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Easter
Easter,[nb 1] also called Pascha (Greek, Latin)[nb 2] or Resurrection Sunday,[3][4] is a festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
from the dead, described in the New Testament
New Testament
as having occurred on the third day of his burial after his crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary
Calvary
c
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Calvary
Calvary, or Golgotha ( Biblical Greek
Biblical Greek
Γολγοθᾶ[ς] Golgotha[s], traditionally interpreted as reflecting Syriac (Aramaic) golgolta,[1] as it were Hebrew gulgōleṯ "skull"[2]), was, according to the Gospels, a site immediately outside Jerusalem's walls where Jesus was crucified.[3] Matthew's and Mark's gospels translate the term to mean "place of [the] skull" (Κρανίου Τόπος Kraníou Tópos),[4] in Latin rendered Calvariæ Locus, from which the English word Calvary
Calvary
derives. Its traditional site, identified by Helena of Constantinople, the mother of Constantine I, in 325, is at the site of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre
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Holiday
A holiday is a day set aside by custom or by law on which normal activities, especially business or work including school, are suspended or reduced. Generally, holidays are intended to allow individuals to celebrate or commemorate an event or tradition of cultural or religious significance. Holidays may be designated by governments, religious institutions, or other groups or organizations. The degree to which normal activities are reduced by a holiday may depend on local laws, customs, the type of job being held or personal choices. The concept of holidays often originated in connection with religious observances. The intention of a holiday was typically to allow individuals to tend to religious duties associated with important dates on the calendar
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Hebrew Calendar
The Hebrew or Jewish calendar (הַלּוּחַ הָעִבְרִי‬, Ha-Luah ha-Ivri) is a lunisolar calendar used today predominantly for Jewish religious observances. It determines the dates for Jewish holidays and the appropriate public reading of Torah
Torah
portions, yahrzeits (dates to commemorate the death of a relative), and daily Psalm
Psalm
readings, among many ceremonial uses. In Israel, it is used for religious purposes, provides a time frame for agriculture and is an official calendar for civil purposes, although the latter usage has been steadily declining in favor of the Gregorian calendar. The present Hebrew calendar
Hebrew calendar
is the product of evolution, including a Babylonian influence
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Lunisolar Calendar
A lunisolar calendar is a calendar in many cultures whose date indicates both the moon phase and the time of the solar year. If the solar year is defined as a tropical year, then a lunisolar calendar will give an indication of the season; if it is taken as a sidereal year, then the calendar will predict the constellation near which the full moon may occur. As with all calendars which divide the year into months there is an additional requirement that the year have a whole number of months
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Shrove Tuesday
Shrove Tuesday
Shrove Tuesday
(also known in Commonwealth countries and Ireland
Ireland
as Pancake
Pancake
Tuesday or Pancake
Pancake
day) is the day in February or March immediately preceding Ash Wednesday
Ash Wednesday
(the first day of Lent), which is celebrated in some countries by consuming pancakes. In others, especially those where it is called Mardi Gras
Mardi Gras
or some translation thereof, this is a carnival day, and also the last day of "fat eating" or "gorging" before the fasting period of Lent. This moveable feast is determined by Easter
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Moveable Feast
A moveable feast or movable feast is an observance in a Christian liturgical calendar that occurs on a different date (relative to the dominant civil or solar calendar) in different years.[1] The most important set of moveable feasts are a fixed number of days before or after Easter Sunday, which varies by over 40 days since it depends partly on the phase of the moon and must be computed each year. In Eastern Christianity
Eastern Christianity
(including the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Assyrian Church of the East, and the Eastern Catholic Churches), these moveable feasts form what is called the Paschal cycle, which stands in contrast to the approach taken by Catholic and Protestant Christianity. Most other feast days, such as those of particular saints, are fixed feasts, held on the same date every year
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Penance
Penance
Penance
is repentance of sins as well as a name of the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Oriental Orthodox
Oriental Orthodox
of Penance
Penance
and Reconciliation/Confession.[1] It also plays a part in confession among Anglicans and Methodists, in which it is a rite,[2][3] as well as among other Protestants. The word penance derives from Old French
Old French
and Latin
Latin
paenitentia, both of which derive from the same root meaning repentance, the desire to be forgiven (in English see contrition). Penance
Penance
and repentance, similar in their derivation and original sense, have come to symbolize conflicting views of the essence of repentance, arising from the controversy as to the respective merits of "faith" and "good works"
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Sexagesima
Sexagesima /sɛksəˈdʒɛsɪmə/, or, in full, Sexagesima Sunday, is the name for the second Sunday before Ash Wednesday in the Gregorian Rite liturgical calendar of the Roman Catholic Church, and also in that of some Protestant denominations, particularly those with Anglican and Lutheran origins.Contents1 Description 2 Anglican use 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] The name "Sexagesima" is derived from the Latin sexagesimus, meaning "sixtieth," and appears to be a back-formation of Quinquagesima, the term formerly used to denote the last Sunday before Lent (the latter name alluding to the fact that there are fifty days between that Sunday and Easter, if one counts both days themselves in the total as was the usual custom of the Roman Empire)
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Passover
Passover
Passover
or Pesach (/ˈpɛsɑːx, ˈpeɪsɑːx/;[4] from Hebrew פֶּסַח‬ Pesah, Pesakh) is a major, biblically derived Jewish holiday. Jews
Jews
celebrate Passover
Passover
as a commemoration of their liberation by God from slavery in ancient Egypt and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses
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Church Service
A church service (also called a service of worship, or simply a service) is a formalized period of communal worship in Christian tradition. It often but not exclusively occurs on Sunday, or Saturday in the case of those churches practicing seventh-day Sabbatarianism. The church service is the gathering together of Christians to be taught the 'Word of God' (the Christian Bible) and encouraged in their faith. Technically, the "church" in "church service" refers to the gathering of the faithful rather than to the building in which it takes place
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Foot Washing
Maundy (from the Vulgate
Vulgate
of John 13:34 mandatum meaning "command"),[1][2][3][4][5] or the Washing of the Feet, is a religious rite observed by various Christian
Christian
denominations. The name is taken from the first few Latin words sung at the ceremony of the washing of the feet, "Mandatum novum do vobis ut diligatis invicem sicut dilexi vos" ("I give you a new commandment, That ye love one another as I have loved you") (John 13:34), and from the Latin form of the commandment of Christ that we should imitate His loving humility in the washing of the feet (John 13:14–17). The term mandatum (maundy), therefore, was applied to the rite of foot-washing on this day of the Christian
Christian
Holy Week
Holy Week
called Maundy Thursday. John 13:1–17 recounts Jesus' performance of this act
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Resurrection Of Jesus In Christian Art
The Resurrection of Jesus has long been central to Christian faith and Christian art, whether as a single scene or as part of a cycle of the Life of Christ. In the teachings of the traditional Christian churches, the sacraments derive their saving power from the passion and resurrection of Christ, upon which the salvation of the world entirely depends.[1] The redemptive value of the resurrection has been expressed through Christian art, as well as being expressed in theological writings. However, the moment of the Resurrection is not described as such in the Gospels, and for over a thousand years it was therefore not represented directly in art
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Corpus Christi (feast)
The Feast of Corpus Christi ( Latin
Latin
for "Body of Christ") is the Roman Rite liturgical solemnity celebrating the real presence of the body and blood of Jesus Christ, the Son of God, in the Eucharist—known as transubstantiation. Two months earlier, the Eucharist
Eucharist
is observed on Holy Thursday
Holy Thursday
in a somber atmosphere leading to Good Friday. Corpus Christi emphasizes the joy of the Eucharist
Eucharist
being the body and blood of Jesus Christ. The feast is liturgically celebrated on the Thursday after Trinity Sunday or, "where the Solemnity
Solemnity
of The Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ is not a holy day of obligation, it is assigned to the Sunday after the Most Holy Trinity as its proper day".[1] At the end of Holy Mass, there is often a procession of the Blessed Sacrament, generally displayed in a monstrance
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