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Ecgfrith Of Northumbria
Ecgfrith (c. 645 – 20 May 685) was the King of Deira
Deira
from 664 until 670, and then King of Northumbria
King of Northumbria
from 670 until his death in 685. He ruled over Northumbria when it was at the height of its power, but his reign ended with a disastrous defeat at the Battle of Nechtansmere
Battle of Nechtansmere
in which he lost his life.Contents1 Early life 2 King of Northumbria 3 Coinage 4 Citations 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Ecgfrith was born in 645 to king Oswiu
Oswiu
and Eanflæd his queen. At about the age of 10 Ecgfrith was held as a hostage at the court of Queen Cynewise after her husband king Penda of Mercia
Penda of Mercia
invaded Northumbria in 655
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Prosopography Of Anglo-Saxon England
The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
(PASE) is a database and associated website that aims to collate everything that was written in contemporary records about anyone who lived in Anglo-Saxon England, in a prosopography.[1]
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Merovingian Dynasty
The Merovingians (/ˌmɛroʊˈvɪndʒiən/) were a Salian Frankish dynasty that ruled the Franks
Franks
for nearly 300 years in a region known as Francia
Francia
in Latin, beginning in the middle of the 5th century. Their territory largely corresponded to ancient Gaul
Gaul
as well as the Roman provinces of Raetia, Germania Superior
Germania Superior
and the southern part of Germania. Childeric I
Childeric I
(c
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Bede
Bede
Bede
(/biːd/ BEED; Old English: Bǣda, Bēda; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable
Venerable
Bede, and Bede
Bede
the Venerable (Latin: Bēda Venerābilis), was an English monk at the monastery of St. Peter and its companion monastery of St. Paul in the Kingdom of Northumbria of the Angles
Angles
(contemporarily Monkwearmouth– Jarrow
Jarrow
Abbey in Tyne and Wear, England). Born on lands likely belonging to the Monkwearmouth monastery, Bede
Bede
was sent there at the age of seven and later joined Abbot
Abbot
Ceolfrith
Ceolfrith
at the Jarrow
Jarrow
monastery, both of whom survived a plague that struck in 686, an outbreak that killed a majority of the population there
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Fortriu
Fortriu
Fortriu
or the Kingdom of Fortriu
Fortriu
is the name given by historians for a Pictish kingdom recorded between the 4th and 10th centuries,[1] and often used synonymously with Pictland in general
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Angus, Scotland
Angus (Scottish Gaelic: Aonghas) is one of the 32 local government council areas of Scotland, a registration county and a lieutenancy area. The council area borders Aberdeenshire, Dundee City
Dundee City
and Perth and Kinross. Main industries include agriculture and fishing. Global pharmaceuticals company GSK has a significant presence in Montrose in the north of the county. Angus was historically a county, known officially as Forfarshire from the 18th century until 1928. It remains a registration county and a lieutenancy area
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Badenoch
Badenoch
Badenoch
(from the Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
Bàideanach meaning drowned land) is a traditional district which today forms part of Badenoch
Badenoch
and Strathspey, an area of Highland Council, in Scotland, bounded on the north by the Monadhliath Mountains, on the east by the Cairngorms and Braemar, on the south by Atholl
Atholl
and the Grampians, and on the west by Lochaber. The capital of Badenoch
Badenoch
is Kingussie.Contents1 Geography 2 Population 3 History 4 Economy 5 Notes and referencesGeography[edit] The somewhat undefined area of Badenoch
Badenoch
covers 36 miles (58 km) from northeast to southwest and 15 miles (24 km) from north to south, comprising 540 square miles (1,400 km2)
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Viking Age
The Viking
Viking
Age (c. 800AD-c. 1050) is a period in European history, especially Northern European and Scandinavian history, following the Germanic Iron Age.[1] It is the period of history when Scandinavian Norsemen
Norsemen
explored Europe
Europe
by its seas and rivers for trade, raids, colonization, and conquest. In this period, the Norsemen
Norsemen
settled in Norse Greenland, Newfoundland, and present-day Faroe Islands, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Normandy, Scotland, England, Ireland, Isle of Man, the Netherlands, Germany, Ukraine, Russia, and Turkey. Viking
Viking
travellers and colonists were seen at many points in history as brutal raiders
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Iona
Iona (Scottish Gaelic: Ì Chaluim Chille) is a small island in the Inner Hebrides off the Ross of Mull on the western coast of Scotland. It is mainly known for Iona Abbey, though there are other buildings on the island. Iona Abbey was a centre of Gaelic monasticism for three centuries[3] and is today known for its relative tranquility and natural environment.[6] It is a tourist destination and a place for spiritual retreats
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Anglo-Saxons
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
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Penny
A penny is a coin (pl. pennies) or a unit of currency (pl. pence) in various countries. Borrowed from the Carolingian denarius (whence its former abbreviation d.), it is usually the smallest denomination within a currency system. Presently, it is the formal name of the British penny (abbr. p) and the informal name of one American cent (abbr. ¢) as well as the informal Irish designation of 1 cent euro coin (abbr. c). It is the informal name of the cent unit of account in Canada, although one cent coins are no longer minted there.[1] The name is also used in reference to various historical currencies also derived from the Carolingian system, such as the French denier
French denier
and the German pfennig. It may also be informally used to refer to any similar smallest-denomination coin, such as the euro cent or Chinese fen. The Carolingian penny was originally a .940-fine silver coin weighing 1/240 pound
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Francia
Francia, also called the Kingdom of the Franks
Franks
(Latin: Regnum Francorum), or Frankish Empire
Empire
was the largest post-Roman Barbarian kingdom in Western Europe. It was ruled by the Franks
Franks
during Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. The core Frankish territories inside the Roman empire
Roman empire
were close to the Rhine
Rhine
and Maas rivers in the north. After a period where small kingdoms inter-acted with the remaining Gallo-Roman institutions to their south, a single kingdom uniting them was founded by Clovis I
Clovis I
who was crowned King of the Franks
Franks
in 496
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Battle Of The Trent
A battle is a combat in warfare between two or more armed forces, or combatants. A war sometimes consists of many battles. Battles generally are well defined in duration, area, and force commitment.[1] A battle with only limited engagement between the forces and without decisive results is sometimes called a skirmish. Wars and military campaigns are guided by strategy, whereas battles take place on a level of planning and execution known as operational mobility.[2] German strategist Carl von Clausewitz
Carl von Clausewitz
stated that "the employment of battles ..
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Shilling
The shilling is a unit of currency formerly used in Austria, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, United States, and other British Commonwealth
British Commonwealth
countries. Currently the shilling is used as a currency in four east African countries of Kenya
Kenya
(Kenyan shilling) Tanzania
Tanzania
(Tanzanian shilling) Uganda
Uganda
(Ugandan shilling) and Somalia (Somali shilling) (autonomous region of Somalia
Somalia
Somaliland
Somaliland
(Somaliland Shilling). It is also the proposed currency of the east African community plans to introduce (east African shilling). The word shilling comes from scilling, an accounting term that dates back to Anglo-Saxon times, and from there back to Old Norse, where it means "division". Slang terms for the old shilling coins include "bob" and "hog"
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Sceat
A sceat (pronounced [ʃæt] shat; pl. sceattas) was a small, thick silver coin minted in England, Frisia
Frisia
and Jutland
Jutland
during the Anglo-Saxon period.Contents1 History 2 Legends 3 Imagery 4 Minting 5 Gallery 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 Bibliography7 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Anglo-Saxon penny Its name derives from Old English
Old English
sceatt, meaning "wealth", "money", and "coin", which has been applied to these coins since the 17th century based on interpretations of the legal codes of Mercia
Mercia
and of Kent under its king Æthelberht.[1] It is likely, however, that the coins were more often known to contemporaries as "pennies" (Old English: peningas), much like their successor silver coins
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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