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Divine Providence
In theology, divine providence, or just providence, is God's intervention in the universe. The term "Divine Providence" (usually capitalized) is also used as a title of God. A distinction is usually made between "general providence", which refers to God's continuous upholding the existence and natural order of the universe, and "special providence", which refers to God's extraordinary intervention in the life of people.[1] Miracles generally fall in the latter category.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Catholic theology 3 Reformed theology 4 Lutheran theology 5 Eastern Orthodox theology 6 Swedenborgian theology 7 In Jewish thought 8 LDS theology 9 Specific examples9.1 Text of Scripture10 See also 11 References 12 External links12.1 Christian material 12.2 Jewish materialEtymology[edit] The word comes from Latin providentia "foresight, prudence", from pro- "ahead" and videre "to see"
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Dominican Order
The Order of Preachers (Latin: Ordo Praedicatorum, postnominal abbreviation O.P.), also known as the Dominican Order, is a mendicant Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
founded by the Spanish priest Dominic of Caleruega in France, approved by Pope Honorius III
Pope Honorius III
via the Papal bull Religiosam vitam
Religiosam vitam
on 22 December 1216. Members of the order, who are referred to as Dominicans, generally carry the letters O.P. after their names, standing for Ordinis Praedicatorum, meaning of the Order of Preachers
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Universe
The Universe
Universe
is all of space and time[a] and their contents,[12] including planets, stars, galaxies, and all other forms of matter and energy
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Names Of God
A number of traditions have lists of many names of God, many of which enumerate the various qualities of a Supreme Being. The English word "God" (and its equivalent in other languages) is used by multiple religions as a noun or name to refer to different deities, or specifically to the Supreme Being, as denoted in English by the capitalized and uncapitalized terms "god" and "God".[1] Ancient cognate equivalents for the word "God" include proto-Semitic El, biblical Hebrew Elohim, Arabic
Arabic
'ilah, and biblical Aramaic Elah. The personal or proper name for God
God
in many of these languages may either be distinguished from such attributes, or homonymic. For example, in Judaism
Judaism
the tetragrammaton is sometimes related to the ancient Hebrew ehyeh (I will be)
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Prudence
Prudence
Prudence
(Latin: prudentia, contracted from providentia meaning "seeing ahead, sagacity") is the ability to govern and discipline oneself by the use of reason.[1] It is classically considered to be a virtue, and in particular one of the four Cardinal virtues
Cardinal virtues
(which are, with the three theological virtues, part of the seven virtues). Prudentia
Prudentia
is an allegorical female personification of the virtue, whose attributes are a mirror and snake, who is frequently depicted as a pair with Justitia, the Roman goddess of Justice. The word derives from the 14th-century Old French
Old French
word prudence, which, in turn, derives from the Latin prudentia meaning "foresight, sagacity"
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Augustine Of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
(/ɔːˈɡʌstɪn/; 13 November 354 – 28 August 430)[1] was an early Christian theologian
Christian theologian
and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity
Western Christianity
and Western philosophy. He was the bishop of Hippo Regius
Hippo Regius
in north Africa and is viewed as one of the most important Church Fathers
Church Fathers
in Western Christianity
Christianity
for his writings in the Patristic Era. Among his most important works are The City of God, On Christian Doctrine
On Christian Doctrine
and Confessions. According to his contemporary Jerome, Augustine "established anew the ancient Faith".[note 1] In his youth he was drawn to Manichaeism, later to neo-Platonism
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High Middle Ages
Central Europe Guelf, Hohenstaufen, and Ascanian
Ascanian
domains in Germany about 1176         Duchy of Saxony          Margravate of Brandenburg          Duchy of Franconia         Duchy of Swabia          Duchy of BavariaThe High Middle Ages
Middle Ages
or High Medieval Period was the period of European history lasting from AD 1000 to 1250
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Thomas Aquinas
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalv t ePart of a series onChristianityJesus Christ Jesus
Jesus
in Christianity Son of God Virgin birth Ministry Crucifixion ResurrectionBible FoundationsOld Testament New Testament Gospel Canon Books Church Creed New CovenantTheologyGod TrinityFather Son Holy SpiritApologetics Baptism Christology History of theology Mission Patriology Pneumatology SalvationHistory TraditionMary Apostles Peter Paul Fathers Early Christianity Constantine Councils Augustine East–West Schism Crusades Aquinas Luther Reformation Radical Reformation<
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Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange
Réginald Marie Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P. (French: [gaʁigu lagrɑ̃ʒ]; February 21, 1877 – February 15, 1964) was a French Catholic theologian. He has been noted as a leading neo-Thomist of the 20th century, along with Jacobus Ramírez, Édouard Hugon, and Martin Grabmann.[1] He taught at the Dominican Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas, the Angelicum, in Rome
Rome
from 1909 to 1960. Here he wrote his magnum opus, The Three Ages of the Interior Life (Les Trois Ages de la Vie Interieure) in 1938. In 1918 Garrigou initiated courses in sacred art, mysticism, and aesthetics at the Angelicum[2] influencing future liturgical artists such as Marie Alain Couturier, who studied theology there from 1930 to 1932.[3]Contents1 Life 2 Thought 3 Influence 4 Works 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksLife[edit] He was born Gontran-Marie Garrigou Lagrange on February 21, 1877, in Auch, near Toulouse, France
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Trinity
The Christian doctrine of the Trinity
Trinity
(Latin: Trinitas, lit. 'triad', from trinus, "threefold")[2] holds that God
God
is three consubstantial persons[3] or hypostases[4]—the Father, the Son ( Jesus
Jesus
Christ), and the Holy Spirit—as "one God
God
in three Divine Persons"
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John Calvin
John Calvin
John Calvin
(/ˈkælvɪn/;[1] French: Jean Calvin, pronounced [ʒɑ̃ kalvɛ̃]; born Jehan Cauvin: 10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was a French theologian, pastor and reformer in Geneva
Geneva
during the Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism, aspects of which include the doctrines of predestination and of the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation, in which doctrines Calvin was influenced by and elaborated upon the Augustinian and other Christian traditions
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Total Depravity
Total depravity
Total depravity
(also called radical corruption or pervasive depravity) is a Christian theological doctrine derived from the Augustinian concept of original sin
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Free Will
Free will
Free will
is the ability to choose between different possible courses of action unimpeded.[1][2] Free will
Free will
is closely linked to the concepts of responsibility, praise, guilt, sin, and other judgements which apply only to actions that are freely chosen. It is also connected with the concepts of advice, persuasion, deliberation, and prohibition. Traditionally, only actions that are freely willed are seen as deserving credit or blame. There are numerous different concerns about threats to the possibility of free will, varying by how exactly it is conceived, which is a matter of some debate. Some conceive free will to be the capacity to make choices in which the outcome has not been determined by past events. Determinism suggests that only one course of events is possible, which is inconsistent with the existence of free will thus conceived
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Predestination
Predestination, in theology, is the doctrine that all events have been willed by God, usually with reference to the eventual fate of the individual soul.[1] Explanations of predestination often seek to address the "paradox of free will", whereby God's omniscience seems incompatible with human free will
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Protestant
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It or
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