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Division I (NCAA)
NCAA DIVISION I (D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States
United States
. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition. This level was once called the University Division of the NCAA, in contrast to the lower level College Division; these terms were replaced with numeric divisions in 1973. The University Division was renamed Division I, while the College Division was split in two; the College Division members that offered scholarships or wanted to compete against those who did became Division II , while those who did not want to offer scholarships became Division III . For the 2014-15 school year, Division I contained 345 of the NCAA's 1,066 member institutions, with 125 in FBS, 125 in FCS, and 95 non-football schools, with six additional schools in transition from Division II to Division I. There was a moratorium on any additional movement up to D-I until 2012, after which any school that wants to move to D-I must be accepted for membership by a conference and show the NCAA it has the financial ability to support a D-I program
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National Collegiate Athletic Association
The NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION (NCAA) is a non-profit association which regulates athletes of 1,281 institutions, conferences, organizations, and individuals. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada
Canada
, and helps more than 450,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana . In 2014, the NCAA generated almost a billion dollars in revenue. 80 to 90% of this revenue was due to the Division I Men\'s Basketball
Basketball
Tournament . This revenue is then distributed back into various organizations and institutions across the United States. In August 1973, the current three-division setup of Division I , Division II , and Division III was adopted by the NCAA membership in a special convention. Under NCAA rules, Division I and Division II schools can offer scholarships to athletes for playing a sport. Division III schools may not offer any athletic scholarships. Generally, larger schools compete in Division I and smaller schools in II and III. Division I football was further divided into I-A and I-AA in 1978. Subsequently, the term "Division I-AAA" was briefly added to delineate Division I schools which do not field a football program at all, but that term is no longer officially used by the NCAA
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United States
Coordinates : 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America _ Flag Great Seal MOTTO: " In God We Trust " Other traditional mottos _ * " E pluribus unum " ( Latin
Latin
) (de facto) "Out of many, one" * " Annuit c
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Athletic Scholarship
An ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP is a form of scholarship to attend a college or university or a private high school awarded to an individual based predominantly on his or her ability to play in a sport . Athletic scholarships are common in the United States , but in many countries they are rare or non-existent. CONTENTS* 1 United States * 1.1 Overview * 1.1.1 Regulation and Organization * 1.2 Division I * 1.2.1 Origin of Athletic Scholarships in the U.S. * 1.2.2 NCAA Bylaws Governing Division I Athletic-Scholarships * 1.2.3 Future Directions * 2 Other countries * 2.1 Canada * 2.2 United Kingdom * 2.3 New Zealand * 3 Arguments for and against sports scholarships * 4 References * 5 External links UNITED STATESOVERVIEWRegulation And OrganizationIn the United States, athletic scholarships are largely regulated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). There are also JUCO\'s and NAIA, the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics . In 1973, the NCAA split its membership into three divisions: Division I , Division II , and Division III . Under NCAA rules, Division I and Division II schools can offer scholarships to athletes for playing a sport. Division III schools may not offer any athletic scholarships . Generally, larger schools compete in Division I and smaller schools in II and III. Most schools give offers to eligible students in most circumstances
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NCAA Division II
DIVISION II is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). It offers an alternative to both the larger and better-funded Division I and to the scholarship-free environment offered in Division III . Before 1973, the NCAA's smaller schools were grouped together in the COLLEGE DIVISION. In 1973, the College Division split in two when the NCAA began using numeric designations for its competitions. The College Division members who wanted to offer athletic scholarships or compete against those who did became Division II, while those who chose not to offer athletic scholarships became Division III. Nationally, ESPN televises the championship game in football , CBS televises the men's basketball championship, and ESPN2 televises the women's basketball championship. CBS Sports Network broadcasts six football games on Thursdays during the regular season, and one men's basketball game per week on Saturdays during that sport's regular season
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NCAA Division III
Sports DIVISION III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) of the United States. The division consists of colleges and universities that choose not to offer athletically related financial aid (athletic scholarships ) to their student-athletes. As explained in more detail in the article about NCAA Division II , the NCAA's first split was into two divisions. The former College Division formed because many NCAA member schools wanted an alternative to the expensive nature of what is now Division I . Division III formed in 1973, in a split of the College
College
Division. The former College Division members that chose to offer athletic scholarships or to remain in a division with those who did became Division II, while members that did not became Division III
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List Of NCAA Division I Ice Hockey Arenas
This is a list of arenas that currently serve as the home venue for NCAA DIVISION I COLLEGE ICE HOCKEY teams. Conference affiliations reflect those in the most recently completed 2015–16 NCAA DIVISION I MEN\'S ICE HOCKEY and 2015–16 NCAA DIVISION I WOMEN\'S ICE HOCKEY seasons. The arenas serve as home venues for both the men's and women's teams except where noted. In addition, venues which are not located on campus or are used infrequently during the season have been listed. CONTENTS * 1 Current arenas * 2 Additional arenas CURRENT ARENAS OFF-CAMPUS ARENA IMAGE ARENA CITY STATE TEAM CONFERENCE CAPACITY OPENED Cadet Ice Arena Colorado
Colorado
Springs CO Air Force Atlantic Hockey 2,502 1968 Olympia Ice Center West Springfield MA American International Atlantic Hockey 2,200 1998 Tate Rink West Point NY Army Atlantic Hockey 2,648 1985 John A
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College Football
COLLEGE FOOTBALL is American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies , or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States. No minor league farm organizations exist in American football. Therefore, college football is generally considered to be the second tier of American football in the United States; one step ahead of high school competition, and one step below professional competition. It is in college football where a player's performance directly impacts his chances of playing professional football. The best collegiate players will typically declare for the professional draft after 3 to 4 years of collegiate competition, with the NFL holding its annual draft every spring. 256 players are selected annually. Those not selected can still attempt to land an NFL roster spot as an undrafted free agent
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NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision
The NCAA DIVISION I FOOTBALL BOWL SUBDIVISION (FBS), formerly known as DIVISION I-A, is the top level of college football in the United States. The FBS is the most competitive subdivision of NCAA Division I , which itself consists of the largest and most competitive schools in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). As of the next college football season in 2017, there are 10 conferences and 130 schools in FBS. Despite the popularity of the professional National Football League , college football is very popular throughout much of the United States, and the top schools generate tens of millions of dollars in yearly revenue. Top FBS teams draw tens of thousands of fans to games, and the ten largest American stadiums by capacity all host FBS teams. College athletes are not paid, but colleges are allowed to provide players with non-monetary compensation such as athletic scholarships that provide for tuition, housing, and books
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NCAA Division I Football Championship
The NCAA DIVISION I FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP is an American college football tournament played each year to determine the champion of the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS). Prior to 2006, the game was known as the NCAA DIVISION I-AA FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP. The FCS is the highest division in college football to hold a playoff tournament sanctioned by the NCAA to determine its champion. The four-team playoff system used by the Bowl Subdivision is not sanctioned by the NCAA. The reigning national champions are the James Madison Dukes , who had previously won in 2004. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Champions * 3 Team titles * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links HISTORY Appalachian State's National Championship trophies showing the differences between 2005 (I-AA), 2006 (FCS), and 2007 (FCS). When Division I-AA was formed for football in 1978, the playoffs included just four teams, doubling to eight teams in its fourth season of 1981. In 1982 the I-AA playoffs were expanded to 12 teams, with each of the top four seeds receiving a first-round bye and a home game in the quarterfinals. In its ninth season of 1986, the I-AA playoffs were expanded again to a 16-team format, requiring four post-season victories to win the title. Eight conference champions received automatic bids, with the remaining eight bids available on an at-large basis
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Bowl Game
In North America, a BOWL GAME is one of a number of post-season college football games that are primarily played by teams belonging to the NCAA 's Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS). Prior to 2002 , bowl game statistics were not included in players' career totals and the games were mostly considered to be exhibition games involving a payout to participating teams. While teams once had to meet strict bowl eligibility requirements to receive an invitation to a bowl game, the number of bowl games has grown in recent years, climbing to 40 team-competitive games (not including the College Football Playoff National Championship ) starting in the 2015–16 bowl season , although this number will drop to 39 in the 2017–18 bowl season . The increase in bowl games has necessitated the steady easing of the NCAA bowl eligibility rules since 2006, as teams with a losing record are often required to fill some of the 78 available bowl slots. The term "bowl" originated from the Rose Bowl stadium , site of the first post-season college football games. The Rose Bowl Stadium, in turn, takes its name and bowl-shaped design from the Yale Bowl , the prototype of many football stadiums in the United States
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College Football Playoff
The COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYOFF (CFP) is an annual postseason tournament to determine the national champion of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest level of college football in the United States. The inaugural tournament was held during the 2014 NCAA Division I FBS football season . Four teams play in two semifinal games, and the winner of each semifinal advances to the College Football Playoff National Championship . The CFP is the first time the top-level NCAA football championship has been determined by a bracket competition . A 13-member committee selects and seeds the four teams to take part. This system differs from the use of polls or computer rankings that had previously been used to select the participants for the Bowl Championship Series (BCS), the title system used in FBS from 1998 to 2013. The new format is a Plus-One system , an idea which became popular as an alternative to the BCS after the 2003 and 2004 seasons ended in controversy. The two semifinal games rotate among six major bowl games, referred to as the NEW YEAR\'S SIX: the Rose Bowl , Sugar Bowl , Orange Bowl , Cotton Bowl , Fiesta Bowl , and Peach Bowl . The New Year's Six represent six of the ten oldest bowl games currently played at the FBS level
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BYU Cougars
The BYU COUGARS are the intercollegiate athletic teams that represent Brigham Young University
Brigham Young University
(BYU), a major university located in Provo, Utah
Utah
. BYU fields 21 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) varsity athletic teams. They are a member of the West Coast Conference for most sports. Other sports compete in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation and as independents. They were a member of the Mountain West Conference (MW) from its formation in 1999 until leaving in 2011 as part of a major NCAA
NCAA
conference realignment . Before the formation of the MW, the Cougars competed in the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference , the Mountain States Conference , and the Western Athletic Conference . All teams are named the "Cougars", a name that was first introduced by Eugene L. Roberts in the 1920s, initially only applied to the football team. In 1924, live cougar kittens named Cleo and Tarbo were brought to BYU and used as its mascots. In 1930, Tarbo died and Cleo was sent to the Hogle Zoo in Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
. By the 1950s all sports teams were known as the Cougars and it was decided that having a person in a costume was a better mascot form than live animals. In 1953, Cosmo the Cougar was created by Dwayne Stevenson
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List Of NCAA Division I FBS Football Programs
This is a list of the 128 schools in the DIVISION I FOOTBALL BOWL SUBDIVISION (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States
United States
. By definition, all schools in this grouping have varsity football teams. Schools in Division I FBS are distinguished from those in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) by being allowed to provide scholarship aid to a total of 85 players, and may grant a full scholarship to all 85. FCS schools are limited to financial assistance amounting to a maximum of 63 full scholarships, although some conferences voluntarily place further restrictions on athletic aid. The NCAA classifies FBS football as a "head-count" sport, meaning that each player receiving any athletically-related aid from the school counts fully against the 85-player limit. By contrast, FCS football is classified as an "equivalency" sport, which means that scholarship aid is limited to the equivalent of a specified number of full scholarships. In turn, this means that FCS schools can freely grant partial scholarships, but are also limited to a total of 85 players receiving assistance. Another NCAA rule mandates that any multi-sport athlete who plays football and receives any athletic aid is counted against the football limit, with an exception for players in non-scholarship FCS programs who receive aid in another sport
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List Of NCAA Division I FCS Football Programs
This is a list of schools in DIVISION I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) that play football in the United States as a varsity sport and are members of the FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP SUBDIVISION (FCS), known as DIVISION I-AA from 1978 through 2005. There will be 124 FCS programs for the 2017 season. Conference affiliations are current for the 2017 season. The teams in this subdivision compete in a 24-team playoff for the NCAA Division I Football Championship . All leagues allow scholarships with the exception of the Ivy League and Pioneer Football League
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College Basketball
The history of basketball is traced back to a YMCA
YMCA
International Training School, known today as Springfield College , located in Springfield, Massachusetts . The sport was created by a physical education teacher named James Naismith , who in the winter of 1891 was given the task of creating a game that would keep track athletes in shape and that would prevent them from getting hurt. The date of the first formal basketball game played at the Springfield YMCA
YMCA
Training School under Naismith's rules is generally given as December 21, 1891. Basketball
Basketball
began to be played at some college campuses by 1893. The first known college to field a basketball team against an outside opponent was Vanderbilt University , which played against the local YMCA
YMCA
in Nashville, Tennessee
Nashville, Tennessee
, on February 7, 1893. COLLEGE BASKETBALL today is governed by collegiate athletic bodies including the United States' National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), the United States Collegiate Athletic Association (USCAA), the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA), and the National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA)
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