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Dub Music
Dub is a genre of music[1] that grew out of reggae in the 1960s, and is commonly considered a subgenre,[2] though it has developed to extend beyond the scope of reggae. Music in this genre consists predominantly of instrumental remixes of existing recordings[3] and is achieved by significantly manipulating and reshaping the recordings, usually by removing the vocals from an existing music piece, and emphasizing the drum and bass parts (this stripped-down track is sometimes referred to as a riddim). Other techniques include dynamically adding extensive echo, reverb, panoramic delay, and occasional dubbing of vocal or instrumental snippets from the original version or other works. It was an early form of popular electronic music.[4] Dub was pioneered by Osbourne "King Tubby" Ruddock, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Errol Thompson and others[2] in the late 1960s. Augustus Pablo is credited with bringing the melodica to dub, and is also among the pioneers and creators of the genre
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The Silvertones
The Silvertones (who also recorded as The Musketeers and The Muskyteers) were a Jamaican reggae harmony group formed in 1964, best known for their recordings for Lee "Scratch" Perry
Lee "Scratch" Perry
in the early 1970s. In 1964 three vocalists – Delroy Denton, Keith Coley, and Gilmore Grant – came together to form The Silvertones. In 1965 they had success with the singles "True Confession" and "It’s Real", both produced by Duke Reid and released on the Dr. Bird Label. The Silvertones also released "Cool Down" by Duke Reid. In 1968, The Silvertones released a cover version of Wilson Pickett’s song "In The Midnight Hour". Other singles included "Old Man River" and "Slow and Easy" on Reid’s Treasure Isle label. They recorded for Sonia Pottinger "Guns Fever" and by 1971 were recording releases such as "Tear Drops Will Fall" for Clancy Eccles
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Brass Instrument
A brass instrument is a musical instrument that produces sound by sympathetic vibration of air in a tubular resonator in sympathy with the vibration of the player's lips. Brass
Brass
instruments are also called labrosones, literally meaning "lip-vibrated instruments".[1] There are several factors involved in producing different pitches on a brass instrument. Slides, valves, crooks (though they are rarely used today), or keys are used to change vibratory length of tubing, thus changing the available harmonic series, while the player's embouchure, lip tension and air flow serve to select the specific harmonic produced from the available series. The view of most scholars (see organology) is that the term "brass instrument" should be defined by the way the sound is made, as above, and not by whether the instrument is actually made of brass
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Music Genre
A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music as belonging to a shared tradition or set of conventions.[1] It is to be distinguished from musical form and musical style, although in practice these terms are sometimes used interchangeably.[2][not in citation given] Recently, academics have argued that categorizing music by genre is inaccurate and outdated.[3] Music
Music
can be divided into different genres in many different ways. The artistic nature of music means that these classifications are often subjective and controversial, and some genres may overlap. There are even varying academic definitions of the term genre itself. In his book Form in Tonal Music, Douglass M. Green distinguishes between genre and form. He lists madrigal, motet, canzona, ricercar, and dance as examples of genres from the Renaissance period. To further clarify the meaning of genre, Green writes, "Beethoven's Op. 61 and Mendelssohn's Op
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Subgenre
Genre
Genre
(/ˈʒɒ̃rə, ˈʒɒn-, ˈdʒɒn-/; from French genre, meaning 'kind' or 'sort') is any form or type of communication in any mode (written, spoken, digital, artistic, etc.) with socially-agreed upon conventions developed over time. Genre
Genre
is most popularly known as a category of literature, music, or other forms of art or entertainment, whether written or spoken, audio or visual, based on some set of stylistic criteria, yet genres can be aesthetic, rhetorical, communicative, or functional. Genres form by conventions that change over time as cultures invent new genres and discontinue the use of old ones. Often, works fit into multiple genres by way of borrowing and recombining these conventions
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Big Beat
Big beat
Big beat
is an electronic music genre that usually uses heavy breakbeats and synthesizer-generated loops and patterns - common to acid house/techno
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Drum
The drum is a member of the percussion group of musical instruments. In the Hornbostel-Sachs classification system, it is a membranophone.[1] Drums consist of at least one membrane, called a drumhead or drum skin, that is stretched over a shell and struck, either directly with the player's hands, or with a drum stick, to produce sound. There is usually a resonance head on the underside of the drum, typically tuned to a slightly lower pitch than the top drumhead. Other techniques have been used to cause drums to make sound, such as the thumb roll. Drums are the world's oldest and most ubiquitous musical instruments, and the basic design has remained virtually unchanged for thousands of years.[1] Drums may be played individually, with the player using a single drum, and some drums such as the djembe are almost always played in this way. Others are normally played in a set of two or more, all played by the one player, such as bongo drums and timpani
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Delay (audio Effect)
Delay is an audio effect and an effects unit which records an input signal to an audio storage medium, and then plays it back after a period of time.[2] The delayed signal may either be played back multiple times, or played back into the recording again, to create the sound of a repeating, decaying echo. Delay effects range from a subtle echo effect to a pronounced blending of previous sounds with new sounds
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Reverberation
Reverberation, in psychoacoustics and acoustics, is a persistence of sound after the sound is produced.[1] A reverberation, or reverb, is created when a sound or signal is reflected causing a large number of reflections to build up and then decay as the sound is absorbed by the surfaces of objects in the space – which could include furniture, people, and air.[2] This is most noticeable when the sound source stops but the reflections continue, decreasing in amplitude, until they reach zero amplitude. Reverberation
Reverberation
is frequency dependent: the length of the decay, or reverberation time, receives special consideration in the architectural design of spaces which need to have specific reverberation times to achieve optimum performance for their intended activity.[3] In comparison to a distinct echo that is a minimum of 50 to 100 ms after the initial sound, reverberation is the occurrence of reflections that arrive in less than approximately 50 ms
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Synthesizer
A synthesizer (often abbreviated as synth, also spelled synthesiser) is an electronic musical instrument that generates electric signals that are converted to sound through instrument amplifiers and loudspeakers or headphones. Synthesizers may either imitate traditional musical instruments like piano, Hammond organ, flute, vocals; natural sounds like ocean waves, etc.; or generate novel electronic timbres. They are often played with a musical keyboard, but they can be controlled via a variety of other input devices, including music sequencers, instrument controllers, fingerboards, guitar synthesizers, wind controllers, and electronic drums. Synthesizers without built-in controllers are often called sound modules, and are controlled via USB, MIDI
MIDI
or CV/gate using a controller device, often a MIDI
MIDI
keyboard or other controller. Synthesizers use various methods to generate electronic signals (sounds)
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Electric Organ
An electric organ, also known as electronic organ, is an electronic keyboard instrument which was derived from the harmonium, pipe organ and theatre organ. Originally designed to imitate their sound, or orchestral sounds, it has since developed into several types of instruments:Hammond-style organs used in popular music genres and rock bands; digital church organs, which imitate pipe organs and are used primarily in churches; other types including combo organs, home organs, and software organs. Yamaha
Yamaha
GX-1, an early polyphonic synthesizer organ in the 1970sWERSI Scala, an open architecture software organ platform in 2002A custom three-manual Rodgers Trillium organ console installed in a church
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House Music
House music
House music
is a genre of electronic dance music created by club DJs and music producers in Chicago
Chicago
in the early 1980s.[15] Early house music was generally characterized by repetitive 4/4 beats, rhythms provided by drum machines,[15][failed verification] off-beat hi-hat cymbals, and synthesized basslines. While house displayed several characteristics similar to disco music, which preceded and influenced it, as both were DJ and record producer-created dance music, house was more electronic and minimalistic.[15] The mechanical, repetitive rhythm of house was one of its main components
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Guitar
The guitar is a fretted musical instrument that usually has six strings.[1] The sound is projected either acoustically, using a hollow wooden or plastic and wood box (for an acoustic guitar), or through electrical amplifier and a speaker (for an electric guitar). It is typically played by strumming or plucking the strings with the fingers, thumb or fingernails of the right hand or with a pick while fretting (or pressing against the frets) the strings with the fingers of the left hand. The guitar is a type of chordophone, traditionally constructed from wood and strung with either gut, nylon or steel strings and distinguished from other chordophones by its construction and tuning
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Drum Kit
A drum kit — also called a drum set, trap set, or simply drums — is a collection of drums and other percussion instruments, typically cymbals, which are set up on stands to be played by a single player,[1] with drumsticks held in both hands, and the feet operating pedals that control the hi-hat cymbal and the beater for the bass drum. A drum kit consists of a mix of drums (categorized classically as membranophones, Hornbostel-Sachs high-level classification 2) and idiophones - most significantly cymbals, but can also include the woodblock and cowbell (classified as Hornbostel-Sachs high-level classification 1).[2] In the 2000s, some kits also include electronic instruments ( Hornbostel-Sachs classification 53)
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Bass Guitar
The bass guitar[1] (also known as electric bass,[2][3][4] or bass) is a stringed instrument similar in appearance and construction to an electric guitar, but with a longer neck and scale length, and four to six strings or courses. The four-string bass is usually tuned the same as the double bass,[5] which corresponds to pitches one octave lower than the four lowest pitched strings of a guitar (E, A, D, and G).[6] The bass guitar is a transposing instrument, as it is notated in bass clef an octave higher than it sounds. It is played primarily with the fingers or thumb, by plucking, slapping, popping, strumming, tapping, thumping, or picking with a plectrum, often known as a pick
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Errol Thompson (audio Engineer)
Errol
Errol
may refer to:Contents1 People with the given name 2 Fictional characters 3 Places 4 See alsoPeople with the given name[edit] Errol Barnett (born 1983), anchor and correspondent for CNN International Errol Barrow
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