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E-waste
Electronic waste
Electronic waste
or e-waste describes discarded electrical or electronic devices. Used electronics which are destined for reuse, resale, salvage, recycling, or disposal are also considered e-waste. Informal processing of e-waste in developing countries can lead to adverse human health effects and environmental pollution. Electronic scrap components, such as CPUs, contain potentially harmful components such as lead, cadmium, beryllium, or brominated flame retardants
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Waste Electrical And Electronic Equipment Directive
The Waste
Waste
Electrical
Electrical
and Electronic Equipment Directive (WEEE Directive) is the European Community
European Community
Directive 2012/19/EU on waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) which, together with the RoHS Directive 2002/95/EC, became European Law
European Law
in February 2003. The WEEE Directive set collection, recycling and recovery targets for all types of electrical goods, with a minimum rate of 4 kilograms per head of population per annum recovered for recycling by 2009. The RoHS Directive set restrictions upon European manufacturers as to the material content of new electronic equipment placed on the market. The symbol adopted by the European Council
European Council
to represent waste electrical and electronic equipment comprises a crossed-out wheelie bin with or without a single black line underneath the symbol
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Institute Of Scrap Recycling Industries
The Institute of Scrap
Scrap
Recycling
Recycling
Industries (ISRI) is a United States-based private, non-profit trade association representing more than 1,600 private and public for-profit companies – ranging from small, family-owned businesses to multi-national corporations—operating at more than 6,000 facilities in the United States and 30 countries worldwide. Its membership is made up of manufacturers and processors, brokers and industrial consumers of scrap commodities, including ferrous and nonferrous metals, paper, electronics, rubber, plastics, glass and textiles. ISRI's associate members include equipment and service providers to the scrap recycling industry
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Fair Trade
Fair trade
Fair trade
is a social movement whose stated goal is to help producers in developing countries achieve better trading conditions and to promote sustainable farming. Members of the movement advocate the payment of higher prices to exporters, as well as improved social and environmental standards. The movement focuses in particular on commodities, or products which are typically exported from developing countries to developed countries, but also consumed in domestic markets (e.g. Brazil, India
India
and Bangladesh) most notably handicrafts, coffee, cocoa, wine, sugar, fresh fruit, chocolate, flowers and gold.[1][2] The movement seeks to promote greater equity in international trading partnerships through dialogue, transparency, and respect
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The Waste Makers
The Waste Makers
The Waste Makers
is a 1960 book on consumerism by Vance Packard. It was bestselling when it was released. The book argues that people in the United States consume a lot more than they should and are harmed by their consumption.Contents1 Summary 2 Reviews 3 References 4 External linksSummary[edit] One reviewer summarized the book's thesis as follows:American society overemphasizes consumption, especially the quantity rather than the quality of what it consumes, and that it therefore sacrifices culture, prudence, and a proper concern for the future
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Vance Packard
Vance Oakley Packard (May 22, 1914 – December 12, 1996) was an American journalist and social critic. He was the author of several books, including The Hidden Persuaders. He was a critic of consumerism.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 The Hidden Persuaders3 Personal life and death 4 Publications 5 See also 6 Further reading 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Vance Packard was born on May 22, 1914 in Granville Summit, Pennsylvania, to Philip J. Packard and Mabel Case Packard.[1] Between 1920-32, he attended local public schools in State College, Pennsylvania, where his father managed a dairy farm owned by the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State College (later Penn State University).[1] He identified himself as a farm boy throughout his life, although he moved to State College and in later life lived in affluent areas.[2] In 1932, he entered Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State University, where he earned a B.A
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Pentium 4
Pentium
Pentium
4 is a brand by Intel
Intel
for an entire series of single-core CPUs for desktops, laptops and entry-level servers. The processors were shipped from November 20, 2000, until August 8, 2008.[1][2] All Pentium
Pentium
4 CPUs are based on the NetBurst architecture. The Pentium 4 Willamette (180 nm) introduced SSE2, while the Prescott (90 nm) introduced SSE3. Later versions of Prescott introduced Hyper-Threading Technology (HTT). The first Pentium
Pentium
4-branded processor to implement 6 4-bit
4-bit
was the Prescott (90 nm) (February 2004), but this feature was not enabled. Intel
Intel
subsequently began selling 6 4-bit
4-bit
Pentium
Pentium
4s using the "E0" revision of the Prescotts, being sold on the OEM market as the Pentium 4, model F
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Developing Nation
A developing country, also called a less developed country or an underdeveloped country, is a nation with a less developed industrial base and a low Human Development Index
Human Development Index
(HDI) relative to other countries.[1] However, this definition is not universally agreed upon. There is also no clear agreement on which countries fit this category.[2] A nation's GDP per capita
GDP per capita
compared with other nations can also be a reference point. The term "developing" describes a currently observed situation and not a changing dynamic or expected direction of progress. Since the late 1990s developing countries tended to demonstrate higher growth rates than developed countries.[3] There is criticism for using the term developing country. The term implies inferiority of a developing country or undeveloped country compared with a developed country, which many countries dislike
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Basel Convention
The Basel
Basel
Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal, usually known as the Basel Convention, is an international treaty that was designed to reduce the movements of hazardous waste between nations, and specifically to prevent transfer of hazardous waste from developed to less developed countries (LDCs). It does not, however, address the movement of radioactive waste. The Convention is also intended to minimize the amount and toxicity of wastes generated, to ensure their environmentally sound management as closely as possible to the source of generation, and to assist LDCs in environmentally sound management of the hazardous and other wastes they generate. The Convention was opened for signature on 22 March 1989, and entered into force on 5 May 1992. As of February 2018, 185 states and the European Union
European Union
are parties to the Convention
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Basel Ban
The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal, usually known as the Basel Convention, is an international treaty that was designed to reduce the movements of hazardous waste between nations, and specifically to prevent transfer of hazardous waste from developed to less developed countries (LDCs). It does not, however, address the movement of radioactive waste. The Convention is also intended to minimize the amount and toxicity of wastes generated, to ensure their environmentally sound management as closely as possible to the source of generation, and to assist LDCs in environmentally sound management of the hazardous and other wastes they generate. The Convention was opened for signature on 22 March 1989, and entered into force on 5 May 1992. As of February 2018, 185 states and the European Union are parties to the Convention
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Basel Action Network
The Basel Action Network
Basel Action Network
(BAN) is a charitable non-governmental organization working to combat the export of toxic waste from technology and other products from industrialized societies to developing countries. BAN is based in Seattle, Washington, United States, with a partner office in the Philippines. BAN is named after the Basel Convention, a United Nations
United Nations
treaty designed to control and prevent the dumping of toxic wastes, particularly on developing countries
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Container Ship
Container ships (sometimes spelled containerships) are cargo ships that carry all of their load in truck-size intermodal containers, in a technique called containerization. They are a common means of commercial intermodal freight transport and now carry most seagoing non-bulk cargo. Container ship
Container ship
capacity is measured in twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU). Typical loads are a mix of 20-foot and 40-foot (2-TEU) ISO-standard containers, with the latter predominant. Today, about 90% of non-bulk cargo worldwide is transported by container, and the largest modern container ships can carry over 21,000 TEU (e.g., OOCL
OOCL
Hong Kong)
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Arizona State University
Arizona
Arizona
State University
University
(commonly referred to as ASU or Arizona State) is a public metropolitan research university[9] on five campuses across the Phoenix metropolitan area,[10][11] and four regional learning centers throughout Arizona. The 2018 university ratings by U.S. News & World Report rank ASU No. 1 among the Most Innovative Schools in America for the third year in a row[12] and has ranked ASU No. 115 in National Universities with overall score of 47/100 with 83% of student applications accepted.[13] ASU is one of the largest public universities by enrollment in the U.S.[14] It had approximately 72,000 students enrolled in fall 2017, including 59,198 undergraduate and 12,630 graduate students.[15] ASU's charter, approved by the board of regents in 2014, is based on the "New American University" model created by ASU President Crow
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Modular Smartphones
A modular smartphone is a smartphone made using different components that can be independently upgraded or replaced in a modular design. This aims to reduce electronic waste, lower repair costs and increase user comfort.[1] The most important component is the main board, to which others (such as cameras or batteries) are attached. These are packaged in easy-to-remove modules which can be replaced as needed without having to rework the soldering.[2] Components could be obtained from open-source hardware stores.[3]Contents1 History 2 Derivatives 3 Components 4 Challenges 5 Modular phone platforms 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Desktop computers that used tower cases could easily swap parts such as hard drives, memory, and graphics cards. Among early mobile devices, the Handspring Visor PDA had a Springboard Expansion Slot which could give it the capabilities such as a phone, GPS, a modem, or a camera - but only one at a time
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Haiti
Coordinates: 19°00′N 72°25′W / 19.000°N 72.417°W / 19.000; -72.417 Republic
Republic
of HaitiRépublique d'Haïti  (French) Repiblik Ayiti  (Haitian Creole)FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Liberté, égalité, fraternité" (French)[1] "Libète, Egalite, Fratènite"  (Haitian Creole) "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity" Motto on traditional coat of arms: "L'union fait la force" (French) "Inite se fòs"  (Haitian Creole)[2] "Union makes strength"Anthem: La Dessalinienne  (French) Desalinyèn&
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Port Of New York And New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°40′06″N 74°02′44″W / 40.66833°N 74.04556°W / 40.66833; -74.04556 Port
Port
of New York and New Jersey Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal
Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal
on Newark Bay
Newark Bay
is the busiest container terminal on the East Coast of the United StatesDetailsDraft depth 50 feetAir draft 228 feet, restricted by the Verrazano Bridge 215 feet, restricted by the Bayonne BridgeThe Port
Port
of New York and New Jersey
New Jersey
is the port district of the New York-Newark metropolitan area, encompassing the region within approximately a 25-mile (40 km) radius of the Statue of Liberty National Monument
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