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Discobolus
The Discobolus
Discobolus
of Myron
Myron
("discus thrower", Greek: Δισκοβόλος, Diskobólos) is a Greek sculpture that was completed toward the end of the Severe period, circa 460–450 BC. The original Greek bronze is lost but the work is known through numerous Roman copies, both full-scale ones in marble, which was cheaper than bronze,[1] such as the first to be recovered, the Palombara Discobolus, and smaller scaled versions in bronze. A discus thrower is depicted about to release his throw: "by sheer intelligence", Kenneth Clark
Kenneth Clark
observed in The Nude, " Myron
Myron
has created the enduring pattern of athletic energy. He has taken a moment of action so transitory that students of athletics still debate if it is feasible, and he has given it the completeness of a cameo."[2] The moment thus captured in the statue is an example of rhythmos, harmony and balance
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Glyptothek
The Glyptothek
Glyptothek
(German: [ɡlʏptoˈteːk] ( listen)) is a museum in Munich, Germany, which was commissioned by the Bavarian King Ludwig I to house his collection of Greek and Roman sculptures (hence γλυπτο- glypto- "sculpture", from the Greek verb γλύφειν glyphein "to carve"). It was designed by Leo von Klenze
Leo von Klenze
in the neoclassical style, and built from 1816 to 1830
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Capitoline Museums
The Capitoline Museums
Capitoline Museums
(Italian: Musei Capitolini) are a single museum containing a group of art and archeological museums in Piazza
Piazza
del Campidoglio, on top of the Capitoline Hill
Capitoline Hill
in Rome, Italy. The historic seats of the museums are Palazzo dei Conservatori
Palazzo dei Conservatori
and Palazzo Nuovo, facing on the central trapezoidal piazza in a plan conceived by Michelangelo
Michelangelo
in 1536 and executed over a period of more than 400 years. The history of the museums can be traced to 1471, when Pope Sixtus IV donated a collection of important ancient bronzes to the people of Rome
Rome
and located them on the Capitoline Hill
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Statens Museum For Kunst
Bus stop: 'Georg Brandes Plads, Parkmuseerne' Bus lines: 6A, 14, 26, 40, 42, 43, 184, 185, 150S, 173 E Train: S-tog and regional train to Østerport
Østerport
and Nørreport station Metro: Nørreport stationWebsite http://www.smk.dk/en/The National Gallery of Denmark
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Palazzo Massimo
The National Roman Museum
National Roman Museum
(Italian: Museo Nazionale Romano) is a museum, with several branches in separate buildings throughout the city of Rome, Italy
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Public Auction
A public auction is an auction held on behalf of a government in which the property to be auctioned is either property owned by the government, or property which is sold under the authority of a court of law or a government agency with similar authority. When the term " Government
Government
Auction" is used it generally means that specific auctioneers and agents are contracted to deal with stock that needs to be liquidated by various government bodies.[1]Contents1 Sale of property owned by the government 2 Sale of private property in a public aucti
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Vatican Museums
The Vatican Museums
Vatican Museums
(Italian: Musei Vaticani; Latin: Musea Vaticana) are Christian and art museums located within the city boundaries of the Vatican City. They display works from the immense collection amassed by Popes throughout the centuries including some of the most renowned classical sculptures and most important masterpieces of Renaissance art
Renaissance art
in the world. The museums contain roughly 70,000 works, of which 20,000 are on display,[3] and currently employ 640 people who work in 40 different administrative, scholarly, and restoration departments.[4] Pope
Pope
Julius II founded the museums in the early 16th century.[5] The Sistine Chapel, with its ceiling decorated by Michelangelo
Michelangelo
and the Stanze di Raffaello decorated by Raphael, are on the visitor route through the Vatican Museums
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Richard Payne Knight
(Richard)[2] Payne Knight (11 February 1751 – 23 April 1824) of Downton Castle
Downton Castle
in Herefordshire, and of 5 Soho Square,[3] London, England, was a classical scholar, connoisseur, archaeologist[4][5] and numismatist[5] best known for his theories of picturesque beauty and for his interest in ancient phallic imagery. He served as a Member of Parliament for Leominster (1780-4) and for Ludlow (1784-1806).[6]Contents1 Origins 2 Career 3 Death & succession 4 Will & Knight v. Knight (1840) 5 Books 6 Visual arts 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksOrigins[edit] He was born at Wormesley Grange, five miles north-west of Hereford
Hereford
in Herefordshire, the eldest son of Rev
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Marble
Marble
Marble
is a metamorphic rock composed of recrystallized carbonate minerals, most commonly calcite or dolomite. Marble
Marble
may be foliated. In geology the term "marble" refers to metamorphosed limestone, but its use in stonemasonry more broadly encompasses unmetamorphosed limestone.[1] Marble
Marble
is commonly used for sculpture and as a building material.Contents1 Etymology 2 Physical origins 3 Types 4 Uses4.1 Sculpture 4.2 Construction
Construction
marble5 Production5.1 Occupational safety5.1.1 United States6 Microbial degradation 7 Cultural associations 8 Artificial marble 9 Gallery 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksEtymologyCarlo Franzoni's sculptural marble chariot clock depicting Clio, the Greek muse of history. Marble
Marble
wall of Ruskeala
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Pope Clement XII
Pope
Pope
Clement XII (Latin: Clemens XII; 7 April 1652 – 6 February 1740), born Lorenzo Corsini, was Pope
Pope
from 12 July 1730 to his death in 1740. Clement presided over the growth of a surplus in the papal finances. He thus became known for building the new façade of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, beginning construction of the Trevi Fountain, and the purchase of Cardinal Alessandro Albani's collection of antiquities for the papal gallery
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Roman Villa
A Roman villa
Roman villa
was a country house built for the upper class in the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and the Roman Empire.Contents1 Typology and distribution 2 Architecture of the villa complex 3 Social history 4 Attested Roman villas 5 See also 6 Further reading 7 ReferencesTypology and distribution[edit] Pliny the Elder
Pliny the Elder
(23-79) distinguished two kinds of villas: the villa urbana, a country seat that could easily be reached from Rome
Rome
(or another city) for a night or two; and the villa rustica, the farm-house estate permanently occupied by the servants who generally had charge of the estate. The villa rustica centered on the villa itself, perhaps only seasonally occupied
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Galeazzo Ciano
Gian Galeazzo Ciano, 2nd Count
Count
of Cortellazzo and Buccari (Italian pronunciation: [ɡale'attso ˈtʃaːno]; 18 March 1903 – 11 January 1944) was Foreign Minister of Fascist Italy
Italy
from 1936 until 1943 and Benito Mussolini's son-in-law. On 11 January 1944, Count Ciano was shot by firing squad at the behest of his father-in-law, Mussolini, under pressure from Nazi Germany.[1] Ciano wrote and left behind a diary[2] that has been used as a source by several historians, including William Shirer
William Shirer
in his The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich and in the four-hour HBO
HBO
documentary-drama Mussolini and I.Contents1 Early life 2 Foreign Minister 3 Death 4 Children 5 In popular culture 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Bibliography7 External linksEarly life[edit]This section does not cite any sources
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Museo Nazionale Romano
The National Roman Museum
National Roman Museum
(Italian: Museo Nazionale Romano) is a museum, with several branches in separate buildings throughout the city of Rome, Italy
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Cambridge University Press
Cambridge
Cambridge
University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Granted letters patent by King Henry VIII in 1534, it is the world's oldest publishing house and the second-largest university press in the world (after Oxford University Press).[2][3] It also holds letters patent as the Queen's Printer.[4] The press's mission is "To further the University's mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence."[5] Cambridge
Cambridge
University Press is a department of the University of Cambridge
Cambridge
and is both an academic and educational publisher. With a global sales presence, publishing hubs, and offices in more than 40 countries, it publishes over 50,000 titles by authors from over 100 countries
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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