HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

East Zenati Languages
The East Zenati languages (Blench, 2006) or Tunisian and Zuwara (Kossmann, 2013) are a group of the Zenati Berber dialects spoken in Tunisia
Tunisia
and Libya. Marteen Kossmann considers the easternmost varieties of Zenati dialects as transitional to Eastern Berber, but they are quite different from the neighboring Nafusi. According to Kossmann, the dialect cluster of Tunisian Berber and Zuwara is consisting of the varieties spoken in mainland Tunisia (Sened (extinct), Matmata and Tataouine), Jerba and Zuwara, but not Nafusi which is considered a dialect of Eastern Berber.[3] Before Kossmann, Roger Blench (2006) considered East Zanati to be a dialect cluster consisting of Sened (extinct, including Tmagurt), Djerbi, Matmata (Tamezret, Zrawa & Taujjut), and Nafusi. [4] References[edit]^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Tunisian-Zuwara". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0
[...More...]

"East Zenati Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

North Africa
North Africa
Africa
is a collective term for a group of Mediterranean countries situated in the northern-most region of the African continent. The term "North Africa" has no single accepted definition. It is sometimes defined as stretching from the Atlantic
Atlantic
shores of Morocco
Morocco
in the west, to the Suez Canal
Suez Canal
and the Red Sea
Red Sea
in the east. Others have limited it to the countries of Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, a region known by the French during colonial times as “Afrique du Nord” and by the Arabs
Arabs
as the Maghreb
Maghreb
(“West”). The most commonly accepted definition includes Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, as well as Libya
Libya
and Egypt
[...More...]

"North Africa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Roger Blench
Roger Marsh Blench (born 1953) is a British linguist, ethnomusicologist and development anthropologist. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge
and remains based in Cambridge, England. He actively researches and publishes, although he works as a private consultant rather than in academia. A noted expert in African linguistics,[1] Blench's main area of linguistic interest is the Niger–Congo language family
Niger–Congo language family
although he has also researched the Nilo-Saharan
Nilo-Saharan
and Afroasiatic
Afroasiatic
families. He has also written about other language families and endangered languages. Additionally, Blench has published extensively on the relationship between linguistics and archaeology, principally in Africa, but more recently also in East Asia
[...More...]

"Roger Blench" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Afroasiatic Languages
Afroasiatic (Afro-Asiatic), also known as Afrasian and traditionally as Hamito-Semitic (Chamito-Semitic)[3] or Semito-Hamitic,[4] is a large language family of about 300 languages and dialects.[5] It includes languages spoken predominantly in West Asia, North Africa, the Horn of Africa
Horn of Africa
and parts of the Sahel. Afroasiatic languages
Afroasiatic languages
have over 495 million native speakers, the fourth largest number of any language family (after Indo-European, Sino-Tibetan and Niger–Congo).[6] The phylum has six branches: Berber, Chadic, Cushitic, Egyptian, Omotic
Omotic
and Semitic. By far the most widely spoken Afroasiatic language is Arabic. A language within the Semitic branch, it includes Modern Standard Arabic as well as spoken colloquial varieties
[...More...]

"Afroasiatic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Language Family
A language family is a group of languages related through descent from a common ancestral language or parental language, called the proto-language of that family. The term "family" reflects the tree model of language origination in historical linguistics, which makes use of a metaphor comparing languages to people in a biological family tree, or in a subsequent modification, to species in a phylogenetic tree of evolutionary taxonomy. Linguists therefore describe the daughter languages within a language family as being genetically related.[1] According to Ethnologue
Ethnologue
the 7,099 living human languages are distributed in 141 different language families.[2] A "living language" is simply one that is used as the primary form of communication of a group of people
[...More...]

"Language Family" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
[...More...]

"Glottolog" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tunisia
Islam
Islam
(state religion; 99.1% Sunni[9] others (1%; including Christian, Jewish, Shia, Bahá'í)[9]Demonym TunisianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic[12][13]• PresidentBeji Caid Essebsi• Head of GovernmentYoussef ChahedLegislature Assembly of the Representatives of the PeopleFormation•  Husainid Dynasty
[...More...]

"Tunisia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Libya
Libya
Libya
(/ˈlɪbiə/ ( listen); Arabic: ليبيا‎),[6][7] officially the State of Libya
Libya
(Arabic: دولة ليبيا‎ Dawlat Lībyā),[citation needed][dubious – discuss] is a sovereign state in the Maghreb
Maghreb
region of North Africa, bordered by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, Egypt
Egypt
to the east, Sudan
Sudan
to the southeast, Chad
Chad
and Niger
Niger
to the south, and Algeria
Algeria
and Tunisia
Tunisia
to the west. The country is made of three historical regions, Tripolitania, Fezzan, and Cyrenaica
[...More...]

"Libya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dialect Cluster
The term dialect (from Latin
Latin
dialectus, dialectos, from the Ancient Greek word διάλεκτος, diálektos, "discourse", from διά, diá, "through" and λέγω, légō, "I speak") is used in two distinct ways to refer to two different types of linguistic phenomena:One usage refers to a variety of a language that is a characteristic of a particular group of the language's speakers.[1] Under this definition, the dialects or varieties of a particular language are closely related and, despite their differences, are most often largely mutually intelligible, especially if close to one another on the dialect continuum
[...More...]

"Dialect Cluster" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Historical Language
Historical languages (also known as historic languages) are languages that were spoken in a historical period, but that are distinct from their modern form; that is, they are forms of languages historically attested to from the past which have evolved into more modern forms. Thus, historical languages contrast with dead languages (languages which have become extinct, or undergone language death). Also, historical languages contrast with reconstructed languages (that is, the proto-languages) of theoretical linguistics
[...More...]

"Historical Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Siwi Language
Siwi (also known as Siwan[3] or Siwa Berber,[4] autonym: Jlan n Isiwan) is the easternmost Berber language, spoken in Egypt
Egypt
by an estimated 15,000[5][6] to 20,000[1] people in the oases of Siwa and Gara, near the Libyan border. Siwi is the normal language of daily communication among the Egyptian Berbers of Siwa and Gara, but because it is not taught at local schools, used in the media nor recognised by the Egyptian government, its long-term survival may be threatened by contacts with outsiders and by the use of
[...More...]

"Siwi Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eastern Middle Atlas Berber
Eastern Middle Atlas
Middle Atlas
Berber is a cluster of Berber dialects spoken in the eastern and north-eastern parts of the Middle Atlas, in Morocco. These dialects are those of the tribes of Aït Seghrushen, Aït Waraïn, Marmusha, Aït Alaham, Aït Yub and Aït Morghi.[2][3][4] Despite the fact that they are mutually intelligible with neighbouring Central Atlas Tamazight
Central Atlas Tamazight
dialects and are generally classified among them, these dialects actually belong to the Zenati languages and are intermediate dialects between the Riffian and Atlas languages.[5][1][6] Among these Zenati dialects, those of Aït Seghrouchen and Aït Waraïn were subject to most studies, while only a few studies were focused on the dialects of Aït Alaham and Marmusha, and practically none focused on the dialects of Aït Yub and Aït Morghi. References[edit]^ a b M
[...More...]

"Eastern Middle Atlas Berber" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Ait Seghrouchen Berber
Ait Seghrouchen Berber, or Seghroucheni (Seghrusheni), is a Zenati Berber language of the Eastern Middle Atlas
Middle Atlas
Berber cluster
[...More...]

"Ait Seghrouchen Berber" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mzab–Wargla Languages
The Mzab–Wargla languages
Mzab–Wargla languages
or Northern Saharan oasis dialects are a dialect cluster of the Zenati languages, within the Northern Berber subbranch
[...More...]

"Mzab–Wargla Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Gurara Language
Gurara (Gourara) is a Zenati Berber language
Berber language
spoken in the Gourara (Tigurarin) region, an archipelago of oases surrounding the town of Timimoun
Timimoun
in southwestern Algeria
[...More...]

"Gurara Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mozabite Language
Mozabite, or Tunżabt, is a Berber dialect spoken by the Mozabites, an Ibadi
Ibadi
Berber group inhabiting the seven cities of the M'zab
M'zab
natural region in the northern Saharan Algeria. It is also spoken by small numbers of Mozabite emigrants in other local cities and elsewhere. Mozabite is one of the Mzab–Wargla languages, a dialect cluster of the Zenati languages. It is very closely related to the nearby Berber dialects of Ouargla
Ouargla
and Oued Righ as well as the more distant Gourara. Bibliography[edit]ابراهيم و بكير عبد السلام. الوجيز في قواعد الكتابة و النحو للغة الأمازيغية "المزابية". المطبعة العرببة: غرداية 1996. Delheure, Jean. Aǧraw n Yiwalen Tumẓabt d-Tefṛansist = Dictionnaire Mozabite–Francais
[...More...]

"Mozabite Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.