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Education
Education
Education
is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include storytelling, discussion, teaching, training, and directed research. Education
Education
frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, but learners may also educate themselves.[1] Education
Education
can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational
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Euclid's Elements
The Elements (Ancient Greek: Στοιχεῖα Stoicheia) is a mathematical treatise consisting of 13 books attributed to the ancient Greek mathematician Euclid
Euclid
in Alexandria, Ptolemaic Egypt
Ptolemaic Egypt
c. 300 BC. It is a collection of definitions, postulates, propositions (theorems and constructions), and mathematical proofs of the propositions. The books cover plane and solid Euclidean geometry, elementary number theory, and incommensurable lines. Elements is the oldest extant large-scale deductive treatment of mathematics. It has proven instrumental in the development of logic and modern science, and its logical rigor was not surpassed until the 19th century. Euclid's Elements
Euclid's Elements
has been referred to as the most successful[1][2] and influential[3] textbook ever written
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Habit (psychology)
A habit (or wont) is a routine of behavior that is repeated regularly and tends to occur subconsciously.[1][2][3] The American Journal of Psychology (1903) defines a "habit, from the standpoint of psychology, [as] a more or less fixed way of thinking, willing, or feeling acquired through previous repetition of a mental experience."[4] Habitual behavior often goes unnoticed in persons exhibiting it, because a person does not need to engage in self-analysis when undertaking routine tasks. Habits are sometimes compulsory.[3][5] New behaviours can become automatic through the process of habit formation
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Mosaic
A mosaic is a piece of art or image made from the assemblage of small pieces of colored glass, stone, or other materials. It is often used in decorative art or as interior decoration. Most mosaics are made of small, flat, roughly square, pieces of stone or glass of different colors, known as tesserae. Some, especially floor mosaics, are made of small rounded pieces of stone, and called "pebble mosaics". Mosaics have a long history, starting in Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the 3rd millennium BC. Pebble mosaics were made in Tiryns
Tiryns
in Mycenean Greece; mosaics with patterns and pictures became widespread in classical times, both in Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
and Ancient Rome. Early Christian basilicas from the 4th century onwards were decorated with wall and ceiling mosaics
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Formality
A formality is an established procedure or set of specific behaviors and utterances, conceptually similar to a ritual although typically secular and less involved. A formality may be as simple as a handshake upon making new acquaintances in Western culture to the carefully defined procedure of bows, handshakes, formal greetings, and business card exchanges that may mark two businessmen being introduced in Japan. In legal and diplomatic circles, formalities include such matters as greeting an arriving head of state with the appropriate national anthem. Cultures and groups within cultures often have varying degrees of formality which can often prove a source of frustration or unintentional insult when people of different expectations or preferences interact. Those from relatively informal backgrounds may find formality to be empty and hypocritical, or unnecessarily demanding
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Matteo Ricci
Matteo Ricci, S.J. (Italian pronunciation: [matˈtɛːo ˈrittʃi]; Latin: Mattheus Riccius Maceratensis; 6 October 1552 – 11 May 1610), was an Italian Jesuit
Jesuit
priest and one of the founding figures of the Jesuit
Jesuit
China
China
missions. His 1602 map of the world in Chinese characters
Chinese characters
introduced the findings of European exploration to East Asia. He is considered a Servant of God in Roman Catholicism. Ricci arrived at the Portuguese settlement of Macau
Macau
in 1582 where he began his missionary work in China. He became the first European to enter the Forbidden City
Forbidden City
of Beijing
Beijing
in 1601 when invited by the Wanli Emperor, who sought his selected services in matters such as court astronomy and calendrical science
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Etymologically
Etymology
Etymology
(/ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi/)[1] is the study of the history of words, their origins, and how their form and meaning have changed over time.[1] By extension, the term "the etymology (of a word)" means the origin of the particular word. For a language such as Greek with a long written history, etymologists make use of texts in these languages and texts about the languages to gather knowledge about how words were used during earlier periods of their history and when they entered the languages in question. Etymologists also apply the methods of comparative linguistics to reconstruct information about languages that are too old for any direct information to be available. By analyzing related languages with a technique known as the comparative method, linguists can make inferences about their shared parent language and its vocabulary
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Discussion
Conversation
Conversation
is interactive communication between two or more people. The development of conversational skills and etiquette is an important part of socialization
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Ancient Athens
Athens
Athens
is one of the oldest named cities in the world, having been continuously inhabited for at least 5000 years.[1] Situated in southern Europe, Athens
Athens
became the leading city of Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
in the first millennium BC, and its cultural achievements during the 5th century BC laid the foundations of western civilization. During the early Middle Ages, the city experienced a decline, then recovered under the later Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
and was relatively prosperous during the period of the Crusades
Crusades
(12th and 13th centuries), benefiting from Italian trade
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Homonym
In linguistics, homonyms, broadly defined, are words which sound alike or are spelled alike, but have different meanings. A more restrictive definition sees homonyms as words that are simultaneously homographs (words that share the same spelling, regardless of their pronunciation) and homophones (words that share the same pronunciation, regardless of their spelling)[1] – that is to say they have identical pronunciation and spelling, whilst maintaining different meanings. The relationship between a set of homonyms is called homonymy. Examples of homonyms are the pair stalk (part of a plant) and stalk (follow/harass a person) and the pair left (past tense of leave) and left (opposite of right)
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Pompeii
Pompeii
Pompeii
was an ancient Roman town-city near modern Naples, in the Campania
Campania
region of Italy, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. Pompeii, along with Herculaneum
Herculaneum
and many villas in the surrounding area, was mostly destroyed and buried under 4 to 6 m (13 to 20 ft) of volcanic ash and pumice in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius
Vesuvius
in AD 79. Archaeologists believe that the town was founded in the 7th or 6th century BC by the Osci
Osci
or Oscans. It came under the domination of Rome in the 4th century BC, and was conquered and became a Roman colony in 80 BC after it joined an unsuccessful rebellion against the Roman Republic
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Middle Kingdom Of Egypt
The Middle Kingdom of Egypt
Egypt
(also known as The Period of Reunification) is the period in the history of ancient Egypt
Egypt
between circa 2050 BC and 1710 BC, stretching from the reunification of Egypt under the impulse of Mentuhotep II
Mentuhotep II
of the Eleventh Dynasty to the end of the Twelfth Dynasty. Some scholars also include the Thirteenth Dynasty of Egypt
Egypt
wholly into this period as well, in which case the Middle Kingdom would finish c. 1650, while others only include it until Merneferre Ay
Merneferre Ay
c. 1700 BC, last king of this dynasty to be attested in both Upper and Lower Egypt
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Values
In ethics, value denotes the degree of importance of some thing or action, with the aim of determining what actions are best to do or what way is best to live (normative ethics), or to describe the significance of different actions. It may be described as treating actions as abstract objects, putting value to them. It deals with right conduct and living a good life, in the sense that a highly, or at least relatively high valuable action may be regarded as ethically "good" (adjective sense), and that an action of low value, or relatively low in value, may be regarded as "bad".[citation needed] What makes an action valuable may in turn depend on the ethic values of the objects it increases, decreases or alters. An object with "ethic value" may be termed an "ethic or philosophic good" (noun sense). Values can be defined as broad preferences concerning appropriate courses of actions or outcomes. As such, values reflect a person's sense of right and wrong or what "ought" to be
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Xu Guangqi
Candida Xu (granddaughter)[5] (Xu Zhun)[6] (Xu Maheux)[6]This is a Chinese name; the family name is Xú (徐).Xu GuangqiTraditional Chinese 徐光啓Simplified Chinese 徐光启TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin Xú GuāngqǐWade–Giles Hsü Kuang-ch‘iCourtesy nameChinese 子先TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin ZǐxiānWade–Giles Tzu-hsienSecond alternative Chinese nameChinese 玄扈TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin XuánhùWade–Giles Hsüan-huThird alternative Chinese nameTraditional Chinese 保祿Simplified Chinese 保禄Literal meaning PaulusTranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin BǎolùWade–Giles Pao-lu
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Experience
Experience is the knowledge or mastery of an event or subject gained through involvement in or exposure to it.[1] Terms in philosophy such as "empirical knowledge" or "a posteriori knowledge" are used to refer to knowledge based on experience. A person with considerable experience in a specific field can gain a reputation as an expert. The concept of experience generally refers to know-how or procedural knowledge, rather than propositional knowledge: on-the-job training rather than book-learning. The interrogation of experience has a long term tradition in continental philosophy. Experience plays an important role in the philosophy of Søren Kierkegaard
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Knowledge
Knowledge
Knowledge
is a familiarity, awareness, or understanding of someone or something, such as facts, information, descriptions, or skills, which is acquired through experience or education by perceiving, discovering, or learning. Knowledge
Knowledge
can refer to a theoretical or practical understanding of a subject
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