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Dynastic
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
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Mabel Wisse Smit
HRH Princess Beatrix *HRH Princess MabelCountess Luana Countess ZariaHRH Prince Constantijn * HRH Princess Laurentien *Countess Eloise Count Claus-Casimir Countess LeonoreExtended royal family HRH Princess IreneHRH The Duke of Parma HRH The Duchess of Parma HRH The Countess of Colorno HE The Count of Colorno HRH The Count of Bardi HRH The Countess of Bardi HRH The Marchioness of Sala HE The Marquess of SalaHRH Princess Margriet * Professor Pieter van Vollenhoven
Pieter van Vollenhoven
*HH Prince
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Rain Queen
The Modjadji or Rain Queen
Rain Queen
is the hereditary queen of Balobedu, a people of the Limpopo Province
Limpopo Province
of South Africa. The succession to the position of Rain Queen
Rain Queen
is matrilineal so her eldest daughter is the heir, and males are not entitled to inherit the throne at all. The Rain Queen
Rain Queen
is believed to have special powers, including the ability to control the clouds and rainfall. Currently, there is no ruling Rain Queen
Rain Queen
as the previous Rain Queen died on 12 June 2005
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Patrilineality
Patrilineality, also known as the male line, the spear side[1] or agnatic kinship, is a common kinship system in which an individual's family membership derives from and is recorded through his or her father's lineage. It generally involves the inheritance of property, rights, names or titles by persons related through male kin. A patriline ("father line") is a person's father, and additional ancestors, as traced only through males.Contents1 In the Bible 2 Agnatic succession 3 Salic Law 4 Genetic genealogy 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksIn the Bible[edit] In the Bible, family and tribal membership appears to be transmitted through the father. For example, a person is considered to be a priest or Levite if his father is a priest or Levite, and the members of all the twelve tribes are called Israelites because their father is Israel (Jacob)
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Franks
The Franks
Franks
(Latin: Franci or Latin: gens Francorum) were a collection of Germanic peoples, whose name was first mentioned in 3rd century Roman sources, associated with tribes on the Lower and Middle Rhine
Middle Rhine
in the 3rd century AD, on the edge of the Roman Empire. Later the term is associated with Romanized Germanic dynasties within the collapsing Roman Empire, who eventually commanded the whole region between the rivers Loire
Loire
and Rhine, and imposed power over many other post-Roman kingdoms and Germanic peoples, later being recognized by the Catholic church as successors to the old rulers of the Western Roman Empire.[1][2][3][a] Although the Frankish name only appears in the 3rd century, at least some of the original Frankish tribes had long been known under their own names to the Romans, both as allies providing soldiers, and as enemies
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Salic Law
The Salic law
Salic law
(/ˈsælɪk/ or /ˈseɪlɪk/; Latin: Lex salica), or the Salian law, was the ancient Salian Frankish civil law code compiled around AD 500 by the first Frankish King, Clovis. Written in Latin, or in "semi-French Latin" according to some linguists,[1] it also contains what Dutch linguists describe as one of the earliest known records of Old Dutch, perhaps second only to the Bergakker inscription.[2] It remained the basis of Frankish law throughout the early Medieval period, and influenced future European legal systems. The best-known tenet of the old law is the principle of exclusion of women from inheritance of thrones, fiefs and other property. The Salic laws were arbitrated by a committee appointed and empowered by the King of the Franks
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Succession Law
An order of succession is the sequence of those entitled to hold a high office such as head of state or an honour such as a title of nobility in the order in which they stand in line to it when it becomes vacated.[1] This sequence may be regulated through descent or by statute.[1] Hereditary government
Hereditary government
form differs from elected government. An established order of succession is the normal way of passing on hereditary positions, and also provides immediate continuity after an unexpected vacancy in cases where office-holders are chosen by election: the office does not have to remain vacant until a successor is elected. In some cases the successor takes up the full role of the previous office-holder, as in the case of the presidency of many countries; in other non-hereditary cases there is not a full succession, but a caretaker chosen by succession criteria assumes some or all of the responsibilities, but not the formal office, of the position
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De Jure
In law and government, de jure (/deɪ ˈdʒʊərɪ/ or /dɪ ˈdʒʊərɪ/; Latin: de iure, lit. 'in law' Latin pronunciation: [deː juːre]) describes practices that are legally recognised, whether or not the practices exist in reality.[1] In contrast, de facto ("in fact" or "in practice") describes situations that exist in reality, even if not legally recognised.[2] The terms are often used to contrast different scenarios: for a colloquial example, "I know that, de jure, this is supposed to be a parking lot, but now that the flood has left four feet of water here, it's a de facto swimming pool".[3] Examples[edit] It is possible to have multiple simultaneous conflicting (de jure) legalities, possibly none of which is in force (de facto). After seizing power in 1526, Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
made his brother, Umar Din, the lawful (de jure) Sultan
Sultan
of Adal
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House Of Windsor
The House of Windsor
House of Windsor
is the royal house of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the other Commonwealth realms. The dynasty is of German paternal descent and was originally a branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, itself derived from the House of Wettin, and it succeeded the House of Hanover as monarchs in the British Empire
British Empire
following the death of Queen Victoria, wife of Albert, Prince Consort. The houses of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and Windsor have provided five British monarchs to date, including four kings and the present queen, Elizabeth II. The name was changed from Saxe-Coburg and Gotha to the English Windsor in 1917 because of anti-German sentiment in the British Empire
British Empire
during World War I.[1] During the reign of the Windsors, major changes took place in British society
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Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
(Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926)[a] is Queen of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the other Commonwealth realms. Elizabeth was born in London as the first child of the Duke and Duchess of York, later King George VI
George VI
and Queen Elizabeth, and she was educated privately at home. Her father acceded to the throne on the abdication of his brother King Edward VIII
King Edward VIII
in 1936, from which time she was the heir presumptive. She began to undertake public duties during the Second World War, serving in the Auxiliary Territorial Service
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Monarchy Of The Netherlands
The monarchy of the Netherlands
Netherlands
is constitutional and as such, the role and position of the monarch are defined and limited by the Constitution of the Netherlands
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Grand Duchess Anna Petrovna Of Russia
Grand Duchess Anna Petrovna of Russia, Tsesarevna
Tsesarevna
of Russia
Russia
(Anna Petrovna Romanova) Russian: Анна Петровна; 27 January 1708, in Moscow
Moscow
– 4 March 1728, in Kiel) was the elder daughter of Emperor Peter I of Russia
Russia
and Empress Catherine I of Russia. Her sister, Elizabeth of Russia, ruled as Empress between 1741 and 1762. While a potential heir in the reign of her father and her mother, she never acceded to the throne due to political reasons. However, her son Peter would rule as Emperor in 1762, succeeding Elizabeth
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Matrilineal Succession
Matrilineal succession is a form of hereditary succession or other inheritance through which the subject's female relatives are traced back in a matrilineal line.Contents1 Systems 2 Other examples2.1 Matrilineal succession in Africa 2.2 Matrilineal succession in Asia3 Consequences 4 ReferencesSystems[edit]matrilineal primogeniture where the eldest female child o
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Dynasty (other)
A dynasty is a series of rulers from one family. Dynasty
Dynasty
may also refer to:Contents1 Arts and media1.1 Film and television 1.2 Music 1.3 Other media2 Technology 3 Other 4 See alsoArts and media[edit] Film and television[edit] Dynasty
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Ancient Greek
The ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in Ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BCE to the 6th century CE. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BCE), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BCE), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BCE to the 4th century CE). It is antedated in the second millennium BCE by Mycenaean Greek
Mycenaean Greek
and succeeded by Medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage on its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Order Of Succession
An order of succession is the sequence of those entitled to hold a high office such as head of state or an honour such as a title of nobility in the order in which they stand in line to it when it becomes vacated.[1] This sequence may be regulated through descent or by statute.[1] Hereditary government
Hereditary government
form differs from elected government. An established order of succession is the normal way of passing on hereditary positions, and also provides immediate continuity after an unexpected vacancy in cases where office-holders are chosen by election: the office does not have to remain vacant until a successor is elected. In some cases the successor takes up the full role of the previous office-holder, as in the case of the presidency of many countries; in other non-hereditary cases there is not a full succession, but a caretaker chosen by succession criteria assumes some or all of the responsibilities, but not the formal office, of the position
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