HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Edmund Randolph
Edmund Jennings Randolph (August 10, 1753 – September 12, 1813) was an American attorney and politician. He was the seventh Governor of Virginia, the second Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General.Contents1 Life and career1.1 Political career1.1.1 Constitutional Convention1.2 Role in ratification1.2.1 Virginia
Virginia
Convention 1.2.2 Washington's Cabinet1.3 Romance with Elizabeth Nicholas1.3.1 Resignation1.4 Later years2 Death and legacy 3 Sources 4 Further reading 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Randolph was born on August 10, 1753 to the influential Randolph family in Williamsburg in the Colony of Virginia. He was educated at the College of William and Mary. After graduation he began reading law with his father John Randolph and uncle, Peyton Randolph
[...More...]

"Edmund Randolph" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

List Of Secretaries Of State Of The United States
This is a list of Secretaries of State of the United States.Contents1 Secretaries of Foreign Affairs (1781–1789) 2 List of Secretaries of State 3 List of Secretaries of State by time in office 4 Living former Secretaries of State 5 Notes 6 ReferencesSecretaries of Foreign Affairs (1781–1789)[edit] Main article: United States Secretary of Foreign Affairs List of Secretaries of State[edit]Parties  No party (1)   Federalist (6)   Democratic-Republican (6)   Democratic (26)   Whig (5)   Republican (28)Status  Denotes acting Secretary of StateNo. Portrait Name State of Residence Took office Left office President(s)–John Jay[A] Acting New York September 26, 1789 March 22, 1790George Washington1Thomas Jefferson[M] Virginia March 22, 1790 December 31, 17932Edmund J
[...More...]

"List Of Secretaries Of State Of The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Slavery
Slavery
Slavery
is any system in which principles of property law are applied to people, allowing individuals to own, buy and sell other individuals, as a de jure form of property.[1] A slave is unable to withdraw unilaterally from such an arrangement and works without remuneration. Many scholars now use the term chattel slavery to refer to this specific sense of legalised, de jure slavery
[...More...]

"Slavery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

General Officer
A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.[1] The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank. It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général. The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction. Today, the title of "General" is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However different countries use different systems of stars for senior ranks
[...More...]

"General Officer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Virginia
Virginia
Virginia
(/vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen); officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern[6] and Mid-Atlantic[7] regions of the United States
United States
located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. Virginia
Virginia
is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first English colonial possession established in mainland North America,[8] and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains
Blue Ridge Mountains
and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach
Virginia Beach
is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision
[...More...]

"Virginia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fourth Virginia Convention
The Fourth Virginia Convention
Fourth Virginia Convention
was a meeting of the Patriot legislature of Virginia held in Williamsburg in December 1775.Edmund Pendleton Presiding officerContents1 Background 2 Meeting 3 See also 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] This Convention followed the Third Virginia Convention, which recessed on August 26, 1775. Peyton Randolph, who presided over the first three Conventions, died on October 22. On November 14th, the governor John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore issued Dunmore's Proclamation. This declared that Virginia was in a state of rebellion and would be placed under martial law, and promised freedom to any slaves to join the British armed forces in suppressing the revolt. Meeting[edit]Virginia Capitol, Williamsburg VA where the Fourth Convention of 1776 met Edmund Pendleton
Edmund Pendleton
was elected to preside over the Convention
[...More...]

"Fourth Virginia Convention" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Robert Carter Nicholas, Sr.
Robert Carter Nicholas was a Virginia
Virginia
lawyer and political figure. He served in the Virginia
Virginia
House of Burgesses, the General Assembly, and the Court of Appeals, predecessor of the Supreme Court of Virginia. Biography[edit] Robert Carter Nicholas was the son of Dr. George Nicholas and Elizabeth Carter Burwell Nicholas (widow of Nathaniel Burwell) of Williamsburg, Virginia. His father was a British convict, transported for forgery. His mother was the daughter of wealthy Virginia landowner, Robert "King" Carter
Robert "King" Carter
of Corotoman. Born January 28, 1728/9, both of his parents were dead by 1734. Nicholas studied law at the College of William and Mary
College of William and Mary
and practiced in the general court under the royal government
[...More...]

"Robert Carter Nicholas, Sr." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Peyton Randolph (governor)
Peyton Randolph (1779 – December 26, 1828) was a Democratic-Republican
Democratic-Republican
politician from Virginia
Virginia
who served as acting Governor of Virginia
Governor of Virginia
for several days at the end of 1811 and beginning of 1812. Biography[edit] Peyton Randolph was the son of Edmund Jennings Randolph
Edmund Jennings Randolph
who had been a delegate to the Continental Congress, Governor of Virginia, and the first U.S. Attorney General. He was born in Williamsburg, Virginia
Williamsburg, Virginia
in 1779, graduated from the College of William and Mary
College of William and Mary
in 1798, studied law, and practiced in Richmond. He served on the Virginia
Virginia
Privy Council from 1809 to 1812
[...More...]

"Peyton Randolph (governor)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Continental Congress
The Continental Congress, also known as the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Congress, was a convention of delegates called together from the Thirteen Colonies. It became the governing body of the United States
United States
during the American Revolution. The Congress met from 1774 to 1789 in three incarnations. The first call for a convention was made over issues of the blockade and the Intolerable Acts
Intolerable Acts
penalizing the Province of Massachusetts, which in 1774 enabled Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin
to convince the colonies to form a representative body
[...More...]

"Continental Congress" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Annapolis Convention (1786)
The Annapolis Convention, formally titled as a Meeting of Commissioners to Remedy Defects of the Federal Government, was a national political convention held September 11–14, 1786 at Mann's Tavern in Annapolis, Maryland, in which twelve delegates from five states—New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Virginia—gathered to discuss and develop a consensus about reversing the protectionist trade barriers that each state had erected
[...More...]

"Annapolis Convention (1786)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Marshall
John Marshall
John Marshall
(September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was an American politician and the fourth Chief Justice of the United States (1801–1835). His court opinions helped lay the basis for United States constitutional law and many[who?] say he made the Supreme Court of the United States
United States
a coequal branch of government along with the legislative and executive branches. Previously, Marshall had been a leader of the Federalist Party
Federalist Party
in Virginia
Virginia
and served in the United States House of Representatives from 1799 to 1800. He was Secretary of State under President John Adams
John Adams
from 1800 to 1801 and, at the age of 45, became the last of the chief justices to be born in Colonial America. The longest-serving Chief Justice and the fourth longest-serving justice in U.S
[...More...]

"John Marshall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Constitutional Convention (United States)
The Constitutional Convention[1]:31 (also known as the Philadelphia Convention,[1]:31 the Federal Convention,[1]:31 or the Grand Convention at Philadelphia[2][3]) took place from May 25 to September 17, 1787, in the old Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State House (later known as Independence Hall
[...More...]

"Constitutional Convention (United States)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Virginia Plan
The Virginia
Virginia
Plan (also known as the Randolph Plan, after its sponsor, or the Large-State Plan) was a proposal by Virginia
Virginia
delegates for a bicameral legislative branch.[1] The plan was drafted by James Madison while he waited for a quorum to assemble at the Constitutional Convention of 1787.[2][3] The Virginia
Virginia
Plan was notable for its role in setting the overall agenda for debate in the convention and, in particular, for setting forth the idea of population-weighted representation in the proposed national legislature. Background[edit] The Constitutional Convention gathered in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
to revise the Articles of Confederation
[...More...]

"Virginia Plan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Committee Of Detail
The Committee
Committee
of Detail was a committee established by the United States Constitutional Convention on July 24, 1787 to put down a draft text reflecting the agreements made by the Convention up to that point, including the Virginia Plan's 15 resolutions. The Convention adjourned from July 26 to August 6 to await their report. Much of what was contained in the final document was present in this draft. The Committee
Committee
was chaired by John Rutledge, with the other members including Edmund Randolph, Oliver Ellsworth, James Wilson, and Nathaniel Gorham
[...More...]

"Committee Of Detail" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Continental Army
The Continental Army
Continental Army
was formed by the Second Continental Congress after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
by the colonies that became the United States
United States
of America. Established by a resolution of the Congress on June 14, 1775, it was created to coordinate the military efforts of the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
in their revolt against the rule of Great Britain. The Continental Army
Continental Army
was supplemented by local militias and troops that remained under control of the individual states or were otherwise independent
[...More...]

"Continental Army" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

George Mason
George Mason
George Mason
(sometimes referred to as George Mason
George Mason
IV; December 11, 1725 [O.S. November 30, 1725] – October 7, 1792) was a Virginia planter and politician, and a delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention of 1787, one of three delegates, together with fellow Virginian Edmund Randolph
Edmund Randolph
and Elbridge Gerry
Elbridge Gerry
of Massachusetts[1], who refused to sign the constitution. His writings have been a significant influence on political thought and events, including substantial portions of the Fairfax Resolves
Fairfax Resolves
of 1774, the Virginia Declaration of Rights of 1776, and his Objections to this Constitution of Government (1787) in opposition to ratification of the constitution
[...More...]

"George Mason" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.