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Dudley Museum And Art Gallery
Dudley
Dudley
Museum
Museum
and Art Gallery was a public museum and art gallery located in the town centre of Dudley
Dudley
in the West Midlands, England. It was opened in 1883, situated within buildings on St James's Road, and remained at that site until closure in 2016.[1]Contents1 Permanent exhibitions1.1 Geology 1.2 Return of the Dinosaurs 1.3 The Brooke Robinson Museum 1.4 Duncan Edwards
Duncan Edwards
and local heroes 1.5 Fine art
Fine art
collection2 Closure 3 References 4 External linksPermanent exhibitions[edit] Geology[edit] The geology exhibits were the 'most important collection' at the museum and were drawn from a collection of approximately 15,000 fossils from the local area including nearby Wren's Nest
Wren's Nest
hill and Wren's Nest
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Thecodontosaurus
? Agrosaurus
Agrosaurus
Seeley, 1891 Thecodontosaurus
Thecodontosaurus
("socket-tooth lizard") is a genus of herbivorous basal sauropodomorph dinosaur that lived during the late Triassic period ( Rhaetian
Rhaetian
age). Its remains are known mostly from Triassic
Triassic
"fissure fillings" in South England. Thecodontosaurus
Thecodontosaurus
was a small bipedal animal, about 2 m (6.5 ft) long. It is one of the first dinosaurs that were discovered and one of the oldest that existed
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Fine Art
In European academic traditions, fine art is art developed primarily for aesthetics or beauty, distinguishing it from applied art, which also has to serve some practical function, such as pottery or most metalwork. Historically, the five main fine arts were painting, sculpture, architecture, music, and poetry, with performing arts including theatre and dance.[1] Today, the fine arts commonly include additional forms, such as film, photography, video production/editing, design, sequential art, conceptual art, and printmaking. One definition of fine art is "a visual art considered to have been created primarily for aesthetic and intellectual purposes and judged for its beauty and meaningfulness, specifically, painting, sculpture, drawing, watercolor, graphics, and architecture."[2] In that sense, there are conceptual differences between the fine arts and the applied arts
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Munich Air Disaster
The Munich
Munich
air disaster occurred on 6 February 1958 when British European Airways Flight 609 crashed on its third attempt to take off from a slush-covered runway at Munich-Riem Airport, West Germany. On the plane was the Manchester United football team, nicknamed the "Busby Babes", along with supporters and journalists.[1] Twenty of the 44 on the aircraft died at the scene. The injured, some unconscious, were taken to the Rechts der Isar Hospital
Rechts der Isar Hospital
in Munich
Munich
where three more died, resulting in 23 fatalities with 21 survivors. The team was returning from a European Cup match in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, having eliminated Red Star Belgrade
Belgrade
to advance to the semi-finals of the competition
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England National Football Team
The England
England
national football team represents England
England
in international football and is controlled by The Football Association, the governing body for football in England.[2][3] England
England
are one of the two oldest national teams in football; alongside Scotland, whom they played in the world's first international football match in 1872. England's home ground is Wembley Stadium, London, and their headquarters is at St George's Park, Burton upon Trent. The teams current manager is Gareth Southgate
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Manchester United F.C.
Manchester United Football Club is a professional football club based in Old Trafford, Greater Manchester, England, that competes in the Premier League, the top flight of English football. Nicknamed "the Red Devils", the club was founded as Newton Heath
Newton Heath
LYR Football Club in 1878, changed its name to Manchester United in 1902 and moved to its current stadium, Old Trafford, in 1910. Manchester United have won a record 20 League titles, 12 FA Cups, 5 League Cups and a record 21 FA Community Shields. The club has also won three UEFA
UEFA
Champions Leagues, one UEFA
UEFA
Europa League, one UEFA
UEFA
Cup Winners' Cup, one UEFA
UEFA
Super Cup, one Intercontinental Cup and one FIFA Club World Cup
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Football League
The English Football League
English Football League
(EFL) is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England
England
and Wales. Founded in 1888 as the Football League, the league is the oldest such competition in world football. It was the top-level football league in England
England
from its foundation in the 19th century until 1992, when the top 22 clubs split away to form the Premier League. The three leagues below the Premiership League are known as the Championship, League One and League Two, with 24 clubs in each division - 72 clubs in total
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Busby Babes
The "Busby Babes" is the name given to the group of footballers, recruited and trained by Manchester United F.C.
Manchester United F.C.
chief scout Joe Armstrong and assistant manager Jimmy Murphy, who progressed from the club's youth team into the first team under the management of the eponymous Matt Busby
Matt Busby
from the late 1940s and throughout the 1950s. History[edit] The Busby Babes
Busby Babes
were notable not only for being young and gifted, but for being developed by the club itself, rather than bought from other clubs, which was customary then
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Inro
An inrō (印籠) (plural the same) is a traditional Japanese case for holding small objects, suspended from the obi (sash) worn around the waist. They are often highly decorated, in a variety of materials and techniques, in particular often using lacquer. Because traditional Japanese robes lacked pockets, objects were often carried by hanging them from the obi in containers known as sagemono (a Japanese generic term for a hanging object attached to a sash). Most sagemono were created for specialized contents, such as tobacco, pipes, writing brush and ink, but the type known as inrō was suitable for carrying anything small. The term inrō derives from the Sino-Japanese roots in (from Middle Chinese 'jin 印 "seal") and rō (MC luwng 籠 "cage"). In English the word may be italicized,[1] or not.[2] American English tends to favour the former, British English the latter.Inro with Cranes Soaring by Mount Fuji, and Netsuke of a Turtle
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Netsuke
Netsuke
Netsuke
(根付) [netsɯke] are miniature sculptures that were invented in 17th-century Japan
Japan
to serve a practical function (the two Japanese characters ne+tsuke mean "root" and "to attach"). In English the word may be italicized or not, with American English
American English
tending to favour the former and British English
British English
the latter.[1][2] Traditional Japanese garments—robes called kosode and kimono—had no pockets; however, men who wore them needed a place to store their personal belongings, such as pipes, tobacco, money, seals, or medicines. Their solution was to place such objects in containers (called sagemono) hung by cords from the robes' sashes (obi). The containers may have been pouches or small woven baskets, but the most popular were beautifully crafted boxes (inrō), which were held shut by ojime, which were sliding beads on cords
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West Midlands (county)
The West Midlands is a metropolitan county and city region in western central England
England
with a 2014 estimated population of 2,808,356,[2] making it the second most populous county in England. It came into existence as a metropolitan county in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972, formed from parts of Staffordshire, Worcestershire
Worcestershire
and Warwickshire. The county itself is a NUTS 2 region within the wider NUTS 1 region of the same name
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Baryonyx
Baryonyx
Baryonyx
(/ˌbæriˈɒnɪks/) is a genus of theropod dinosaur which lived in the Barremian
Barremian
stage of the early Cretaceous
Cretaceous
Period, about 130–125 million years ago. The holotype specimen was discovered in 1983 in Surrey, England, and the animal was named B. walkeri in 1986. The genus name, Baryonyx, means "heavy claw" and alludes to the animal's very large claw on the first finger; the specific name (walkeri) refers to its discoverer, amateur fossil hunter William J. Walker. Fragmentary specimens were later discovered in other parts of the United Kingdom and Iberia
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Cephalopods
A cephalopod (/ˈsɛfələpɒd, ˈkɛf-/) is any member of the molluscan class Cephalopoda (Greek plural κεφαλόποδα, kephalópoda; "head-feet") such as a squid, octopus or nautilus. These exclusively marine animals are characterized by bilateral body symmetry, a prominent head, and a set of arms or tentacles (muscular hydrostats) modified from the primitive molluscan foot. Fishermen sometimes call them inkfish, referring to their common ability to squirt ink. The study of cephalopods is a branch of malacology known as teuthology. Cephalopods became dominant during the Ordovician
Ordovician
period, represented by primitive nautiloids. The class now contains two, only distantly related, extant subclasses: Coleoidea, which includes octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish; and Nautiloidea, represented by Nautilus
Nautilus
and Allonautilus
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Trilobites
Trilobites ( /ˈtraɪləˌbaɪt, ˈtrɪ-, -loʊ-/;[4][5] meaning "three lobes") are a fossil group of extinct marine arachnomorph arthropods that form the class Trilobita. Trilobites form one of the earliest known groups of arthropods. The first appearance of trilobites in the fossil record defines the base of the Atdabanian stage of the Early Cambrian
Cambrian
period (521 million years ago), and they flourished throughout the lower Paleozoic
Paleozoic
era before beginning a drawn-out decline to extinction when, during the Devonian, all trilobite orders except the Proetids died out. Trilobites disappeared in the mass extinction at the end of the Permian
Permian
about 252 million years ago
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