HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Economy Of Vanuatu
Vanuatu's economy is primarily agricultural; 80% of the population is engaged in agricultural activities that range from subsistence farming to smallholder farming of coconuts and other cash crops.[3] Copra is by far the most important cash crop (making up more than 35% of Vanuatu's exports), followed by timber, beef, and cocoa
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Bislama Language
Bislama (English: /ˈbɪsləmɑː/;[3] Bislama: [bislaˈma]; also known by its earlier French name, bichelamar[4] [biʃlamaʁ]) is a creole language, and one of the official languages of Vanuatu. It is the first language of many of the "Urban ni-Vanuatu" (citizens who live in Port Vila and Luganville), and the second language of much of the rest of the country's residents. The lyrics of "Yumi, Yumi, Yumi", the country's national anthem, are composed in Bislama. More than 95% of Bislama words are of English origin, whilst the remainder comprises a few dozen words from French, as well as some specific vocabulary inherited from various languages of Vanuatu; though these are essentially limited to flora and fauna terminology.[5] While the influence of these vernacular languages is low on the vocabulary side, it is very high in the morphosyntax
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Vegetable

Vegetables are parts of plants that are consumed by humans or other animals as food. The original meaning is still commonly used and is applied to plants collectively to refer to all edible plant matter, including the flowers, fruits, stems, leaves, roots, and seeds. The alternate definition of the term is applied somewhat arbitrarily, often by culinary and cultural tradition. It may exclude foods derived from some plants that are fruits, flowers, nuts, and cereal grains, but include savoury fruits such as tomatoes and courgettes, flowers such as broccoli, and seeds such as pulses. Originally, vegetables were collected from the wild by hunter-gatherers and entered cultivation in several parts of the world, probably during the period 10,000 BC to 7,000 BC, when a new agricultural way of life developed
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Peanut

The peanut, also known as the groundnut,[2] goober (US),[3] pindar (US)[3] or monkey nut (UK), and taxonomically classified as Arachis hypogaea, is a legume crop grown mainly for its edible seeds. It is widely grown in the tropics and subtropics, being important to both small and large commercial producers. It is classified as both a grain legume[4] and, due to its high oil content, an oil crop.[5] World annual production of shelled peanuts was 44 million tonnes in 2016, led by China with 38% of the world total. Atypically among legume crop plants, peanut pods develop underground (geocarpy) rather than above ground
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Prime Minister

A prime minister is the head of the cabinet and the leader of the ministers in the executive branch of government, often in a parliamentary or semi-presidential system. A prime minister is not the head of state of their respective state nor a monarch, rather they are the head of government, serving typically under a monarch in a hybrid of aristocratic and democratic government forms or a president in a republican form of government. In parliamentary systems fashioned after the Westminster system, the prime minister is the presiding and actual head of government and head of the executive branch. In such systems, the head of state or their official representative (e.g., monarch, president, governor-general) usually holds a largely ceremonial position, although often with reserve powers. In many systems, the prime minister selects and may dismiss other members of the cabinet, and allocates posts to members within the government
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Edward Natapei
Edward Nipake Natapei Tuta Fanua`araki[1][2] (17 July 1954[3] – 28 July 2015) was a Vanuatuan politician. He was elected Prime Minister of Vanuatu on two separate occasions for two separate terms, and was previously the Minister of Foreign Affairs briefly in 1991, the acting President of Vanuatu from 2 March 1999 to 24 March 1999 (during a time in which he was the Speaker of Parliament) and Deputy Prime Minister. He was the President of the Vanua'aku Pati, a socialist, Anglophone political party. Natapei was first elected to Parliament in 1983
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Tangbunia Bank
The Tangbunia Bank (widely misreported as Tari Bunia) is a bank run by the Turaga indigenous movement on Pentecost Island in Vanuatu. It is notable for dealing in items of customary wealth such as hand-woven mats, shells or pig tusks rather than Western currency. Accounts at the bank are reckoned in livatu, a unit equivalent to the value of one fully curved boar's tusk.[1] The Tangbunia Bank has fourteen branches throughout the island, with its headquarters at Lavatmanggemu. The bank's manager is Chief Viraleo Boborenvanua. It was set up in accordance with the national government's support for the indigenous customary economy, in a country where a majority of the population does not participate extensively in a monetary economy
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Tubers
Tubers are enlarged structures in some plant species used as storage organs for nutrients. They are used for the plant's perennation (survival of the winter or dry months), to provide energy and nutrients for regrowth during the next growing season, and as a means of asexual reproduction.[1] Stem tubers form thickened rhizomes (underground stems) or stolons (horizontal connections between organisms). Common plant species with stem tubers include the potato and yam. Some sources also treat modified lateral roots (root tubers) under the definition; these are found in sweet potatoes, cassava, and dahlias. The term originates from Latin tuber, meaning "lump, bump, swelling".[2] Some sources define the term "tuber" to mean only structures derived from stems;[3] others use the term for structures derived from stems or roots.[4] A stem tuber forms from thickened rhizomes or stolons
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]