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East China Sea
Coordinates: 30°N 125°E / 30°N 125°E / 30; 125East China
China
SeaThe East China
China
Sea, showing surrounding regions, islands, cities, and seasChinese nameSimplified Chinese 1. 东海 2. 东中国海Traditional Chinese 1. 東海 2. 東中國海TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin 1. Dōng Hǎi 2. Dōng Zhōngguó HǎiBopomofo 1. ㄉㄨㄥ ㄏㄞˇ ㄉㄨㄥ ㄓㄨㄥ ㄍㄨㄛˊ ㄏㄞˇWuRomanization 1. ton平 he上 2. ton平 tson平 koh入 he上HakkaRomanization 1. dung24 hoi31 2. dung24 dung24 gued2 hoi31Yue: CantoneseJyutping 1. dung1 hoi2 2. dung1 zung1 gwok3 hoi2Southern Min Hokkien
Hokkien
POJ 1. tong-hái 2. tong tiong-kok háiEastern MinFuzhou BUC 1. dĕ̤ng-hāi 2
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Miyako-jima
Miyako-jima
Miyako-jima
(宮古島, Miyako: Myaaku (ミャーク); Okinawan: Naaku (ナーク)) is the largest and the most populous island among the Miyako Islands
Miyako Islands
of Okinawa Prefecture, Japan
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Hangul
Hangul
Hangul
(/ˈhɑːnˌɡuːl/ HAHN-gool;[1] from Korean hangeul 한글 [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) is the Korean alphabet. It has been used to write the Korean language
Korean language
since its creation in the 15th century under Sejong the Great.[2][3] It is the official writing system of South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County
Changbai Korean Autonomous County
in Jilin
Jilin
Province, China. It is sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language
Cia-Cia language
spoken near the town of Bau-Bau, Indonesia. The alphabet consists of 19 consonants and 21 vowels. Hangul
Hangul
letters are grouped into syllabic blocks, vertically and horizontally
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Kyūshū
Kyushu
Kyushu
(九州, Kyūshū, literally "Nine Provinces"; Japanese: [kʲɯːꜜɕɯː]) is the third largest island of Japan
Japan
and most southwesterly of its four main islands.[2] Its alternative ancient names include Kyūkoku (九国, "Nine Provinces"), Chinzei (鎮西, "West of the Pacified Area"), and Tsukushi-no-shima (筑紫島, "Island of Tsukushi"). The historical regional name Saikaidō
Saikaidō
(西海道, lit
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International Hydrographic Organization
The International Hydrographic Organization
International Hydrographic Organization
(IHO) is the inter-governmental organisation representing hydrography. A principal aim of the IHO is to ensure that the world’s seas, oceans and navigable waters are properly surveyed and charted. It does this through the setting of international standards, the co-ordination of the endeavours of the world's national hydrographic offices, and through its capacity building programme. The IHO enjoys observer status at the United Nations
United Nations
where it is the recognised competent authority on hydrographic surveying and nautical charting
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Cape San Diego
Cape Santiago[1][2][a] (Chinese: 三貂角; pinyin: Sāndiāojiǎo; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Sam-tiau-kak) is a cape located in Gongliao District, New Taipei City, Taiwan. The cape is the easternmost point of the island of Taiwan, and also the easternmost cape of Taiwan. On 5 May 1626, a Spanish fleet reached the northeast tip of Taiwan
Taiwan
and named the native village of Caquiunauan (also Caguiuanuan; present-day Fulong Village) as Santiago
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Kyushu
Kyushu
Kyushu
(九州, Kyūshū, literally "Nine Provinces"; Japanese: [kʲɯːꜜɕɯː]) is the third largest island of Japan
Japan
and most southwesterly of its four main islands.[2] Its alternative ancient names include Kyūkoku (九国, "Nine Provinces"), Chinzei (鎮西, "West of the Pacified Area"), and Tsukushi-no-shima (筑紫島, "Island of Tsukushi"). The historical regional name Saikaidō
Saikaidō
(西海道, lit
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Hateruma
Hateruma
Hateruma
(波照間島; Hateruma-jima; Yaeyama: Hatirooma Okinawan: Hatiruma) is an island in the Yaeyama District
Yaeyama District
of Okinawa Prefecture, Japan.[1] Part of the town Taketomi, it is the southern-most inhabited island in Japan
Japan
at 24°2’25” north latitude, 123°47’16” east longitude
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Romanization Of Japanese
The romanization of Japanese is the use of Latin script
Latin script
to write the Japanese language.[1] This method of writing is sometimes referred to in English as rōmaji (ローマ字, literally, "Roman letters") ([ɾoːmaꜜʑi] ( listen). There are several different romanization systems. The three main ones are Hepburn romanization, Kunrei-shiki romanization (ISO 3602), and Nihon-shiki romanization ( ISO 3602 Strict). Variants of the Hepburn system are the most widely used. Japanese is normally written in a combination of logographic characters borrowed from Chinese (kanji) and syllabic scripts (kana) that also ultimately derive from Chinese characters. Rōmaji may be used in any context where Japanese text is targeted at non-Japanese speakers who cannot read kanji or kana, such as for names on street signs and passports, and in dictionaries and textbooks for foreign learners of the language
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Kana
Kana
Kana
(仮名) are syllabic Japanese scripts, a part of the Japanese writing system contrasted with the logographic Chinese characters known in Japan
Japan
as kanji (漢字). There are three kana scripts: modern cursive hiragana (ひらがな);[2] modern angular katakana (カタカナ); and the old syllabic use of kanji known as man'yōgana (万葉仮名) that was ancestral to both. Hentaigana
Hentaigana
(変体仮名, "variant kana") are historical variants of modern standard hiragana. In modern Japanese, hiragana and katakana have directly corresponding character sets (different sets of characters representing the same sounds). Katakana
Katakana
with a few additions is also used to write Ainu
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Miyako Islands
The Miyako Islands
Miyako Islands
(宮古列島, Miyako Rettō) are a group of islands in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, east of the Yaeyama Islands. They are situated between the Ryukyu Islands
Ryukyu Islands
and Taiwan. Miyako island has 55,914 people. A bridge connects Miyako Island to Ikema Island, which has 801 people
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Kanji
Kanji
Kanji
(漢字; [kandʑi]  listen) are the adopted logographic Chinese characters
Chinese characters
that are used in the Japanese writing system.[1] They are used alongside hiragana and katakana
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McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
romanization (/məˈkuːn ˈraɪʃaʊ.ər/) is one of the two most widely used Korean language
Korean language
romanization systems. A modified version of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
was the official romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
until 2000, when it was replaced by the Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
system. A variant of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
is still used as the official system in North Korea.[citation needed] The system was created in 1937 by George M. McCune and Edwin O. Reischauer
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Revised Romanization Of Korean
The Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
(국어의 로마자 표기법; gugeoui romaja pyogibeop. op; lit. "Roman-letter notation of the national language") is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
proclaimed by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to replace the older McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
system. The new system eliminates diacritics in favor of digraphs and adheres more closely to Korean phonology than to a suggestive rendition of Korean phonetics for non-native speakers. The Revised Romanization limits itself to the ISO basic Latin alphabet, apart from limited, often optional use of the hyphen. It was developed by the National Academy of the Korean Language from 1995 and was released to the public on 7 July 2000 by South Korea's Ministry of Culture and Tourism in Proclamation No
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Hanja
Hanja
Hanja
(Hangul: 한자; Hanja: 漢字; Korean pronunciation: [ha(ː)nt͈ɕa]) is the Korean name
Korean name
for Chinese characters (Chinese: 漢字; pinyin: hànzì).[1] More specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters
Chinese characters
borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language
Korean language
with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or Hanja-eo (the latter is more used) refers to words that can be written with Hanja, and hanmun (한문, 漢文) refers to Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
writing, although "Hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because Hanja
Hanja
never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters, though the stroke orders for some characters are slightly different
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