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Don't You (Forget About Me)
"Don't You (Forget About Me)" is a 1985 pop song performed by Scottish rock band Simple Minds. The song is best known for being played during the opening and closing credits of the John Hughes film The Breakfast Club
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Single (music)
In music, a single, record single or music single is a type of release, typically a song recording of fewer tracks than an LP record, an album or an EP record. This can be released for sale to the public in a variety of different formats. In most cases, a single is a song that is released separately from an album, although it usually also appears on an album. Typically, these are the songs from albums that are released separately for promotional uses such as digital download or commercial radio airplay and are expected to be the most popular. In other cases a recording released as a single may not appear on an album. As digital downloading and audio streaming have become more prevalent, it is often possible for every track on an album to also be available separately
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Jukebox
A jukebox is a partially automated music-playing device, usually a coin-operated machine, that will play a patron's selection from self-contained media. The classic jukebox has buttons with letters and numbers on them that, when entered in combination, are used to play a specific selection.Contents1 History 2 Notable models 3 Decline 4 Digital jukebox4.1 Jukebox
Jukebox
apps5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Coin-operated music boxes and player pianos were the first forms of automated coin-operated musical devices. These instruments used paper rolls, metal disks, or metal cylinders to play a musical selection on the instrument, or instruments, enclosed within the device. In the 1890s these devices were joined by machines which used actual recordings instead of physical instruments.[2][3] In 1890, Louis Glass and William S
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Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks
Mainstream Rock is a music chart in Billboard magazine which ranks the most-played songs on mainstream rock radio stations, a category that combines the formats of active rock and heritage rock.Contents1 History 2 Chart achievements2.1 Artists with the most number one songs 2.2 Artists with the most cumulative weeks at number one 2.3 Artists with the most top 10 songs 2.4 Artists with the most charted songs 2.5 Songs with the most weeks on the Mainstream Rock chart3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Rock Albums & Top Tracks charts were introduced in the March 21, 1981, issue of Billboard. The 50- and 60-position charts ranked airplay on album rock radio stations.[1] Because album-oriented rock stations focused on playing tracks from albums rather than specifically released singles, these charts were designed to measure the airplay of any and all tracks from an album
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12" Single
The 12-inch single
12-inch single
(often simply called 12″) is a type of gramophone record that has wider groove spacing and shorter playing time compared to typical LPs. This allows for louder levels to be cut on the disc by the cutting engineer, which in turn gives a wider dynamic range[citation needed], and thus better sound quality. This record type is commonly used in disco and dance music genres, where DJs use them to play in discos or clubs. They are played at either ​33 1⁄3 or 45 rpm.Contents1 Technical features 2 History2.1 Jamaican roots 2.2 In the United States 2.3 Later developments3 Maxi-singles 4 ReferencesTechnical features[edit] 12-inch singles typically have much shorter playing time than full-length LPs, thus require fewer grooves per inch
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Bridge (music)
In music, especially western popular music, a bridge is a contrasting section that prepares for the return of the original material section. In a piece in which the original material or melody is referred to as the "A" section, the bridge may be the third eight-bar phrase in a thirty-two-bar form (the B in AABA), or may be used more loosely in verse-chorus form, or, in a compound AABA form, used as a contrast to a full AABA section. The term comes from a German word for bridge, Steg, used by the Meistersingers of the 15th to the 18th century to describe a transitional section in medieval bar form.[2] The German term became widely known in 1920s Germany through musicologist Alfred Lorenz[3] and his exhaustive studies of Richard Wagner's adaptations of bar form in his popular 19th-century neo-medieval operas
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John Leland (journalist)
John Leland (born 1959) is an author and has been a New York Times journalist since 2000.[1][2][3] Leland began covering retirement and religion in January, 2004. During a stint in 1994, he was editor in chief of Details magazine.[2][4][5] Leland was also a senior editor at Newsweek, an editor and columnist at Spin magazine, and a reviewer for Trouser Press.[2][6][7] Leland wrote Hip: The History[8] and Why Kerouac Matters: The Lessons of On the Road (They're Not What You Think).[3][9][10][11]Contents1 Education 2 Personal 3 Awards 4 ReferencesEducation[edit] He earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from Columbia College in 1981.[1][2] Personal[edit] According to LeLand's Harper Collins biographical information, he lives in Manhattan's East Village with his wife, Risa, and son, Jordan.[12] Awards[edit] Leland has won two awards from the National Association of Black Journalists.[1] References[edit]^ a b c "John Leland". The New York Times
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Spin (magazine)
Spin is an American music magazine founded in 1985 by publisher Bob Guccione, Jr. The magazine stopped running in print in 2012 and currently runs as a webzine.[2]Contents1 History1.1 Later years2 Spin Alternative Record Guide 3 Contributors 4 Year-end lists4.1 Single of the Year 4.2 Album of the Year5 See also 6 References6.1 Footnotes 6.2 Bibliography7 External linksHistory[edit] Spin was established in 1985.[3] In its early years, the magazine was known for its broad music coverage with an emphasis on college rock, grunge, indie rock, and the ongoing emergence of hip-hop. The magazine was eclectic and bold, if sometimes haphazard. It pointedly provided a national alternative to Rolling Stone's more establishment-oriented style
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Daniel Kleinman
Daniel Kleinman (born 23 December 1955) is a British television commercial and music video director who has designed every title sequence for the James Bond series of films since GoldenEye (1995), with the exception of Quantum of Solace (2008) (which was designed by the filmmaking and design collective, MK12). He returned to design the titles for Skyfall (2012) and Spectre (2015).[1]Contents1 Career 2 James Bond 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] Kleinman formed Bazooka Joe a rock band with John Ellis and friends from Orange Hill Grammar School, Burnt Oak, London. Bazooka Joe played extensively throughout the 1970s
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Chandelier
A chandelier /ˌʃæn.dəlˈɪər/ (also known as girandole, candelabra lamp, or least commonly suspended lights) is a branched ornamental light fixture designed to be mounted on ceilings or walls.[1] Chandeliers are often ornate, and normally use incandescent light bulbs, though some modern designs also use fluorescent lamps and recently LEDs. Classic chandeliers have arrays of hanging crystal prisms to illuminate a room with refracted light, while contemporary chandeliers assume a more minimalist design that does not contain prisms and illuminate a room with direct light from the lamps, sometimes also equipped with translucent glass covering each lamp
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Rocking Horse
A rocking horse is a child's toy, usually shaped like a horse and mounted on rockers similar to a rocking chair. There are two sorts, the one where the horse part sits rigidly attached to a pair of curved rockers that are in contact with the ground, and a second sort, where the horse hangs on a rigid frame by iron straps the horse moves only relative to the frame, which does not move. Predecessors of the rocking horse may be seen in the rocking cradle, the tilting seats used during the Middle Ages for jousting practice as well as the wheeled hobby horse. The toy in its current form did not appear before the 17th century,[1] though some conflicting sources note medieval manuscripts including references to carved rocking horses, presumably of the toy kind.[2] From the 19th century onward, rocking horses became more commonly considered as child's toy
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Kent Music Report
The Kent Music Report
Kent Music Report
was a weekly record chart of Australian music singles and albums which was compiled by music enthusiast David Kent from May 1974 through to 1988
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Chrissie Hynde
Christine Ellen "Chrissie" Hynde (born September 7, 1951) is an American musician who is best known as a founding member of the rock band The Pretenders. Inspired by hippie counter-culture, Hynde worked in London
London
with Malcolm McLaren
Malcolm McLaren
and Vivienne Westwood
Vivienne Westwood
at their clothing store, SEX. In 1978, she formed her own band, Pretenders, with Pete Farndon, James Honeyman-Scott and Martin Chambers. As singer, songwriter and guitarist, she has been the only constant member of the band throughout its history. She has also released a number of songs with other musicians including Frank Sinatra, Cher
Cher
and UB40
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Ö3 Austria Top 40
Ö3 Austria
Austria
Top 40 is the official Austrian singles chart, as well as the radio show which presents it, aired Fridays on Hitradio Ö3. The show presents the Austrian singles, ringtones and downloads chart. It premiered on 26 November 1968 as Disc Parade and was presented by Ernst Grissemann
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Ultratop
Ultratop is an organization which generates and publishes the official record charts in Belgium, and it is also the name of most of those charts
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Top 30
The Top 30
Top 30
(also known previously as the BRT Top 30
Top 30
and today as both the Radio 2 Top 30
Top 30
and the VRT Top 30) is a Belgian weekly music record chart compiled by the Vlaamse Radio- en Televisieomroeporganisatie (VRT) network and broadcast every Saturday on its station Radio 2. It debuted on 2 May 1970, with "Spirit in the Sky" by Norman Greenbaum as its first number-one song.[1] It was the pre-eminent music industry standard chart for Flanders
Flanders
(the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium) until January 1995, when the Ultratop 50 was established
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