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ESATA
Serial ATA
Serial ATA
(SATA, abbreviated from Serial AT Attachment)[2] is a computer bus interface that connects host bus adapters to mass storage devices such as hard disk drives, optical drives, and solid-state drives. Serial ATA
Serial ATA
succeeded the older Parallel ATA
Parallel ATA
(PATA) standard,[a] offering several advantages over the older interface: reduced cable size and cost (seven conductors instead of 40 or 80), native hot swapping, faster data transfer through higher signaling rates, and more efficient transfer through an (optional) I/O
I/O
queuing protocol
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SATA (other)
SATA
SATA
is Serial ATA, a computer bus technology for connecting hard disks and other devices. SATA
SATA
or Sata may also refer to:Contents1 Airlines 2 Places 3 People 4 Other usesAirlines[edit]
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FreeBSD
FreeBSD
FreeBSD
is a free and open-source Unix-like
Unix-like
operating system descended from Research Unix
Research Unix
via the Berkeley Software Distribution
Berkeley Software Distribution
(BSD). Although for legal reasons FreeBSD
FreeBSD
cannot use the Unix
Unix
trademark, it is a direct descendant of BSD, which was historically also called "BSD Unix" or "Berkeley Unix"
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SCSI
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI, /ˈskʌzi/ SKUZ-ee)[1] is a set of standards for physically connecting and transferring data between computers and peripheral devices. The SCSI
SCSI
standards define commands, protocols, electrical and optical interfaces. SCSI
SCSI
is most commonly used for hard disk drives and tape drives, but it can connect a wide range of other devices, including scanners and CD drives, although not all controllers can handle all devices
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Marvell Technology Group
Marvell Technology Group, Limited, is a producer of storage, communications and consumer semiconductor products. The company was founded in 1995 and has approximately 5,000 employees.[3] Marvell's U.S
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Advanced Host Controller Interface
The Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI) is a technical standard defined by Intel
Intel
that specifies the operation of Serial ATA
Serial ATA
(SATA) host bus adapters in a non-implementation-specific manner. The specification describes a system memory structure for computer hardware vendors to exchange data between host system memory and attached storage devices. AHCI gives software developers and hardware designers a standard method for detecting, configuring, and programming SATA/AHCI adapters
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De Facto
In law and government, de facto (/deɪ ˈfæktoʊ/ or /di ˈfæktoʊ/[1]; Latin: de facto, "in fact"; Latin pronunciation: [deː ˈfaktoː]), describes practices that exist in reality, even if not legally recognised by official laws.[2][3][4] It is commonly used to refer to what happens in practice, in contrast with de jure ("in law"), which refers to things that happen according to law
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Hotplug
Hot swapping
Hot swapping
(frequently inaccurately called hot plugging) is replacing or adding components without stopping or shutting down the system.[1] With the appropriate software installed on the computer, a user can plug and unplug such components without rebooting. Specifically, hot swapping describes inserting and/or removing components without interruption to the system
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Native Command Queuing
In computing, Native Command Queuing
Native Command Queuing
(NCQ) is an extension of the Serial ATA
Serial ATA
protocol allowing hard disk drives to internally optimize the order in which received read and write commands are executed. This can reduce the amount of unnecessary drive head movement, resulting in increased performance (and slightly decreased wear of the drive) for workloads where multiple simultaneous read/write requests are outstanding, most often occurring in server-type applications.Contents1 History 2 Hard disk drives2.1 Performance 2.2 Safety (FUA)3 Solid-state drives 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Native Command Queuing
Native Command Queuing
was preceded by Parallel ATA's version of Tagged Command Queuing (TCQ)
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RAID
RAID
RAID
(Redundant Array of Independent Disks, originally Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) is a data storage virtualization technology that combines multiple physical disk drive components into one or more logical units for the purposes of data redundancy, performance improvement, or both.[1] Data is distributed across the drives in one of several ways, referred to as RAID
RAID
levels, depending on the required level of redundancy and performance. The different schemes, or data distribution layouts, are named by the word "RAID" followed by a number, for example RAID 0 or RAID 1. Each schema, or RAID
RAID
level, provides a different balance among the key goals: reliability, availability, performance, and capacity
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Microsoft Windows
Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows is a group of several graphical operating system families, all of which are developed, marketed, and sold by Microsoft. Each family caters to a certain sector of the computing industry. Active Windows families include Windows NT
Windows NT
and Windows Embedded; these may encompass subfamilies, e.g. Windows Embedded
Windows Embedded
Compact (Windows CE) or Windows Server
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MacOS
macOS (/ˌmækoʊˈɛs/;[5] previously Mac OS X, then OS X) is a series of graphical operating systems developed and marketed by Apple Inc. since 2001. It is the primary operating system for Apple's Mac family of computers. Within the market of desktop, laptop and home computers, and by web usage, it is the second most widely used desktop OS, after Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows.[6][7] macOS is the second major series of Macintosh
Macintosh
operating systems. The first is colloquially called the "classic" Mac OS, which was introduced in 1984, and the final release of which was Mac OS 9
Mac OS 9
in 1999. The first desktop version, Mac OS X
Mac OS X
10.0, was released in March 2001, with its first update, 10.1, arriving later that year. After this, Apple began naming its releases after big cats, which lasted until OS X
OS X
10.8 Mountain Lion
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Linux Kernel
The Linux
Linux
kernel is an open-source monolithic Unix-like
Unix-like
computer operating system kernel. The Linux
Linux
family of operating systems is based on this kernel and deployed on both traditional computer systems such as personal computers and servers, usually in the form of Linux distributions,[9] and on various embedded devices such as routers, wireless access points, PBXes, set-top boxes, FTA receivers, smart TVs, PVRs, and NAS appliances. The Android operating system for tablet computers, smartphones, and smartwatches uses services provided by the Linux
Linux
kernel to implement its functionality. While the adoption on desktop computers is low, Linux-based operating systems dominate nearly every other segment of computing, from mobile devices to mainframes
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T13 Subcommittee
The InterNational Committee for Information Technology Standards (INCITS), (pronounced "insights"),[1] is an ANSI-accredited standards development organization composed of Information technology developers. It was formerly known as the X3 and NCITS. INCITS is the central U.S. forum dedicated to creating technology standards. INCITS is accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and is affiliated with the Information Technology Industry Council, a global policy advocacy organization that represents U.S. and global innovation companies. INCITS coordinates technical standards activity between ANSI
ANSI
in the USA and joint ISO/IEC committees worldwide. This provides a mechanism to create standards that will be implemented in many nations. As such, INCITS' executive board also serves as ANSI's Technical Advisory Group for ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1
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Solaris (operating System)
Solaris is a Unix
Unix
operating system originally developed by Sun Microsystems. It superseded their earlier SunOS
SunOS
in 1993. In 2010, after the Sun acquisition by Oracle, it was renamed Oracle Solaris.[2] Solaris is known for its scalability, especially on SPARC
SPARC
systems, and for originating many innovative features such as DTrace, ZFS
ZFS
and Time Slider.[3][4] Solaris supports SPARC
SPARC
and x86-64 workstations and servers from Oracle and other vendors. Solaris is registered as compliant with the Single UNIX Specification.[5] Historically, Solaris was developed as proprietary software
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OpenSolaris
OpenSolaris
OpenSolaris
(/ˌoʊpən səˈlɑːrɪs/[6]) is a discontinued, open source computer operating system based on Solaris created by Sun Microsystems. It was also the name of the project initiated by Sun to build a developer and user community around the software. After the acquisition of Sun Microsystems
Sun Microsystems
in 2010, Oracle decided to discontinue open development of the core software, and replaced the OpenSolaris distribution model with the proprietary Solaris Express. Prior to Oracle's moving of core development "behind closed doors", a group of former OpenSolaris
OpenSolaris
developers decided to fork the core software under the name OpenIndiana
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