HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Edwin Stephen Goodrich
Edwin Stephen Goodrich FRS[1] (Weston-super-Mare, 21 June 1868 – Oxford, 6 January 1946), was an English zoologist, specialising in comparative anatomy, embryology, palaeontology, and evolution. He held the Linacre Chair of Zoology in the University of Oxford
Oxford
from 1921 to 1946. He served as editor of the Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science from 1920 until his death.[2]Contents1 Life 2 Career 3 Selected works 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] Goodrich's father died when Goodrich was only two weeks old, and his mother took her children to live with her mother at Pau, France, where he attended the local English school and a French lycée. In 1888 he entered the Slade School of Art
Slade School of Art
at University College London; there he met E
[...More...]

Obituary Notices Of Fellows Of The Royal Society
The Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
is an academic journal on the history of science published annually by the Royal Society. It publishes obituaries of Fellows of the Royal Society. It was established in 1932 as Obituary Notices of Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
and obtained its current title in 1955, with volume numbering restarting at 1. Prior to 1932, obituaries were published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society. The memoirs are a significant historical record and most include a full bibliography of works by the subjects. The memoirs are often written by a scientist of the next generation, often one of the subject's own former students, or a close colleague. In many cases the author is also a Fellow
[...More...]

picture info

Nephridia
The nephridium (plural nephridia) is an invertebrate organ which occurs in pairs and performs a function similar to the vertebrate kidney. Nephridia remove metabolic wastes from an animal's body. They are present in many different invertebrate lines. There are two basic types, metanephridia and protonephridia, but there are other types.Contents1 Metanephridia1.1 Saccate metanephridia2 Protonephridia 3 References 4 External linksMetanephridia[edit]Earthworm metanephridium (9).Earthworm metanephridiumA metanephridium (meta = "after") is a type of excretory gland found in many types of invertebrates such as annelids, arthropods and mollusca. (In mollusca, it is known as the Bojanus organ.) A metanephridium typically consists of a ciliated funnel opening into the bodycavity or coelom connected to a duct which may be variously glandularized, folded or expanded (vesiculate) and which typically opens to the organism's exterior
[...More...]

picture info

Banyuls
Banyuls
Banyuls
is a French appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) for a fortified apéritif or dessert wine made from old vines cultivated in terraces on the slopes of the Catalan Pyrenees
Pyrenees
in the Roussillon county of France, bordering, to the south, the Empordà wine region in Catalonia
Catalonia
in Spain. The AOC production area is limited to four communes of the Côte Vermeille: Banyuls
Banyuls
(from which the AOC takes its name), Cerbère, Collioure
Collioure
and Port-Vendres. Banyuls
Banyuls
Grand Cru is an AOC for superior wines that would otherwise be classified as simply Banyuls. They must be matured for 30 months
[...More...]

picture info

Naples
Naples
Naples
(/ˈneɪpəlz/; Italian: Napoli [ˈnaːpoli] ( listen), Neapolitan: Napule [ˈnɑːpələ] or [ˈnɑːpulə]; Latin: Neapolis; Ancient Greek: Νεάπολις, meaning "new city") is the capital of the Italian region Campania
Campania
and the third-largest municipality in Italy
Italy
after Rome
Rome
and Milan. In 2017, around 967,069 people lived within the city's administrative limits. The Metropolitan City of Naples
Metropolitan City of Naples
had a population of 3,115,320
[...More...]

picture info

Helgoland
Heligoland
Heligoland
(/ˈhɛlɪɡoʊlænd/; German: Helgoland [ˈhɛlɡolant]; Heligolandic
Heligolandic
Frisian: deät Lun lit. "the Land") is a small German archipelago in the North Sea.[2] The islands were at one time Danish and later British possessions. The islands are located in the Heligoland Bight
Heligoland Bight
(part of the German Bight) in the southeastern corner of the North Sea, and had a population of 1,127 at the end of 2016. They are the only German islands not in the immediate vicinity of the mainland. They lie approximately 69 kilometres (43 miles) by sea from Cuxhaven
Cuxhaven
at the mouth of the River Elbe
[...More...]

picture info

Bermuda
Coordinates: 32°20′N 64°45′W / 32.333°N 64.750°W / 32.333; -64.750BermudaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Quo Fata Ferunt" (Latin) "Whither the Fates carry (us)"[1]Anthem: "God Save the Queen" (official)"Hail to Bermuda" (unofficial) "All the Bermudians" (unofficial)aLocation of  Bermuda  (circled in red) in the Atlantic Ocean  (blue)Status British Overseas TerritoryCapital Hamilton 32°18′N 64°47′W / 32.300°N 64.783°W / 32.300; -64.783Largest city St George'sOfficial languages English[2]Ethnic groups (2010[3])54% Black 31% White 8% Multiracial 4% Asian 3% OtherDemonym BermudianGovernment Parliamentary dependency under constitutional monarchy• MonarchElizabeth II• GovernorJohn Rankin• PremierE
[...More...]

picture info

Madeira
Madeira
Madeira
(/məˈdɪərə, -ˈdɛərə/ mə-DEER-ə, -DAIR-ə; Portuguese: [mɐˈðejɾɐ, -ˈðɐj-]) is a Portuguese archipelago situated in the north Atlantic Ocean, southwest of Portugal. Its total population was estimated in 2011 at 267,785. The capital of Madeira
Madeira
is Funchal, located on the main island's south coast. The archipelago is just under 400 kilometres (250 mi) north of Tenerife, Canary Islands. Since 1976, the archipelago has been one of the two autonomous regions of Portugal
Portugal
(the other being the Azores, located to the northwest). It includes the islands of Madeira, Porto Santo, and the Desertas, administered together with the separate archipelago of the Savage Islands
[...More...]

picture info

Canary Islands
The Canary Islands
Canary Islands
(/kəˈnɛəri ˈaɪləndz/; Spanish: Islas Canarias) are an archipelago and autonomous community of Spain
Spain
located in the Atlantic Ocean, 100 kilometres (62 miles) west of Morocco
Morocco
at the closest point. The Canaries are among the outermost regions (OMR) of the European Union
European Union
proper. It is also one of the eight regions with special consideration of historical nationality recognized as such by the Spanish Government.[3][4] The seven main islands are (from largest to smallest in area) Tenerife, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, Lanzarote, La Palma, La Gomera and El Hierro. The archipelago includes much smaller islands and islets: La Graciosa, Alegranza, Isla de Lobos, Montaña Clara, Roque del Oeste and Roque del Este
[...More...]

picture info

Ceylon
Coordinates: 7°N 81°E / 7°N 81°E / 7; 81Democratic Socialist Republic
Republic
of Sri Lanka ශ්‍රී ලංකා ප්‍රජාතාන්ත්‍රික සමාජවාදී ජනරජය (Sinhalese) Srī Lankā prajātāntrika samājavādī janarajaya இலங்கை ஜனநாயக சோசலிச குடியரசு (Tamil) Ilaṅkai jaṉanāyaka sōsalisa kuṭiyarasuFlagEmblemAnthem: "Sri
[...More...]

picture info

British Malaya
The term British Malaya
British Malaya
loosely describes a set of states on the Malay Peninsula and the island of Singapore
Singapore
that were brought under British control between the 18th and the 20th centuries. Unlike the term "British India", which excludes the Indian princely states, British Malaya is often used to refer to the Malay States
Malay States
under indirect British rule as well as the Straits Settlements that were under the sovereignty of the British Crown. Before the formation of Malayan Union
Malayan Union
in 1946, the territories were not placed under a single unified administration, with the exception during the immediate post-war period when a British military became the temporary administrator of Malaya. Instead, British Malaya comprised the Straits Settlements, the Federated Malay States, and the Unfederated Malay States
[...More...]

picture info

Java
Java
Java
(Indonesian: Jawa; Javanese: ꦗꦮ; Sundanese: ᮏᮝ) is an island of Indonesia, bordered by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south and the Java Sea
Java Sea
on the north. With a population of over 141 million (Java only) or 145 million (including the inhabitants of its surrounding islands), Java
Java
is the home to 56.7 percent of the Indonesian population and is the world's most populous island.[1] The Indonesian capital city, Jakarta, is located on its northwestern coast. Much of Indonesian history took place on Java. It was the centre of powerful Hindu-Buddhist empires, the Islamic sultanates, and the core of the colonial Dutch East Indies. Java
Java
was also the center of the Indonesian struggle for independence during the 1930s and 1940s
[...More...]

picture info

Excretion
Excretion
Excretion
is the process by which metabolic waste is eliminated from an organism. In vertebrates this is primarily carried out by the lungs, kidneys and skin.[1] This is in contrast with secretion, where the substance may have specific tasks after leaving the cell. Excretion
Excretion
is an essential process in all forms of life. For example, in mammals urine is expelled through the urethra, which is part of the excretory system. In unicellular organisms, waste products are discharged directly through the surface of the cell. Green plants produce carbon dioxide and water as respiratory products. In green plants, the carbon dioxide released during respiration gets utilized during photosynthesis. Oxygen
Oxygen
is a by product generated during photosynthesis, and exits through stomata, root cell walls, and other routes
[...More...]

picture info

Plymouth
Plymouth
Plymouth
(/ˈplɪməθ/ ( listen)) is a city on the south coast of Devon, England, about 37 miles (60 km) south-west of Exeter
Exeter
and 190 miles (310 km) west-south-west of London. It lies between the mouths of the rivers Plym to the east and Tamar to the west, where they join Plymouth Sound
Plymouth Sound
to form the boundary with Cornwall. Plymouth's early history extends to the Bronze Age, when a first settlement emerged at Mount Batten. This settlement continued as a trading post for the Roman Empire, until it was surpassed by the more prosperous village of Sutton founded in the ninth century, now called Plymouth
[...More...]

picture info

Germ Cell
A germ cell is any biological cell that gives rise to the gametes of an organism that reproduces sexually. In many animals, the germ cells originate in the primitive streak and migrate via the gut of an embryo to the developing gonads. There, they undergo meiosis, followed by cellular differentiation into mature gametes, either eggs or sperm. Unlike animals, plants do not have germ cells designated in early development
[...More...]

picture info

Thymus Gland
The thymus is a specialized primary lymphoid organ of the immune system. Within the thymus, T cells mature. T cells are critical to the adaptive immune system, where the body adapts specifically to foreign invaders. The thymus is composed of two identical lobes and is located anatomically in the anterior superior mediastinum, in front of the heart and behind the sternum. Histologically, each lobe of the thymus can be divided into a central medulla and a peripheral cortex which is surrounded by an outer capsule. The cortex and medulla play different roles in the development of T cells. Cells in the thymus can be divided into thymic stromal cells and cells of hematopoietic origin (derived from bone marrow resident hematopoietic stem cells). Developing T cells are referred to as thymocytes and are of hematopoietic origin
[...More...]

.