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Divination
Divination
Divination
(from Latin divinare "to foresee, to be inspired by a god",[2] related to divinus, divine) is the attempt to gain insight into a question or situation by way of an occultic, standardized process or ritual.[3] Used in various forms throughout history, diviners ascertain their interpretations of how a querent should proceed by reading signs, events, or omens, or through alleged contact with a supernatural agency.[4] Divination
Divination
can be seen as a systematic method with which to organize what appear to be disjointed, random facets of existence such that they provide insight into a problem at hand. If a distinction is to be made between divination and fortune-telling, divination has a more formal or ritualistic element and often contains a more social character, usually in a religious context, as seen in traditional African medicine
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Divinization
Apotheosis
Apotheosis
(from Greek ἀποθέωσις from ἀποθεοῦν, apotheoun "to deify"; in Latin
Latin
deificatio "making divine"; also called divinization and deification) is the glorification of a subject to divine level. The term has meanings in theology, where it refers to a belief, and in art, where it refers to a genre. In theology, apotheosis refers to the idea that an individual has been raised to godlike stature
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Henotheism
Henotheism (from Greek ἑνός θεός (henos theos), meaning 'one god') is the worship of a single god while not denying the existence or possible existence of other deities.[1][2] Friedrich Schelling (1775–1854) coined the word, and Friedrich Welcker
Friedrich Welcker
(1784–1868) used it to depict primitive monotheism among ancient Greeks.[3]
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Akbar S. Ahmed
Akbar Salahuddin Ahmed, (born. January 15, 1943) also known as Akbar Ahmed, is an American-Pakistani academic, author, poet, playwright, filmmaker and former diplomat.[2][3] He currently holds the Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies and is Professor of International Relations at the American University
American University
in Washington, D.C.[2][4][3] A former Pakistani High Commissioner to the UK and Ireland, Ahmed was a member of the Civil Service of Pakistan
Civil Service of Pakistan
and served as Political Agent in South Waziristan Agency
South Waziristan Agency
and Commissioner in Baluchistan.[5][6][2] He also served as the Iqbal Fellow (Chair of Pakistan
Pakistan
Studies) at the University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge
as well as holding teaching positions at Harvard, Princeton, and the U.S
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Augustin Calmet
Abbot
Abbot
and exegete Historian; Scholar; Theologian; Philosopher, Occultist; TranslatorAntoine Augustin Calmet, O.S.B. (26 February 1672 – 25 October 1757), a French Benedictine
Benedictine
monk, was born at Ménil-la-Horgne, then in the Duchy of Bar, part of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
(now the French department of Meuse, located in the region of Lorraine). Calmet was a pious monk as well as a learned man, and one of the most distinguished members of the Congregation of St. Vanne. In recognition of these qualities he was elected prior of Lay-Saint-Christophe
Lay-Saint-Christophe
in 1715, Abbot
Abbot
of St-Léopold at Nancy in 1718, and of Senones Abbey
Senones Abbey
in 1729. He was twice entrusted with the office of Abbot
Abbot
General of the congregation
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Archaeology Of Religion And Ritual
The archaeology of religion and ritual is a growing field of study within archaeology that applies ideas from religious studies, theory and methods, anthropological theory, and archaeological and historical methods and theories to the study of religion and ritual in past human societies from a material perspective.Contents1 Definitions 2 Theory2.1 Anthropology of religion 2.2 Religion, identity, and practice 2.3 Religion, power, and inequality 2.4 Historical method and theory3 Material correlates 4 Examples of research by area4.1 Africa 4.2 Americas 4.3 Asia 4.4 Europe 4.5 Australia/South Pacific5 See also5.1 Modern religious use of archaeological sites 5.2 Biblical archaeology6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDefinitions[edit]
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The Elementary Forms Of The Religious Life
The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (French: Les formes élémentaires de la vie religieuse), published by the French sociologist Émile Durkheim
Émile Durkheim
in 1912, is a book that analyzes religion as a social phenomenon. Durkheim attributes the development of religion to the emotional security attained through communal living. His study of totemic societies in Australia led to a conclusion that the animal or plant that each clan worshipped as a sacred power was in fact that society itself.[1]:201 Halfway through the text, Durkheim inquisites that, "So if [the totem animal] is at once the symbol of the god and of the society, is that not because the god and the society are only one."[1]:206 According to Durkheim, early humans associated such feelings not only with one another, but as well with objects in their environment
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Ghost Dance
The Ghost
Ghost
Dance (Caddo: Nanissáanah,[1] also called the Ghost
Ghost
Dance of 1890) was a new religious movement incorporated into numerous American Indian belief systems. According to the teachings of the Northern Paiute
Northern Paiute
spiritual leader Wovoka
Wovoka
(renamed Jack Wilson), proper practice of the dance would reunite the living with spirits of the dead, bring the spirits of the dead to fight on their behalf, make the white colonists leave, and bring peace, prosperity, and unity to Native American peoples throughout the region.[2] The basis for the Ghost
Ghost
Dance, the circle dance, is a traditional form that has been used by many Native American peoples since prehistoric times, but this new ceremony was first practiced among the Nevada Paiute in 1889
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Enchanted Feminism
Enchanted Feminism: The Reclaiming Witches of San Francisco
San Francisco
is an anthropological study of the Reclaiming Wiccan community of San Francisco
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Coral Gardens And Their Magic
Coral Gardens and Their Magic, properly Coral Gardens and Their Magic: A Study of the Methods of Tilling the Soil and of Agricultural Rites in the Trobriand Islands, is the final book in anthropologist Bronisław Malinowski's ethnographic trilogy on the lives of the Trobriand Islanders. It concentrates on the cultivation practices the Trobriand Islanders
Trobriand Islanders
used to grow yams, taro, bananas and palms.[1] It describes the gardens in which the Trobrianders grew food as more than merely utilitarian spaces, even as works of art.[2] In 1988 Alfred Gell called the book "still the best account of any primitive technological-cum-magical system, and unlikely ever to be superseded in this respect".[3] The book has been described as Malinowski's magnum opus.[4]Contents1 Overview 2 Reception 3 Release details 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit] The book consists of seven parts divided over two volumes
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Sacred–profane Dichotomy
The sacred–profane dichotomy is an idea posited by French sociologist Émile Durkheim, who considered it to be the central characteristic of religion: "religion is a unified system of beliefs and practices relative to sacred things, that is to say, things set apart and forbidden."[1] In Durkheim's theory, the sacred represented the interests of the group, especially unity, which were embodied in sacred group symbols, or totems. The profane, on the other hand, involved mundane individual concerns. Durkheim explicitly stated that the sacred–profane dichotomy was not equivalent to good/evil
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Transtheism
Transtheism is a term coined by either philosopher Paul Tillich
Paul Tillich
or Indologist Heinrich Zimmer[1] referring to a system of thought or religious philosophy which is neither theistic, nor atheistic, but is beyond them. Zimmer applies the term to the theological system of Jainism, which is theistic in the limited sense that the gods exist, but become irrelevant as they are transcended by moksha (that is, a system which is not non-theistic, but in which the gods are not the highest spiritual instance)
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Polytheism
Polytheism
Polytheism
(from Greek πολυθεϊσμός, polytheismos) is the worship of or belief in multiple deities, which are usually assembled into a pantheon of gods and goddesses, along with their own religions and rituals. In most religions which accept polytheism, the different gods and goddesses are representations of forces of nature or ancestral principles, and can be viewed either as autonomous or as aspects or emanations of a creator deity or transcendental absolute principle (monistic theologies), which manifests immanently in nature (panentheistic and pantheistic theologies).[1] Most of the polytheistic deities of ancient religions, with the notable exceptions of the Ancient Egyptian[2] and Hindu deities, were conceived as having physical bodies. Polytheism
Polytheism
is a type of theism
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Monotheism
Monotheism
Monotheism
has been defined as the belief in the existence of only one god that created the world, is all-powerful and intervenes in the world.[1][2][3] A broader definition of monotheism is the belief in one god.[4][5][6][7] A distinction may be made between exclusive monotheism, and both inclusive monotheism and pluriform (panentheistic) monotheism which, while recognising various distinct gods, postulate some underlying unity.[8] Monothe
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Joseph Campbell
Joseph John Campbell (March 26, 1904 – October 30, 1987) was an American mythologist who worked in comparative mythology and comparative religion. His work covers many aspects of the human experience. Campbell's magnum opus is his book The Hero
Hero
with a Thousand Faces (1949), in which he discusses his theory of the journey of the archetypal hero found in world mythologies. Since the book's publication, Campbell's theory has been consciously applied by a wide variety of modern writers and artists
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Rhumsiki
Rhumsiki, also spelt Rumsiki and Roumsiki, is a village in the Far North Province of Cameroon. Rhumsiki is located in the Mandara Mountains 55 km (34 mi) from Mokolo and 3 km (2 mi) from the border with Nigeria.[1] The village is similar to many others in northern Cameroon. The inhabitants, members of the Kapsiki ethnic group, live in small houses built from local stone and topped with thatched roofs;[2] these homes are scattered throughout the village and surrounding valley. Nevertheless, Rhumsiki is one of Cameroon's most popular tourist attractions and "the most touristic place in northern Cameroon".[3] The attraction is the surrounding scenery
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