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Dwight D. Eisenhower
World War II Supreme Allied Commander in EuropeD-Day Operation OverlordSurrender of Germany VE-DayCrusade in EuropePresident of the United StatesPresidencyFirst TermDraft movement1952 CampaignElection1st InaugurationKorean War Atoms for PeaceCold WarNew Look Domino theoryInterstate Highway SystemSecond Term1956 campaignElection2nd InaugurationEisenhower Doctrine Sputnik
Sputnik
crisis Missile gapNDEA NASA DARPACivil Rights Act of 1957 Little Rock NineU-2 incident Farewell AddressPost-PresidencyLegacy Presidential library and museum Tributes and memorialsv t eDwight David "Ike" Eisenhower (/ˈaɪzənhaʊ.ər/ EYE-zən-how-ər; October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American army general and statesman who served as the 34th President of the United States from 1953 to 1961
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Congestive Heart Failure
Heart
Heart
failure (HF), often referred to as congestive heart failure (CHF), is when the heart is unable to pump sufficiently to maintain blood flow to meet the body's needs.[9][10][11] Signs and symptoms commonly include shortness of breath, excessive tiredness, and leg swelling.[2] The shortness of breath is usually worse with exercise, while lying down, and may wake the person at night.[2] A limited ability to exercise is also a common feature.[12] Chest pain, including angina, does not typically occur due to heart failure.[13] Common causes of heart failure include coronary artery disease including a previous myocardial infarction (heart attack), high blood pressure, atrial fib
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German Instrument Of Surrender
The German Instrument of Surrender
German Instrument of Surrender
ended World War II in Europe. The definitive text was signed in Karlshorst, Berlin, on the night of 8 May 1945 by representatives of the three armed services of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht
Oberkommando der Wehrmacht
(OKW) and the Allied Expeditionary Force together with the Supreme High Command of the Red Army, with further French and US representatives signing as witnesses. The signing took place 9 May 1945 at 00:16 local time. An earlier version of the text had been signed in a ceremony in Reims in the early hours of 7 May 1945. In the West, 8 May is known as Victory in Europe Day, whereas in post-Soviet states the Victory Day is celebrated on 9 May. There were three language versions of the surrender document
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World War II Victory Medal (United States)
The World War II Victory Medal is a service medal of the United States military which was established by an Act of Congress on 6 July 1945 (Public Law 135, 79th Congress) and promulgated by Section V, War Department Bulletin 12, 1945.[1][2] The corresponding medal from World War I
World War I
is the World War I
World War I
Victory Medal.Contents1 History 2 Criteria 3 Appearance 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The World War II Victory Medal was first issued as a service ribbon referred to as the “Victory Ribbon.” The World War II Victory Medal was established by an Act of Congress on 6 July 1945 (Public Law 135, 79th Congress) and promulgated by Section V, War Department Bulletin 12, 1945. The medal was designed by Mr. Thomas H. Jones and approved by the Secretary of War on 5 February 1946
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World War I Victory Medal (United States)
served in the armed forces between the following dates, in the following locations:6 April 1917 to 11 November 1918 for any military service. 12 November 1918, to 5 August 1919 for service in European Russia 23 November 1918, to 1 April 1920 for service with the American Expeditionary Force SiberiaStatus InactiveStatisticsEstablishedby an Act of Congress, 1919, and promulgated by War Department General Order 48, 1919, which was rescinded by War Department General Order 83, 30 June 1919. [1]First awarded April 1921 (retroactive)[1] Service ribbon
Service ribbon
and campaign streamerA photo showing the state of a U.S. Victory Medal in 2012.The World War I
World War I
Victory Medal is a service medal of the United States military which was first created in 1919, designed by James Earle Fraser. The medal was originally intended to be created due to an act of the United States Congress
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Victory In Europe Day
Victory in Europe
Europe
Day, generally known as V-E Day, VE Day or simply V Day, was the public holiday celebrated on 8 May 1945 to mark the formal acceptance by the Allies of World War II
Allies of World War II
of Nazi Germany's unconditional surrender of its armed forces. The formal surrender of the German forces occupying the Channel Islands
Channel Islands
did not occur until the following day, 9 May 1945. It thus marked the end of World War II in Europe. The term VE Day existed as early as September 1944,[3] in anticipation of victory. On 30 April 1945, Adolf Hitler, the Nazi leader, committed suicide during the Battle of Berlin. Germany's surrender, therefore, was authorised by his successor, Reichspräsident
Reichspräsident
Karl Dönitz. The administration headed by Dönitz was known as the Flensburg Government
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Legion Of Merit
The Legion of Merit
Legion of Merit
(LOM) is a military award of the United States Armed Forces that is given for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. The decoration is issued to members of the seven uniformed services of the United States[5] as well as to military and political figures of foreign governments. The Legion of Merit
Legion of Merit
(Commander degree) is one of only two United States military decorations to be issued as a neck order (the other being the Medal of Honor) and the only United States military decoration which may be issued in award degrees (much like an order of chivalry or certain Orders of Merit).[6][7] The Legion of Merit
Legion of Merit
is sixth in the order of precedence of all U.S. military awards and is worn after the Defense Superior Service Medal and before the Distinguished Flying Cross.[8] In contemporary use in the U.S
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Distinguished Service Medal (United States Navy)
The Navy Distinguished Service Medal is a military decoration of the United States Navy
United States Navy
and United States Marine Corps
United States Marine Corps
which was first created in 1919. The medal is presented to recognize distinguished and exceptionally meritorious service to the United States while serving in a duty or position of great responsibility.[6] The award is the Navy and Marine Corps equivalent to the Army Distinguished Service Medal, the Air Force Distinguished Service Medal, and the Coast Guard Distinguished Service Medal
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Distinguished Service Medal (U.S. Army)
The Distinguished Service Medal (DSM)[2] is a military award of the United States Army
United States Army
that is presented to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the United States military, has distinguished himself by exceptionally meritorious service to the Government in a duty of great responsibility. The performance must be such as to merit recognition for service that is clearly exceptional. Exceptional performance of normal duty will not alone justify an award of this decoration.[3] Separate Distinguished Service Medals exist for the different branches of the military as well as a fifth version of the medal which is a senior award of the United States Department of Defense
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General Of The Army (United States)
General of the Army (abbreviated as GA)[1] is a five-star general officer and the second highest possible rank in the United States Army. A General of the Army ranks immediately above a general and is equivalent to a Fleet Admiral and a General
General
of the Air Force.[2] There is no established equivalent five-star rank in the other federal uniformed services (Marine Corps, Coast Guard, United States
United States
Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps). Often called a "five-star general", the rank of General of the Army has historically been reserved for wartime use and is not currently active in the U.S. military. The General of the Army insignia consisted of five 3/8th inch stars in a pentagonal pattern, with points touching
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