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Ecclesiastical Province
An ecclesiastical province is a general term for one of the basic forms of jurisdiction in Christian
Christian
Churches with traditional hierarchical structure, including Western Christianity
Christianity
and Eastern Christianity. In general, ecclesiastical province is consisted of several dioceses (or eparchies), one of them being the archdiocese (or archeparchy), headed by metropolitan bishop or archbishop who has ecclesiastical jurisdiction over all other bishops of the province. In the Greco-Roman world, ecclesia (Greek ἐκκλησίᾱ, ekklēsiā ( Latin
Latin
ecclesia) meaning "congregation, church") was used to refer to a lawful assembly, or a called legislative body
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Metropolis Of Oltenia
The Metropolis of Oltenia
Oltenia
(Romanian: Mitropolia Olteniei) is a metropolis of the Romanian Orthodox Church. Its see is the Archdiocese of Craiova; its suffragan dioceses are the Archdiocese of Râmnic
Archdiocese of Râmnic
and the dioceses of Severin and Strehaia and Slatina and Romanați. The headquarters is the Cathedral of Saint Demetrius in Craiova. Covering the historic region of Oltenia, it is the successor of the Metropolis of Severin, attested as of 1370 and located at Severin. After a short period, this entity was moved to Râmnic as the Diocese
Diocese
of Râmnic-Nou Severin. The modern metropolis was established in November 1939 and dissolved in April 1945, shortly after the imposition of a Romanian Communist Party-dominated government. In mid-1947, the Archdiocese of Craiova, covering western Oltenia, was created
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Christian
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Christian Church
The Christian
Christian
Church is an ecclesiological term generally used by Protestants to refer to the whole group of people belonging to the Christianity
Christianity
throughout history. In this understanding, the "Christian Church" does not refer to a particular Christian denomination
Christian denomination
but to the body of all believers. Some Christian
Christian
traditions, however, believe that the term " Christian
Christian
Church" or "Church" applies only to a specific historic Christian
Christian
body or institution (e.g., the Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church, the Non-Chalcedonian Churches of Oriental Orthodoxy, or the Assyrian Church of the East)
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Romanian Orthodox Church
(as Metropolis of Romania) Nifon Rusailă, Carol I (as Patriarchate
Patriarchate
of Romania) Miron Cristea, Ferdinand IIndependence 1872Recognition 25 April 1885Primate Daniel, Patriarch
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Western Christianity
Western Christianity
Christianity
is the type of Christianity
Christianity
which developed in the areas of the former Western Roman Empire.[1] Western Christianity consists of the Latin Rite
Latin Rite
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
(in contrast to the Eastern rites in communion with Rome) and a wide variety of Protestant denominations. The name "Western Christianity" is applied in order to distinguish these from Eastern Christianity. With the expansion of European colonialism from the Early Modern era, Western Christianity
Christianity
spread throughout the Americas, much of the Philippines, Southern Africa, pockets of West Africa, and throughout Australia
Australia
and New Zealand
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Middle Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
(from Greek ορθοδοξία, orthodoxía – "right opinion")[1] is adherence to correct or accepted creeds, especially in religion.[2] In the Christian sense the term means "conforming to the Christian faith as represented in the creeds of the early Church."[3] The first seven Ecumenical Councils were held between the years of 325 and 787 with the aim of formalizing accepted doctrines. In some English speaking countries, Jews who adhere to all the traditions and commandments as legislated in the
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Extraterritoriality
Extraterritoriality
Extraterritoriality
is the state of being exempted from the jurisdiction of local law, usually as the result of diplomatic negotiations. Historically, this primarily applied to individuals, as jurisdiction was usually claimed on peoples rather than on lands.[1] Extraterritoriality
Extraterritoriality
can also be applied to physical places, such as foreign embassies, military bases of foreign countries, or offices of the United Nations
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Anglican Communion
The Anglican
Anglican
Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members,[1][2] founded in 1867 in London, England. It consists of the Church of England
England
and national and regional Anglican episcopal polities in full communion with it,[3] with traditional origins of their doctrines summarised in the Thirty-nine Articles (1571). Archbishop
Archbishop
Justin Welby
Justin Welby
of Canterbury
Canterbury
acts as a focus of unity, recognised as primus inter pares ("first among equals"), but does not exercise authority in the provinces outside England. The Anglican
Anglican
Communion was founded at the Lambeth Conference
Lambeth Conference
in 1867 in London, England, under the leadership of Charles Longley, Archbishop
Archbishop
of Canterbury
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Serbian Orthodox Church
The Serbian Orthodox Church
Serbian Orthodox Church
(Serbian: Српска православна црква / Srpska pravoslavna crkva) is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Christian Churches. It is the second oldest Slavic Orthodox Church in the world (after the Bulgarian Orthodox Church). The Serbian Orthodox Church
Serbian Orthodox Church
comprises the majority of the population in Serbia, Montenegro, and the Republika Srpska
Republika Srpska
entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina
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Archbishopric Of Ohrid
The Archbishopric of Ohrid (Serbian: Охридска архиепископија/Ohridska arhiepiskopija), also known as the Bulgarian Archbishopric of Ohrid (Bulgarian: Българска Охридска архиепископия), originally called Ohrid Archbishopric of Justiniana prima and all Bulgaria (Greek: Αρχιεπίσκοπος της πρωτης 'Ιουστινιανης και πάσης Βουλγαριας), was an autonomous Orthodox Church under the tutelage of the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople between 1019 and 1767. It was established following the Byzantine conquest of the First Bulgarian Empire in 1018 by lowering the rank of the autocephalous Bulgarian Patriarchate due to its subjugation to Constantinople.Contents1 History1.1 Prelude 1.2 History 1.3 Abolition2 Language 3 Administration 4 See also 5 References and notes 6 Literature 7 External linksHistory[edit] Prelude[edit] In 972, Byzantine Emperor John I Tzimiskes (r
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First Council Of Nicaea
The First Council of Nicaea
Nicaea
(/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈnikεa]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in the Bithynian city of Nicaea
Nicaea
(now İznik, Bursa province, Turkey) by the Roman Emperor Constantine I
Constantine I
in AD 325. Constantine I
Constantine I
organized the council along the lines of the Roman Senate
Roman Senate
and presided over it, but did not cast any official vote. This ecumenical council was the first effort to attain consensus in the Church through an assembly representing all of Christendom
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Synod Of Antioch
Beginning with three synods convened between 264 and 269 in the matter of Paul of Samosata, more than thirty councils were held in Antioch in ancient times. Most of these dealt with phases of the Arian and of the Christological controversies.[1] For example, the Catholic Encyclopedia article on Paul of Samosata states:It must be regarded as certain that the council which condemned Paul rejected the term homoousios; but naturally only in a false sense used by Paul; not, it seems because he meant by it a unity of Hypostasis in the Trinity (so St. Hilary), but because he intended by it a common substance out of which both Father and Son proceeded, or which it divided between them, — so St. Basil and St. Athanasius; but the question is not clear
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