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Ecclesiastical Polity
Ecclesiastical polity is the operational and governance structure of a church or of a Christian denomination. It also denotes the ministerial structure of a church and the authority relationships between churches. Polity relates closely to ecclesiology, the study of doctrine and theology relating to church organization.Contents1 History 2 Use as a term 3 Types of polity3.1 Episcopal polity 3.2 Hierarchical polity 3.3 Connexional polity 3.4 Presbyterian
Presbyterian
polity 3.5 Congregational polity4 Polity, autonomy, and ecumenism 5 Plurality and singularity 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] Issues of church governance appear in the first chapters of the Acts of the Apostles; the first act recorded after the ascension is the election of Matthias as one of the Twelve Apostles, replacing Judas Iscariot
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Episcopal Polity
An episcopal polity is a hierarchical form of church governance ("ecclesiastical polity") in which the chief local authorities are called bishops. (The word "bishop" derives, via the British Latin
British Latin
and Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
term *ebiscopus/*biscopus, from the Ancient Greek επίσκοπος epískopos meaning "overseer".) It is the structure used by many of the major Christian Churches and denominations, such as the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Church of the East, Anglican and Lutheran
Lutheran
churches or denominations, and other churches founded independently from these lineages. Churches with an episcopal polity are governed by bishops, practicing their authorities in the dioceses and conferences or synods
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E-governance
Electronic governance or e-governance is the application of information and communication technology (ICT) for delivering government services, exchange of information, communication transactions, integration of various stand-alone systems and services between government-to-citizen (G2C), government-to-business (G2B), government-to-government (G2G) , government-to-employees (G2E) as well as back office processes and interactions within the entire government framework.[1] Through e-governance, government services will be made available to citizens in a convenient, efficient and transparent manner. The three main target groups that can be distinguished in governance concepts are government, citizens and businesses/interest groups
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SOA Governance
SOA governance is a concept used for activities related to exercising control over services in a service-oriented architecture (SOA). One viewpoint, from IBM [1] and others, is that SOA governance is an extension (subset) of IT governance which itself is an extension of corporate governance. The implicit assumption in this view is that services created using SOA are just one more type of IT asset in need of governance, with the corollary that SOA governance does not apply to IT assets that are "not SOA". A contrasting viewpoint, expressed by blogger Dave Oliver [2] and others, is that service orientation provides a broad organising principle for all aspects of IT in an organisation — including IT governance. Hence SOA governance is nothing but IT governance informed by SOA principles. The focus of SOA governance is on those resources to deliver value to the business
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Soil Governance
Soil
Soil
governance refers to the policies, strategies, and the processes of decision-making employed by nation states and local governments regarding the use of soil.[1] Globally, governance of the soil has been limited to an agricultural perspective due to increased food insecurity from the most populated regions on earth
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Technology Governance
"TECHNOLOGY GOVERNANCE" is the system by which the current and future use of technology is directed and controlled. According to Streams Model of Technology
Technology
by Azhar Zia-ur-Rehman there are three types of technologies that an enterprise may employ. 1. Industrial technology -- the body of knowledge that is specific to a certain industry or business and without which that industry of business cannot operate at all 2. Business technology -- the formalized processes, procedures and rules that are employed to run an enterprise based on a certain industrial technology 3. Information technology -- the resources used to acquire, process, store and disseminate information generated or used by the employed business technologies. Technology
Technology
governance also means the governance, i.e., the steering between the different sectors—state, business, and NGOs—of the development of technology
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Transnational Governance
Transnational governance, within a European Union
European Union
framework, is both a subset of governance in general and an application of it to situations outside its usual limits of corporate or governmental hierarchies, whether regional or national. When such disparate hierarchies within the EU find common goals, typically within a conterminous geographic area, they seek to achieve them by integrating their various policies and activities
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Website Governance
Website
Website
governance is an organization's structure of staff and the technical systems, policies and procedures to maintain and manage a website.[1][2][3][4] Website
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World Governance Index
The World Governance Index (WGI) is an indicator developed in 2008 by the Forum for a new World Governance (FnWG). It aims to provide, year on year, a precise image of the situation of world governance and of its evolution
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Sustainable Governance Indicators
The Sustainable Governance Indicators (SGI), first published in spring 2009 and updated in 2011, analyze and compare the need for reform in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
(OECD) member countries, as well as each country's ability to respond to current social and political challenges. The project is designed to create a comprehensive data pool on government-related activities in the countries considered the world's most developed free-market democracies. In addition, it uses international comparisons to provide evidence-based input for reform-related public discourse taking place in these countries
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Chief Governance Officer
Not to be confused with chief governing officerPart of a series onGovernanceModelsCollaborative Good Multistakeholder Open-source Private SelfBy levelLocal GlobalBy fieldClimate Clinical Corporate Cultural Data Earth system Ecclesiastical Environmental Higher education Information Network Ocean Political party Project Security sector Self Simulation Service-oriented architecture Soil Technology Transnational WebsiteMeasuresWorld Governance Index Sustainable Governance IndicatorsRelated topicsChief governance officerGovernance, risk management and complianceE-governanceEnvironmental, social and corporate governan
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Governance, Risk Management, And Compliance
Governance, risk management[1] and compliance or GRC is the umbrella term covering an organization's approach across these three areas: Governance, risk management, and compliance.[2][3][4] The first scholarly research on GRC was published in 2007[5] where GRC was formally defined as "the integrated collection of capabilities that enable an organization to reliably achieve objectives, address uncertainty and act with integrity." The research referred to common "keep the company on track" activities conducted in departments such as internal audit, compliance, risk, legal, finance, IT, HR as well as the lines of business, executive suite and the board itself.Contents1 Overview 2 GRC topics2.1 Basic concepts 2.2 GRC market segmentation 2.3 GRC product vendors 2.4 GRC data warehousing and business intelligence3 GRC research 4 See also 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] Governance, Risk Management, and Compliance (GRC) are three related facets that help assure an
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Environmental, Social And Corporate Governance
Environmental, social and governance (ESG) refers to the three central factors in measuring the sustainability and ethical impact of an investment in a company or business.[1] These criteria help to better determine the future financial performance of companies (return and risk).[2]Contents1 History 2 Environmental concerns2.1 Climate change 2.2 Nuclear energy 2.3 Sustainability3 Social concerns3.1 Diversity 3.2 Human rights 3.3 Consumer protection 3.4 Animal welfare4 Corporate governance
Corporate governance
concerns4.1 Management structure 4.2 Employee relations 4.3 Executive compensation


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Security Sector Governance And Reform
The concepts of security sector governance and reform (SSG/R, or SSG and SSR) generally refer to a process in Western-based international development and democratization to amend the security sector of a state towards good governance and its principles, such as freedom of information and the rule of law.[1][2] The objective of security sector reform (SSR) is to achieve good security sector governance (SSG)—where security actors are effective and accountable to their people
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Market Governance Mechanism
Market governance mechanisms (MGMs) are formal or informal rules that have been consciously designed to change the behaviour of various economic actors - including individuals, businesses, organisations and governments - to encourage sustainable development. Well known MGMs include fair trade certification, the European Union Emission Trading System and Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES). MGMs, meanwhile, are not to be confused with market-based instruments, for MGMs, as a group, includes command and control regulations as well as regulatory economics
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Church Body
A church is a Christian
Christian
religious organization or congregation or community that meets in a particular location. Many are formally organized, with constitutions and by-laws, maintain offices, are served by clergy or lay leaders, and, in nations where this is permissible, often seek non-profit corporate status.[1] Local churches often relate with, affiliate with, or consider themselves to be constitutive parts of denominations, which are also called churches in many traditions
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