HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Dutch–Portuguese War
Treaty of HagueFormation of the Dutch Empire Portuguese Restoration War Portuguese victory in South America and Southwest Africa Dutch victory in Guinea and IndonesiaBelligerents Kingdom of Portugal Supported by:  Crown of Castile (until 1640)  Kingdom of Cochin Potiguara Tupis Ming China  Dutch Republic Supported by:  Kingdom of England (until 1640) Johor Sultanate Kingdom of Kandy Kingdom of Kongo Kingdom of Ndongo Rio Grande Tupis Nhandui Tarairiu Tribe Ayutthaya Kingdom (Siam)Commanders and leaders Pedro da Silva António Teles de Meneses Nuno Álvares Botelho Matias de Albuquerque Martim Afonso de Castro Fadrique de Toledo Osório Salvador de Sá John Maurice of Nassau Piet Pieterszoon Hein Cornelis Matelief de Jonge Adam Westerwolt Gerard Pietersz
[...More...]

"Dutch–Portuguese War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Portuguese Navy
Personnel: Military: 8900 [1] Paramilitary: 1000 Civilian: 2700 Equipment: Frigates: 5 Submarines: 2 Patrol vessels: 21 Landing craft: 1 Support ships: 1 Research vessels: 4 Sail ships: 3 Auxiliary vessels: 50 Helicopters: 5Part of Portuguese Armed ForcesGarrison/HQ Lisbon Naval BasePatron Henry the NavigatorMotto(s) Ships motto: Honrai a Pátria que a Pátria vos contempla (Honor the Fatherland for the Fatherland beholds you) Heraldic motto: Talant de bien faire (Talent of doing well) Battle cry: São Jorge (Saint George)Anniversaries 12 December 1317 (Creation of the Portuguese Royal Navy
[...More...]

"Portuguese Navy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Capture Of Bahia
The capture of Bahia was a military engagement between Portugal
Portugal
(at that time, united with Spain in the Iberian Union) and the Dutch West India Company, occurred in 1624, that ended in the capture of the Brazilian city of Salvador da Bahia by the latter. This capture was part of the Groot Desseyn plan of the Dutch West India Company. Although the Dutch intentions were reported to the Spanish no preventive counter-action was taken by them.Contents1 Prelude 2 Capture 3 Aftermath 4 Sources 5 ReferencesPrelude[edit] On December 22, 1623, a Dutch fleet under the command of Admiral Jacob Willekens and Vice Admiral Pieter Heyn and consisting of 35 ships, sailed from Texel
Texel
carrying 6,500 men.[1] 13 were owned by the United Provinces, while the rest belonged to the WIC; these vessels were en route to Cape Verde,[2] where they arrived after being scattered by a storm
[...More...]

"Capture Of Bahia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Alauddin Riayat Shah II
Sultan
Sultan
Alauddin Riayat Shah II ibni Almarhum Sultan
Sultan
Mahmud Shah (died 1564) was the first Sultan
Sultan
of Johor. He ruled Johor
Johor
from 1528 to 1564. He founded the Johor Sultanate
Johor Sultanate
following the fall of Malacca to the Portuguese in 1511. He was the second son of Mahmud Shah of Malacca. Thus, Johor
Johor
was a successor state of Malacca and Johor's sultans follow the numbering system of Malacca
[...More...]

"Alauddin Riayat Shah II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Abdullah Ma'ayat Shah
Sultan Abdullah Ma'ayat Shah was the 6th Sultan of Johor
Sultan of Johor
who reigned from 1615 to 1623. Before he became sultan of Johor, Abdullah Ma'ayat Shah was also known as Raja Bongsu, Raja Seberang or Raja di Ilir. According to the testimony of Dutch Admiral Cornelis Matelief de Jonge
Cornelis Matelief de Jonge
Raja Bongsu was one of four surviving sons of Raja Ali bin Abdul Jalil (alias Raja Omar) of Johor
[...More...]

"Abdullah Ma'ayat Shah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Abdul Jalil Shah III
Sultan Abdul Jalil Shah III ibni Almarhum Sultan Alauddin Riayat Shah III was the 7th Sultan of Johor
Sultan of Johor
who reigned from 1623 to 1677. Known as "Raja Bujang" before his accession, he was a son of the 5th Sultan, Alauddin Riayat Shah III and a nephew of the 6th Sultan, Abdullah Ma'ayat Shah.[1] Ruler of Pahang and Sultan of Johor-Pahang[edit] In 1615, Alauddin Riayat Shah III signed a peace treaty with the Portuguese Malacca, and as a sign of gratitude, the Portuguese recognised Raja Bujang as the ruler of Pahang, replacing Alauddin Riayat Shah who was deposed earlier in 1615 by the Acehnese. However, the appointment was not recognised by Sultan Iskandar Muda
Sultan Iskandar Muda
of Acheh, which later invaded Pahang and forced Raja Bujang to flee to the islands of Lingga
[...More...]

"Abdul Jalil Shah III" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

George Clifford, 3rd Earl Of Cumberland
Cumberland (/ˈkʌmbərlənd/ KUM-bər-lənd; locally /ˈkʊmbələnd/ KUUM-bə-lənd) is a historic county of North West England that had an administrative function from the 12th century until 1974. It was bordered by Northumberland to the east, County Durham to the southeast, Westmorland and Lancashire to the south, and the Scottish counties of Dumfriesshire and Roxburghshire to the north
[...More...]

"George Clifford, 3rd Earl Of Cumberland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Songtham
Songtham (Thai: ทรงธรรม) was the King of Ayutthaya from 1620 to 1628 of the House of Sukhōday. His reign marked the prosperity of the Ayutthaya kingdom after it regained independence from Toungoo Dynasty, and saw the commencement of trade with foreign nations especially the Dutch and the Japanese. Songtham filled his guards with foreign mercenaries most notably the Japanese – Yamada Nagamasa.Contents1 Origin 2 Rebellion 3 Religious viewpoints 4 Martial affairs 5 Foreign Relations 6 Dutch ship 7 Successor 8 ReferencesOrigin[edit] Inthraracha was the eldest son of Ekatotsarot with his first class concubine. He was in the priesthood for 8 years before government servants asked his to leave and ascend the throne with the title Phrachao Songtham at the age of 29.[1]:205–206 Rebellion[edit] Ekatotsarot died in 1620 and was succeed by Si Saowaphak. Ruling less than a year, and showing no ability, he was murdered
[...More...]

"Songtham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Battle Of Bantam
The naval Battle of Bantam took place on 27 December 1601 in Bantam Bay, Indonesia, when an exploration fleet of 5 Dutch under the leadership of Walter Harmensz. and a fleet under Andrea Furtado de Mendoça, sent from Goa to the Portuguese authority to restore, met in the Indonesian archipelago. The Portuguese were forced to retreat.[1] Netherlands
Netherlands
made three ships booty on a large Portuguese force majeure of eight galleons and miscellaneous smaller vessels. Ships involved[edit]NetherlandsGelderland Zeelandia (Jan Cornelisz) Utrecht Wachter (yacht) Duyfken
Duyfken
(yacht) Portugal
Portugal
(André Furtado de Mendonça), 30 vessels total8 galleons several fustas (similar to galleys) - 3 set alight and captured by DutchReferences[edit]^ "Hoe en waarom voerde de voc oorlog in Indie". Batavia Werf (in Dutch)
[...More...]

"Battle Of Bantam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Siege Of Malacca (1606)
The Siege of Malacca of 1606 was a military engagement between a Dutch force commanded by Cornelis Matelief and the Portuguese commander André Furtado de Mendonça. The small Portuguese garrison managed to hold out and stop any Dutch direct attacks on the city until additional reinforcements could arrive led by Martim Afonso de Castro, which made the Dutch retreat from the siege
[...More...]

"Siege Of Malacca (1606)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battle Of Cape Rachado
 Dutch Republic Dutch East India CompanyCommanders and leaders Martim Afonso de Castro Cornelis Matelief de JongeStrength20 ships 11 shipsCasualties and losses2 ships lost 500 dead 2 ships lost 150 dead, many woundedv t eDutch–Portuguese WarBantam 1st Malacca Cape Rachado Swally Macau 1st Bahia Persian Gulf 2nd Bahia 1st Elmina 1st Recife Albrolhos 2nd Elmina Goa 3rd Bahia 4th Bahia Mormugão Itamaracá Galle 2nd Malacca 1st Luanda Tabocas Kombi 2nd Luanda 1st Guararapes 2nd Guararapes 2nd Recife 1st Colombo 2nd Colombov t eDutch colonial campaignsBantam (1601) Malacca
[...More...]

"Battle Of Cape Rachado" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battle Of Swally
Kingdom of England East India
India
Company Portuguese EmpireCommanders and leadersCaptain Thomas Best UnknownStrengthFour galleons Four naus, 26 barquesv t ePortuguese battles in the Indian OceanCannanore (1501) Calicut (1502) Pandarane (1504) Cochin (1504) Cannanore (1506) Anjadiva (1506) Ormuz (1507) Cannanore (1507) Chaul (1508) Dabul (1508) Diu (1509) Goa
[...More...]

"Battle Of Swally" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battle Of Macau
Portuguese EmpirePortuguese MacauCommanders and leadersCornelis Reijersen, Hans Ruffijn † Lopo Sarmento de CarvalhoStrength1,300 (landing force of 800) 13 ships ~150 Portuguese troops Unknown number of black slavesCasualties and losses300+ killed (136 Dutch) 126 wounded 4 ships sunk 6 Iberians killed Small number of black slaves killed ~20 woundedv t eDutch colonial campaignsBantam (1601) Malacca (1606) Cape Rachado (1606) Banda Islands
Banda Islands
(1621) Macau (1622)
[...More...]

"Battle Of Macau" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Action Of 1 February 1625
The Action of one February 1625 was a naval engagement between a Portuguese fleet and an allied Anglo-Dutch fleet, that took place on 1 to 24 February 1625 in the Persian gulf
[...More...]

"Action Of 1 February 1625" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cornelis Matelief De Jonge
Cornelis Matelief de Jonge
Cornelis Matelief de Jonge
(c. 1569 – October 17, 1632) was a Dutch admiral who was active in establishing Dutch power in Southeast Asia during the beginning of the 17th century. His fleet was officially on a trading mission, but its true intent was to destroy Portuguese power in the area. The fleet had 1400 men on board, including 600 soldiers. Matelieff did not succeed in this. The Dutch would ultimately gain control of Malacca
Malacca
more than thirty years later, again joining forces with the Sultanate of Johor, and a new ally Aceh, in 1641. He was born and died in Rotterdam.Contents1 Account1.1 First battle of Malacca
Malacca
(August 1606) 1.2 Second battle of Malacca
Malacca
(Sept
[...More...]

"Cornelis Matelief De Jonge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Recapture Of Bahia
Iberian Union Kingdom of Portugal  Crown of Castile United Provinces English and French volunteers[1][2]Commanders and leaders Fadrique de Toledo Willem Schoutens Hans KyffStrength12,000 men 52 ships[1][3][4] 3,000 to 5,000 men[2] 18 ships[5][6]Casualties and lossesAt least 71 killed and 64 wounded[5][6] Unknown killed or wounded 1,912 captured 12 ships sunk 6 ships captured 260 guns captured[6][7]v t eDutch Revolt (Eighty Years' War)Western EuropeOosterweel Dahlen Heiligerlee Jemmingen Jodoigne Brielle Mons Goes 1st Mechelen Middelburg Haarlem Alkmaar 1st Geertruidenberg Leiden Delft Valkenburg Mookerheyde Schoonhoven Zierikzee 1st Antwerp Gembloux Rijmenam 1st Deventer Borgerhout 1st Maastricht 2nd Mechelen 1st Steenwijk Kollum 1st Breda Noordhorn Niezijl Lochem Lier Eindhoven Steenbergen Aalst 2nd Antwerp Arnhem Empel Boksum 1st Grave 1st Venlo Axel Neuss 1st Rheinberg 1st Zutphen 1st Sl
[...More...]

"Recapture Of Bahia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.