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Districts Of Germany
In most German states, the primary administrative subdivision is a Landkreis ("rural district"); the exceptions are the states of North Rhine-Westphalia and Schleswig-Holstein, where the term is simply Kreis.[1] Most major cities in Germany
Germany
are not part of any Kreis, and perform, themselves, functions like those of Kreisen; such a city is referred to as a Kreisfreie Stadt (literally "district-free city") or Stadtkreis ("urban district"). Kreise stand at an intermediate level of administration between each German state (s. Land, p. Länder) and the municipal governments (s. Gemeinde, p. Gemeinden) within it.[2] These correspond to level-3 administrative units in the Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS 3), and are roughly equivalent to counties in the United States. Previously, the similar title Reichskreis (Imperial Circle) was given to groups of states in the Holy Roman Empire
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Federal Labour Court
The Federal Labour Court
Federal Labour Court
(Bundesarbeitsgericht) is the court of the last resort for cases of labour law in Germany, both for individual labour law (mostly concerning contracts of employment) and collective labour law (e.g
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "H
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Federal Social Court
The Federal Social Court
Federal Social Court
(Bundessozialgericht) is the German federal court of appeals for social security cases, mainly cases concerning the public health insurance, long-term care insurance, pension insurance and occupational accident insurance schemes. Trial courts for these cases are the Sozialgerichte (Social Courts)
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Electoral System Of Germany
The German Federal Election
Election
System regulates the election of the members of the national parliament, called Bundestag. According to the principles governing the elections laws, set down in Art. 38 of German Basic Law, elections are to be universal, direct, free, equal, and secret. Furthermore, the German Basic Law stipulates that Bundestag elections are to take place every four years and that one can vote, and be elected, upon reaching the age of 18. All other stipulations for the federal elections are regulated by the Federal Electoral Act. Elections always take place on a Sunday. Mail votes are possible upon application. Germans elect their members of parliament with two votes. One vote is for a direct candidate, who ought to receive a plurality vote in their election district. The second vote (considered as more important) is to elect a party list in each state as established by its respective party caucus
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Fourth Merkel Cabinet
The fourth cabinet of Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel
Angela Merkel
is the current government of Germany, sworn in on 14 March 2018 after Merkel was proposed as Chancellor by President of Germany
President of Germany
Frank-Walter Steinmeier and elected on the first ballot. It is the 24th cabinet of Germany.[1] This government is supported by a coalition of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), the Christian Social Union of Bavaria
Christian Social Union of Bavaria
(CSU), and the Social Democrats (SPD),[2] as was its immediate predecessor. Composition[edit] The cabinet consists of Chancellor Angela Merkel
Angela Merkel
and fifteen Federal Ministers. Fourteen ministers head a department, one member of the cabinet, the Chief of Staff of the Chancellery, will be a Federal Minister for Special
Special
Affairs without a portfolio
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Olaf Scholz
Olaf Scholz
Olaf Scholz
(German pronunciation: [ˈoːlaf ˈʃɔlts]; born (1958-06-14)14 June 1958) is a German politician serving as Federal Minister of Finance since 14 March 2018 and as Acting Chairman of the Social Democratic Party (SPD) since 13 February 2018. He was First Mayor of Hamburg
Hamburg
from 7 March 2011 to 13 March 2018. A member of the Bundestag
Bundestag
from 1998 to 2001 and again from 2002 to 2011, Scholz was Minister of the Interior of Hamburg
Hamburg
under First Mayor Ortwin Runde
Ortwin Runde
from May to October 2001
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Federal Administrative Court (Germany)
The Federal Administrative Court (Bundesverwaltungsgericht) is one of the five federal supreme courts of Germany. It is the court of the last resort for generally all cases of administrative law, mainly disputes between citizens and the state
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Frank-Walter Steinmeier
Frank-Walter Steinmeier
Frank-Walter Steinmeier
(German: [ˈfʁaŋkˌvaltɐ ˈʃtaɪ̯nˌmaɪ̯.ɐ]; born 5 January 1956) is a German politician serving as President of Germany
President of Germany
since 19 March 2017.[1] He previously was Minister for Foreign Affairs
Foreign Affairs
from 2005 to 2009 and again from 2013 to 2017, and as Vice-Chancellor of Germany
Vice-Chancellor of Germany
from 2007 to 2009. He was chairman-in-office of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) in 2016. Steinmeier is a member of the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), holds a doctorate in law and was formerly a career civil servant
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Imperial Circle
During the Early Modern period
Early Modern period
the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
was divided into Imperial Circles (Latin: Circuli imperii, German: Reichskreise; singular Circulus imperii, Reichskreis), administrative groupings whose primary purposes were the organization of common defensive structure and the collection of imperial taxes. They were also used as a means of organization within the Imperial Diet and the Imperial Chamber Court. Each circle had a Circle Diet, although not every member of the Circle Diet would hold membership of the Imperial Diet as well. Six Imperial Circles were introduced at the Diet of Augsburg
Diet of Augsburg
in 1500. In 1512, three more circles were added, and the large Saxon Circle
Saxon Circle
was split into two, so that from 1512 until the collapse of the Holy Roman Empire in the Napoleonic era, there were ten Imperial Circles
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Holy Roman Empire
The Holy Roman Empire
Roman Empire
(Latin: Sacrum Romanum Imperium; German: Heiliges Römisches Reich) was a multi-ethnic complex of territories in central Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and continued until its dissolution in 1806.[6] The largest territory of the empire after 962 was the Kingdom of Germany, though it also came to include the Kingdom of Bohemia, the Kingdom of Burgundy, the Kingdom of Italy, and numerous other territories.[7][8][9] On 25 December 800, Pope Leo III crowned the Frankish king Charlemagne as Emperor, reviving the title in Western Europe, more than three centuries after the fall of the Western Roman Empire
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County
A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposes,[1] in certain modern nations. The term is derived from the Old French
Old French
conté or cunté denoting a jurisdiction under the sovereignty of a count (earl) or a viscount.[2] The modern French is comté, and its equivalents in other languages are contea, contado, comtat, condado, Grafschaft, graafschap, Gau, etc. (cf
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Federal Fiscal Court
The Federal Fiscal Court
Federal Fiscal Court
(Bundesfinanzhof) is one of five federal supreme courts of Germany, established according to Article 95 of the Basic Law. It is the federal court of appeal for tax and customs matters in cases which have already been heard by the subordinate instance, namely the Finance Courts. The Federal Fiscal Court
Federal Fiscal Court
was established in 1950 (succeeding the supreme Finance Court of the German Reich - Reichsfinanzhof - established in 1918)
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North Rhine-Westphalia
North Rhine- Westphalia
Westphalia
(German: Nordrhein-Westfalen, pronounced [ˈnɔʁtʁaɪ̯n vɛstˈfaːlən] ( listen), commonly shortened to NRW) is the most populous state of Germany, with a population of approximately 18 million, and the fourth largest by area. Its capital is Düsseldorf; the largest city is Cologne. Four of Germany's ten largest cities (Cologne, Düsseldorf, Dortmund, and Essen) are located in this state, as well as the second largest metropolitan area on the European continent, Rhine-Ruhr. North Rhine- Westphalia
Westphalia
was founded in 1946 as a merger of the provinces of North Rhine
North Rhine
and Westphalia, both formerly parts of Prussia, and the Free State of Lippe
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Neuss
Neuss
Neuss
(German pronunciation: [ˈnɔʏs] ( listen); spelled Neuß until 1968; Limburgish: Nüss; Latin: Novaesium) is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is located on the west bank of the Rhine
Rhine
opposing Düsseldorf. Neuss
Neuss
is the largest city within the Rhein-Kreis Neuss
Rhein-Kreis Neuss
district
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Referendums In Germany
Referendums in Germany
Germany
are an element of direct democracy. On the federal level only two types of a mandatory binding referendum exist – in changing the constitution and in changing the state territories. All states have an enacted laws for popular indirect initiatives allowing to collect signatures for a request to the government. The government may issue a poll on any topic whereas the outcome is usually non-binding
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