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Economy Of Pittsburgh
The economy of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is diversified, focused on services, medicine, higher education, tourism, banking, corporate headquarters and high technology. Once the center of the American steel industry, and still known as "The Steel
Steel
City", today the city of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
has no steel mills within its limits, though Pittsburgh-based companies such as US Steel, Ampco Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
and Allegheny Technologies
Allegheny Technologies
own several working mills in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
was chosen for the 2009 G-20 summit as its transformation is an example of a 21st-century economy
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Allegheny River
The Allegheny River
River
(/ˌæləˈɡeɪni/ AL-ə-GAY-nee) is a principal tributary of the Ohio River; it is located in the Eastern United States. The Allegheny River
River
joins with the Monongahela River
Monongahela River
to form the Ohio River
Ohio River
at the "Point" of Point State Park
Point State Park
in Downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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Isaac Craig
Isaac Craig (1742, Ireland – 1826, Pennsylvania) was a Pittsburgh businessman and politician in the early days of western Pennsylvania settlement.Contents1 Life 2 Chief Burgess 3 See also 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Craig was born in County Down in Ireland of Protestant parents, and was fortunate enough to be apprenticed as a carpenter. After completing his apprenticeship, he became a journeyman carpenter and from his earnings was able to pay for his passage to Philadelphia. He prospered as a carpenter in Philadelphia, and at a young age became a master carpenter and a member of the Carpenters Company. He purchased land in western Pennsylvania while still in Philadelphia, and eventually went to live in Pittsburgh. In 1785, Craig married Amelia Neville in Pittsburgh, daughter of Virginian General John Neville. She survived him by more than two decades. The couple were the parents of newspaper editor Neville B
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Whiskey
Whisky
Whisky
or whiskey[1] is a type of distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash. Various grains (which may be malted) are used for different varieties, including barley, corn (maize), rye, and wheat. Whisky
Whisky
is typically aged in wooden casks, generally made of charred white oak. Whisky
Whisky
is a strictly regulated spirit worldwide with many classes and types
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Carnegie Library
A Carnegie library
Carnegie library
is a library built with money donated by Scottish businessman and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. A total of 2,509 Carnegie libraries were built between 1883 and 1929, including some belonging to public and university library systems. 1,689 were built in the United States, 660 in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Ireland, 125 in Canada, and others in Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, Serbia, Belgium, France, the Caribbean, Mauritius, Malaysia, and Fiji. At first, Carnegie libraries were almost exclusively in places where he had a personal connection - namely his birthplace in Scotland
Scotland
and the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
area, his adopted home-town
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Monongahela River
The Monongahela River
River
(/məˌnɒŋɡəˈhiːlə, -ˈheɪ-/ mə-NONG-gə-HEE-lə, -HAY-)[10] — often referred to locally as the Mon (/ˈmɒn/) — is a 130-mile-long (210 km)[6] river on the Allegheny Plateau
Allegheny Plateau
in north-central West Virginia
West Virginia
and southwestern Pennsylvania, which flows from south to north. The Monongahela joins the Allegheny River
River
to form the Ohio River
Ohio River
at Pittsburgh.Contents1 Etymology1.1 Variant names2 Geography 3 History3.1 Ice Age 3.2 18th and 19th centuries 3.3 20th century4 Gallery 5 See also 6 Notes and references 7 Bibliography 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The Unami word Monongahela means "falling banks", in reference to the geological instability of the river's banks
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Ohio River
The Ohio
Ohio
River, which streams westward from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Cairo, Illinois, is the largest tributary, by volume, of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the United States. At the confluence, the Ohio
Ohio
is considerably bigger than the Mississippi
Mississippi
( Ohio
Ohio
at Cairo: 281,500 cu ft/s (7,960 m3/s);[2] Mississippi
Mississippi
at Thebes: 208,200 cu ft/s (5,897 m3/s)[3]) and, thus, is hydrologically the main stream of the whole river system. The 981-mile (1,579 km) river flows through or along the border of six states, and its drainage basin includes parts of 15 states. Through its largest tributary, the Tennessee River, the basin includes many of the states of the southeastern U.S
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Service (economics)
In economics, a service is a transaction in which no physical goods are transferred from the seller to the buyer. The benefits of such a service are held to be demonstrated by the buyer's willingness to make the exchange. Public services are those that society (nation state, fiscal union, region) as a whole pays for. Using resources, skill, ingenuity, and experience, service providers benefit service consumers.Contents1 Five I's1.1 Intangibility 1.2 Inconsistency (variability) 1.3 Involvement2 Service quality 3 Specification 4 Delivery 5 Service-commodity goods continuum 6 Service types 7 List of countries by tertiary output 8 See also 9 ReferencesFive I's[edit] Services can be described in terms of I's. Intangibility[edit] Services are by definition intangible. They are not manufactured, transported or stocked. It is used in marketing to describe the inability to assess the value gained from an activity using any tangible e Services cannot be stored for a future use
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Glass Production
Glass
Glass
production involves two main methods – the float glass process that produces sheet glass, and glassblowing that produces bottles and other containers.Contents1 Glass
Glass
container production
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The Gospel Of Wealth
"Wealth",[2] more commonly known as "The Gospel of Wealth",[3] is an article written by Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
in June[4] of 1889[5] that describes the responsibility of philanthropy by the new upper class of self-made rich. Carnegie proposed to his wife using the best way of dealing with the new phenomenon of wealth inequality was for the wealthy to redistribute their surplus means in a responsible and thoughtful manner. This approach was contrasted with traditional bequest (patrimony), where wealth is handed down to heirs, and other forms of bequest e.g. where wealth is willed to the state for public purposes. Carnegie argued that poor people put to best use (i.e. produces the greatest net benefit to society) when it is administered carefully by the poor
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American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
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H. J. Heinz
The H. J. Heinz Company, or Heinz, is an American food processing company with world headquarters in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It was founded by Henry John Heinz in 1869. The H. J
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George Westinghouse
George Westinghouse
George Westinghouse
Jr. (October 6, 1846 – March 12, 1914) was an American entrepreneur and engineer based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania who invented the railway air brake and was a pioneer of the electrical industry, gaining his first patent at the age of 19. Westinghouse saw the potential in alternating current as an electricity distribution system in the early 1880s and put all his resources into developing and marketing it, a move that put his business in direct competition with the Edison direct current system
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Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
(/kɑːrˈneɪɡi/ kar-NAY-gee, but commonly /ˈkɑːrnəɡi/ KAR-nə-ghee or /kɑːrˈnɛɡi/ kar-NEG-ee;[3] November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, business magnate, and philanthropist. Carnegie led the expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century and is often identified as one of the richest people (and richest Americans).[4] He became a leading philanthropist in the United States and in the British Empire. During the last 18 years of his life, he gave away about $350 million[5][note 1] to charities, foundations, and universities—almost 90 percent of his fortune. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and stimulated a wave of philanthropy. Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States with his parents in 1848
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Thomas Mellon
Thomas Alexander Mellon (February 3, 1813 – February 3, 1908) was a Scotch-Irish American, entrepreneur, lawyer, and judge, best known as the founder of Mellon Bank and patriarch of the Mellon family
Mellon family
of Pittsburgh.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Family and personal life 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Mellon was born to farmers Andrew Mellon and Rebecca Wauchob on February 3, 1813, at Camp Hill Cottage, Lower Castletown, parish of Cappagh, County Tyrone, Ireland now Northern Ireland. The original family house now forms the centrepiece of the Ulster American Folk Park Museum. His family had come into Ireland from Scotland around the middle of the seventeenth century. In 1816, his grandfather, Archibald Mellon, emigrated to the United States, settling in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania
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Andrew Mellon
Andrew William Mellon (/ˈmɛlən/; March 24, 1855 – August 26, 1937) was an American banker, businessman, industrialist, philanthropist, art collector, and politician. From the wealthy Mellon family of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he established a vast business empire before transitioning into politics. He served as United States Secretary of the Treasury from March 9, 1921 to February 12, 1932, presiding over the boom years of the 1920s and the Wall Street crash of 1929. A conservative Republican, Mellon lowered taxes and government spending in the aftermath of World War I. The son of banker Thomas Mellon, Andrew Mellon
Andrew Mellon
quickly established himself in the financial world. He became an owner of the family banking business, T. Mellon & Sons, and branched out into other businesses
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