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Districts Of England
The districts of England
England
(also known as local authority districts or local government districts to distinguish from unofficial city districts) are a level of subnational division of England
England
used for the purposes of local government.[1] As the structure of local government in England
England
is not uniform, there are currently four principal types of district-level subdivision. There are a total of 326 districts made up of 36 metropolitan boroughs, 32 London boroughs, 201 non-metropolitan districts, 55 unitary authorities, as well as the City of London
City of London
and the Isles of Scilly
Isles of Scilly
which are also districts, but do not correspond to any of these categories. Some districts are styled as boroughs, cities, or royal boroughs; these are purely honorific titles, and do not alter the status of the district
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Unitary Authorities In England
Unitary authorities of England are local authorities that are responsible for the provision of all local government services within a district. They are constituted under the Local Government Act 1992, which amended the Local Government Act 1972 to allow the existence of counties that do not have multiple districts. They typically allow large towns to have separate local authorities from the less urbanised parts of their counties and provide a single authority for small counties where division into districts would be impractical. Unitary authorities do not cover all of England. Most were established during the 1990s and a further tranche were created in 2009
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Sanitary District
Sanitary districts were established in England and Wales
England and Wales
in 1875 and in Ireland
Ireland
in 1878. The districts were of two types, based on existing structures:Urban sanitary districts in towns with existing local government bodies Rural sanitary districts in the remaining rural areas of poor law unions.Each district was governed by a sanitary authority and was responsible for various public health matters such as providing clean drinking water, sewers, street cleaning, and clearing slum housing. In England and Wales, both rural and urban sanitary districts were replaced in 1894 by the Local Government Act 1894
Local Government Act 1894
by the more general rural districts and urban districts
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Local Government Act 1894
The Local Government Act 1894
Local Government Act 1894
(56 & 57 Vict. c. 73) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United Kingdom
that reformed local government in England and Wales outside the County of London. The Act followed the reforms carried out at county level under the Local Government Act 1888. The 1894 legislation introduced elected councils at district and parish level. The principal effects of the act were:The creation a system of urban and rural districts with elected councils
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Urban District (Great Britain And Ireland)
A district is a type of administrative division that, in some countries, is managed by local government
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Rural District
Rural
Rural
districts were a type of local government area – now superseded – established at the end of the 19th century in England, Wales, and Ireland
Ireland
for the administration of predominantly rural areas at a level lower than that of the administrative counties.Contents1 England
England
and Wales 2 Ireland 3 References England
England
and Wales[edit] In England and Wales
England and Wales
they were created in 1894 (by the Local Government Act 1894) along with urban districts. They replaced the earlier system of sanitary districts (themselves based on poor law unions, but not replacing them). Rural
Rural
districts had elected rural district councils (RDCs), which inherited the functions of the earlier sanitary districts, but also had wider authority over matters such as local planning, council housing, and playgrounds and cemeteries
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Administrative County
An administrative county was an administrative division in England and Wales and Ireland
Ireland
from 1888 to 1974, used for the purposes of local government
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County Of London
The County of London
County of London
was a county of England from 1889 to 1965, corresponding to the area known today as Inner London. It was created as part of the general introduction of elected county government in England, by way of the Local Government Act 1888. The Act created an administrative County of London, which included within its territory the City of London. However, the City of London
City of London
and the County of London formed separate ceremonial counties for "non-administrative" purposes.[1] The local authority for the county was the London County Council (LCC), which initially performed only a limited range of functions, but gained further powers during its 76-year existence. The LCC provided very few services within the City of London, where the ancient Corporation monopolised local governance.[1] In 1900 the lower-tier civil parishes and district boards were replaced with 28 new metropolitan boroughs
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Civil Parish
In England, a civil parish is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. It is an administrative parish, in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish. A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch. Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council. Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish
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Shire Counties
A non-metropolitan county, or colloquially, shire county, is a county-level entity in England that is not a metropolitan county. The counties typically have populations of 300,000 to 1.4 million.[1] The term shire county is, however, an unofficial usage. Many of the non-metropolitan counties bear historic names and most end in the suffix "-shire" such as Wiltshire or Staffordshire. Of the remainder, some counties had the -shire ending and have lost it over time; such as Devon and Somerset
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Greater London Council
The Greater London
Greater London
Council (GLC) was the top-tier local government administrative body for Greater London
Greater London
from 1965 to 1986. It replaced the earlier London County Council
London County Council
(LCC) which had covered a much smaller area. The GLC was dissolved in 1986 by the Local Government Act 1985 and its powers were devolved to the London
London
boroughs and other entities
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Greater London Authority
The Greater London
Greater London
Authority (GLA) is a top-tier administrative body for Greater London, England. It consists of a directly elected executive Mayor of London, currently Sadiq Khan, and an elected 25-member London Assembly
London Assembly
with scrutiny powers. The authority was established in 2000, following a local referendum, and derives most of its powers from the Greater London
Greater London
Authority Act 1999 and the Greater London
London
Authority Act 2007. It is a strategic regional authority, with powers over transport, policing, economic development, and fire and emergency planning. Three functional bodies — Transport for London, the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime, and the London
London
Fire Commissioner — are responsible for delivery of services in these areas
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Metropolitan County
The metropolitan counties are a type of county-level administrative division of England. There are six metropolitan counties, which each cover large urban areas, typically with populations of 1.2 to 2.8 million.[1] They were created in 1974 and are each divided into several metropolitan districts or boroughs. The metropolitan county councils were abolished in 1986 with most of their functions being devolved to the individual boroughs, making them de facto unitary authorities. The remaining functions were taken over by joint boards.[2] The metropolitan counties have population densities of between 800 (South Yorkshire) and 2,800 (West Midlands) people/km²
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English Poor Laws
The English Poor Laws[2] were a system of poor relief which existed in England and Wales[3] that developed out of late-medieval and Tudor-era laws being codified in 1587–98. The Poor Law system was in existence until the emergence of the modern welfare state after the Second World War.[1] English Poor Law legislation can be traced back as far as 1536,[4] when legislation was passed to deal with the impotent poor, although there is much earlier Tudor legislation dealing with the problems caused by vagrants and beggars.[2] The history of the Poor Law in England and Wales is usually divided between two statutes, the Old Poor Law passed during the reign of Elizabeth I[5] and the New Poor Law, passed in 1834, which significantly modified the existing system of poor relief
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County Council
A county council is the elected administrative body governing an area known as a county. This term has slightly different meanings in different countries.Contents1 Ireland1.1 History1.1.1 1899–1922 1.1.2 1922 to present2 Taiwan2.1 Taiwan Province 2.2 Fujian Province3 United Kingdom3.1 England3.1.1 History 3.1.2 2009 reforms3.2 Northern Ireland 3.3 Scotland3.3.1 History3.4 Wales3.4.1 History4 United States 5 Other countries 6 ReferencesIreland[edit] The county councils created under British rule in 1899 continue to exist in Ireland, although they are now governed under legislation passed by Oireachtas Éireann, principally the Local Government Act 2001. History[edit] 1899–1922[edit] The Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898
Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898
introduced county councils to Ireland
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