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Duchess Theatre
The Duchess Theatre
Duchess Theatre
is a West End theatre
West End theatre
in the City of Westminster, London, located in Catherine Street
Catherine Street
near Aldwych. The theatre opened on 25 November 1929 and is one of the smallest West End theatres with a proscenium arch. It has 494 seats on two levels. It is a Grade II Listed Building.[2]Contents1 History 2 Notable productions 3 Production history 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Duchess Theatre
Duchess Theatre
was designed by Ewen Barr and constructed by F. G. Minter Ltd for Arthur Gibbons. The theatre is built with the stalls below street level, both to overcome the scale of the site and to maintain the rights of neighbours to ancient lights
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Jessica Tandy
Jessica Tandy
Jessica Tandy
(born Jessie Alice Tandy; 7 June 1909 – 11 September 1994) was a British stage and film actress. She appeared in over 100 stage productions and had more than 60 roles in film and TV.[1][2] Born in London
London
to Jessie Helen Horspool and commercial traveller Harry Tandy, she was only 18 when she made her professional debut on the London
London
stage in 1927. During the 1930s, she appeared in a large number of plays in London's West End, playing roles such as Ophelia
Ophelia
(opposite John Gielgud's legendary Hamlet) and Katherine (opposite Laurence Olivier's Henry V).[1] During this period, she also worked in a couple of British films. Following the end of her marriage to the British actor Jack Hawkins, she moved to New York in 1940, where she met Canadian actor Hume Cronyn
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WC Postcode Area
Postcode district boundaries: Google Template:Attached KML/WC postcode area KML is from Wikidata London
London
WC postcode areaWCPostcode area WCPostcode area name London
London
WCPost towns 1Postcode districts 15Postcode sectors 46Postcodes (live) 3,005Postcodes (total) 7,279Statistics as at February 2012[1]The WC (Western Central) postcode area, also known as the London
London
WC postcode area,[2] is a group of postcode districts in central London, England. It includes parts of the London
London
Borough of Camden, City of Westminster, London
London
Borough of Islington and a very small part of the City of London. The area covered is of very high density development. The current postcode districts are relatively recent: WC1 and WC2 districts were established only in 1917
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Players' Theatre
The Players' Theatre was a London theatre which opened at 43 King Street, Covent Garden, on 18 October 1936. The club originally mounted period-style musical comedies, introducing Victorian-style music hall in December 1937
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Music Hall
Music hall
Music hall
is a type of British theatrical entertainment that was popular from the early Victorian era
Victorian era
circa 1850 and lasting until 1960. It involved a mixture of popular songs, comedy, speciality acts, and variety entertainment. The term is derived from a type of theatre or venue in which such entertainment took place. British music hall was similar to American vaudeville, featuring rousing songs and comic acts, while in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
the term "vaudeville"' referred to more working-class types of entertainment that would have been termed "burlesque" in America. Originating in saloon bars within public houses during the 1830s, music hall entertainment became increasingly popular with audiences, so much so, that during the 1850s, some public houses were demolished and specialised music hall theatres developed in their place
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The Royal Shakespeare Company
The Royal Shakespeare
Shakespeare
Company (RSC) is a major British theatre company, based in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England. The company employs over 1000 staff and produces around 20 productions a year. The RSC plays regularly in London, Newcastle upon Tyne and on tour across the UK and internationally. The company's home is in Stratford-upon-Avon, where it has recently redeveloped its Royal Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Swan theatres as part of a £112.8-million "Transformation" project. The theatres re-opened in November 2010, having closed in 2007. The new buildings attracted 18,000 visitors within the first week and received a positive media response both upon opening, and following the first full Shakespeare performances
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Frank Vosper
Frank Vosper (15 December 1899, in London
London
– 6 March 1937) was a British actor and playwright.[1][2]Contents1 Stage 2 Filmography 3 Death 4 References 5 External linksStage[edit] Vosper made his stage debut in 1919 and was best known for playing urbane villains.[3][4] His extensive stage experience included appearing in his own play Love from a Stranger (1936), adapted from the short story "Philomel Cottage" by Agatha Christie.[5][6] His screenplays included c
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The Rose Without A Thorn
Clifford Bax (13 July 1886 – 18 November 1962) was a versatile English writer, known particularly as a playwright, a journalist, critic and editor, and a poet, lyricist and hymn writer. He also was a translator (for example, of Goldoni). The composer Arnold Bax was his brother, and set some of his words to music.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Works 4 Notes 5 External linksLife[edit] He was born in Upper Tooting, south London (not Knightsbridge, as sometimes stated). Education was at the Slade and the Heatherley Art School.[2] He gave up painting to concentrate on writing. Independent wealth gave Bax time to write, and social connections. He had an apartment in Albany, the apartment complex in Piccadilly, London. He was a friend of Gustav Holst, whom he introduced to astrology,[3] the critic James Agate, and Arthur Ransome, among others
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Cathleen Nesbitt
Cathleen Nesbitt, CBE (24 November 1888 – 2 August 1982) was a British actress of stage, film and television.Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 Partial filmography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Cheshire, England to Thomas and Mary Catherine (née Parry) Nesbitt as Kathleen Mary Nesbitt in 1888 of Welsh and Irish descent, she was educated in Lisieux, France, and at the Queen's University of Belfast and the Sorbonne. Her younger brother, Thomas Nesbitt, Jr., acted in one film in 1925, before his death in South Africa in 1927 from an apparent heart attack. She made her debut in London in the stage revival of Arthur Wing Pinero's The Cabinet Minister (1910). She acted in countless plays after that. In 1911, she joined the Irish Players, went to the United States and debuted on Broadway in The Well of the Saints
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Lewis Gilbert
Lewis Gilbert CBE (6 March 1920 – 23 February 2018) was a British film director, producer and screenwriter, who directed more than 40 films during six decades; among them such varied titles as Reach for the Sky (1956), Sink the Bismarck!
Sink the Bismarck!
(1960), Alfie (1966), Educating Rita (1983) and Shirley Valentine
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Leontine Sagan
Leontine may refer to:As a given name Leontine "Lona" Cohen (1913–1992), American spy for the Soviet Union Leontine Cooper (1837–1903), Australian trade unionist, suffragist and campaigner for women's rights Leontine T. Kelly
Leontine T

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J B Priestley
John Boynton Priestley, OM (/ˈpriːstli/; 13 September 1894 – 14 August 1984), known by his pen name J.B. Priestley, was an English novelist, playwright, scriptwriter, social commentator and broadcaster. His Yorkshire background is reflected in much of his fiction, notably in The Good Companions (1929), which first brought him to wide public notice. Many of his plays are structured around a time slip, and he went on to develop a new theory of time, with different dimensions that link past, present, and future. In 1940, he broadcast a series of short propaganda radio shows that were credited with strengthening civilian morale during the Battle of Britain. His left-wing beliefs brought him into conflict with the government, and influenced the birth of the Welfare State
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Ralph Richardson
Sir Ralph David Richardson (19 December 1902 – 10 October 1983) was an English actor who, along with his contemporaries John Gielgud and Laurence Olivier, dominated the British stage of the mid-20th century. He worked in films throughout most of his career, and played more than sixty cinema roles. From an artistic but not theatrical background, Richardson had had no thought of a stage career until a production of Hamlet
Hamlet
in Brighton
Brighton
inspired him to become an actor. He learned his craft in the 1920s with a touring company and later the Birmingham Repertory Theatre. In 1931 he joined the Old Vic, playing mostly Shakespearean roles
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Emlyn Williams
George Emlyn Williams, CBE (26 November 1905 – 25 September 1987), known as Emlyn Williams, was a Welsh writer, dramatist and actor.Contents1 Early life 2 Professional career 3 Personal life 4 Honours 5 Death 6 Bibliography6.1 Plays7 Filmography7.1 Screenwriter 7.2 Director 7.3 Actor8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Williams was born into a Welsh-speaking, working class family at 1 Jones Terrace, Penyffordd, Ffynnongroyw, Flintshire. He spoke only Welsh until the age of eight and was barely literate. Later said he would probably have begun working in the mines at age 12 if he had not caught the attention of a London
London
social worker named Sarah Grace Cooke, the model for Miss Moffat in The Corn is Green. She established a school in Holywell
Holywell
Grammar School in 1915, and, recognising Williams's aptitude for languages, granted him a scholarship
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Murder In The Cathedral
Murder in the Cathedral is a verse drama by T.S. Eliot, first performed in 1935, that portrays the assassination of Archbishop Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral in 1170. Eliot drew heavily on the writing of Edward Grim, a clerk who was an eyewitness to the event.[1] The play, dealing with an individual's opposition to authority, was written at the time of rising fascism in Central Europe. Some material that the producer asked Eliot to remove or replace during the writing was transformed into the poem "Burnt Norton".[2]Contents1 Plot 2 Performances2.1 First performance 2.2 Television and film 2.3 Opera 2.4 Recordings3 Reception and criticism3.1 Eliot's own criticism4 Parodies 5 Further reading 6 NotesPlot[edit] The action occurs between 2 and 29 December 1170, chronicling the days leading up to the martyrdom of Thomas Becket following his absence of seven years in France. Becket's internal struggle is the main focus of the play. The book is divided into two parts
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