which emerged in Bursa
Bursa
and Edirne
Edirne
in 14th and 15th centuries
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Agal (accessory)
The agal (Arabic: عقال‎, ‘iqāl: "bond" or "rope"), also spelled iqal, egal or igal, is an accessory worn usually by Arab men. It is a black cord, worn doubled, used to keep a ghutrah in place on the wearer's head.[1] It is traditionally made of goat hair.[2] It is usually worn in the Arabian Peninsula
Arabian Peninsula
(Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Iraq, Qatar, Ahwaz), by the Hola, and in the Levant
Levant
(Palestine, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon).Contents1 Types 2 History 3 See also 4 Gallery 5 ReferencesTypes[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Boubou (clothing)
Agbada
Agbada
is one of the names for a flowing wide sleeved robe worn by men in much of West Africa, and to a lesser extent in North Africa, related to the dashiki suit[citation needed]. The name "Agbada" originates from Yoruba language, one of the major languages on the continent. The robe is also known as Agbada
Agbada
in Dagomba language. Agbada
Agbada
is known by various names, depending on the ethnic group wearing them: Agbada
Agbada
(Yoruba , Dagomba ), boubou (from the Wolof word mbubb), babban riga (Hausa), mbubb (Wolof), k'sa or gandora (Tuareg), darra'a Maghrebi Arabic, grand boubou (in various Francophone
Francophone
West African countries) and the English term of gown. The Senegalese boubou, a variation on the grand boubou described below, is also known as the Senegalese
Senegalese
kaftan
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Chador
A chādor (Persian: چادر‎), also variously spelled in English as chadah, chad(d)ar, chader, chud(d)ah, chadur and naturalized as /tʃʌdə(ɹ)/ is an outer garment or open cloak worn by some women in Iran
Iran
and some other countries under the Persianate
Persianate
cultural sphere and areas where are Shia
Shia
i.e. Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Pakistan, India, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria and Tajikistan, in public spaces or outdoors. A chador is a full-body-length semicircle of fabric that is open down the front. This cloth is tossed over the woman's or girl's head, but then she holds it closed in the front. The chador has no hand openings, or any buttons, clasps, etc., but rather it is held closed by her hands or tucked under the wearer's arms. Before the 1978–79 Iranian Revolution, black chadors were reserved for funerals and periods of mourning. Light, printed fabrics were the norm for everyday wear
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Jellabiya
The jellabiya (Arabic: جلابية‎ / ALA-LC: jilabīyah or gal(l)abeyya Egyptian Arabic: [ɡæ.læ.ˈbej.jæ, ɡæl.læ-]; "jelebeeya" in Ethiopia; "jehllubeeya" in Eritrea) is a traditional Sudanese and Egyptian garment native to the Nile Valley.Shalatin tribe Beja people
Beja people
wearing jellabiya.It differs from the Arabian thawb in that it has a wider cut, no collar (in some case no buttons) and longer, wider sleeves. In case of farmers, these sleeves can be very wide and sewn into pockets. They are then used to store small items such as tobacco or money
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Shalwar Kameez
Shalwar kameez, also spelled salwar kameez or shalwar qameez, is a traditional outfit originating in the Indian subcontinent. It is a generic term used to describe different styles of dress.[1][2] The shalwar kameez can be worn by both men and women, but styles differ by gender
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