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Dionaea Muscipula
The Venus flytrap
Venus flytrap
(also referred to as Venus's flytrap or Venus' flytrap), Dionaea muscipula, is a carnivorous plant native to subtropical wetlands on the East Coast of the United States
East Coast of the United States
in North Carolina and South Carolina.[3] It catches its prey—chiefly insects and arachnids—with a trapping structure formed by the terminal portion of each of the plant's leaves, which is triggered by tiny hairs on their inner surfaces. When an insect or spider crawling along the leaves contacts a hair, the trap prepares to close, snapping shut only if another contact occurs within approximately twenty seconds of the first strike
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Bladderwort
Bivalvaria Polypompholyx UtriculariaDiversity233 speciesBladderwort distributionUtricularia, commonly and collectively called the bladderworts, is a genus of carnivorous plants consisting of approximately 233 species (precise counts differ based on classification opinions; a 2001 publication lists 215 species).[1] They occur in fresh water and wet soil as terrestrial or aquatic species across every continent except Antarctica. Utricularia
Utricularia
are cultivated for their flowers, which are often compared with those of snapdragons and orchids, especially amongst carnivorous plant enthusiasts. All Utricularia
Utricularia
are carnivorous and capture small organisms by means of bladder-like traps. Terrestrial species tend to have tiny traps that feed on minute prey such as protozoa and rotifers swimming in water-saturated soil
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Mucilage
Mucilage
Mucilage
is a thick, gluey substance produced by nearly all plants and some microorganisms.These microorganisms include protists which use it for their locomotion. Their movement is always opposite to the secretion of mucilage[1]. It is a polar glycoprotein and an exopolysaccharide. Mucilage
Mucilage
in plants plays a role in the storage of water and food, seed germination, and thickening membranes. Cacti (and other succulents) and flax seeds especially are rich sources of mucilage[2].Contents1 Occurrence 2 Human uses 3 Ecological implications for plants 4 Plant
Plant
sources 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOccurrence[edit] Exopolysaccharides are the most stabilising factor for microaggregates and are widely distributed in soils. Therefore, exopolysaccharide-producing "soil algae" play a vital role in the ecology of the world's soils
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List Of Colonial Governors Of North Carolina
This is a list of the colonial governors of North Carolina.Contents1 Governors of Roanoke Island, 1585-1587 2 Governors of Albemarle, 1664-1689 3 Deputy Governors of North Carolina, 1691-1712 4 Governors of North Carolina, 1712-1776 5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Works Cited7 External linksGovernors of Roanoke Island, 1585-1587[edit] Main article: Roanoke ColonyHistory of North CarolinaBy year Pre-statehood American Civil War Since 1900 Topics: African-Americans - Cities - Politics North Carolina portalv t eGovernor Took office Left officeRalph Lane 1585 1586John White 1587 1587Source:Governors of Albemarle, 1664-1689[edit] Main articles: Albemarle Settlements and Albemarle County, North CarolinaGovernor Took office Left officeWilliam Drummond 1664 1667Samuel Stephens 1667 1669Peter Carteret 1670 1672John Jenkins 1672 1675Thomas Eastchurch 16
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Arthur Dobbs
Arthur Dobbs
Arthur Dobbs
(2 April 1689 – 28 March 1765) was a British administrator who served as the seventh Governor of North Carolina from 1754 until his death in 1765.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Governor of North Carolina (1754-1765) 3 Other interests3.1 Discovery of the Venus flytrap 3.2 Northwest Passage4 Personal life 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Dobbs was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, where his mother had been sent because of political and religious unrest.[1][2] He was the eldest son of Richard Dobbs of Carrickfergus, County Antrim, who was soon to become Sheriff of Antrim in 1694 and Mary Stewart from Ballintoy. He was a neighbour and family friend of Jonathan Swift
Jonathan Swift
despite their political differences
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Peter Collinson (botanist)
Peter Collinson (January 1694 – 11 August 1768) was a Fellow of the Royal Society, an avid gardener, and the middleman for an international exchange of scientific ideas in mid-18th century London. He is best known for his horticultural friendship with John Bartram and his correspondence with Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin
about electricity.Contents1 Life and work 2 References2.1 Notes3 External linksLife and work[edit] Born the son of a London woolen draper, Collinson entered his father's business and developed an interest in botany. His family belonged to the Gracechurch Street
Gracechurch Street
Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (i.e
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Colony (biology)
In biology, a colony is composed of two or more conspecific individuals living in close association with, or connected to, one another. This association is usually for mutual benefit such as stronger defense or the ability to attack bigger prey.[1] It is a cluster of identical cells (clones) on the surface of (or within) a solid medium, usually derived from a single parent cell, as in bacterial colony.[2] In contrast, a solitary organism is one in which all individuals live independently and have all of the functions needed to survive and reproduce. Colonies, in the context of development, may be composed of two or more unitary (or solitary) organisms or be modular organisms. Unitary organisms have determinate development (set life stages) from zygote to adult form and individuals or groups of individuals (colonies) are visually distinct
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Curtis's Botanical Magazine
The Botanical Magazine; or Flower-Garden Displayed, is an illustrated publication which began in 1787.[1] The longest running botanical magazine, it is widely referred to by the subsequent name Curtis's Botanical Magazine. Each of the issues contains a description, in formal yet accessible language, and is renowned for featuring the work of two centuries of botanical illustrators. Many plants received their first publication on the pages, and the description given was enhanced by the keenly detailed illustrations.Contents1 History and profile 2 See also 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksHistory and profile[edit] The first issue, published on 1 February 1787,[2] was begun by William Curtis, as both an illustrated gardening and botanical journal. Curtis was an apothecary and botanist who held a position at Kew Gardens, who had published the highly praised (but poorly sold) Flora Londinensis
Flora Londinensis
a few years before
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William Curtis
William Curtis (11 January 1746 – 7 July 1799) was an English botanist and entomologist, who was born at Alton, Hampshire, where is the Curtis Museum. Curtis began as an apothecary, before turning his attention to botany and other natural history. The publications he prepared effectively reached a wider audience than early works on the subject had intended.[1] At the age of 25 he produced Instructions for collecting and preserving insects; particularly moths and butterflies.[2] Curtis was demonstrator of plants and Praefectus Horti at the Chelsea Physic Garden from 1771 to 1777. He established his own London Botanic Garden at Lambeth in 1779, moving to Brompton in 1789. He published Flora Londinensis (6 volumes, 1777–1798), a pioneering work in that it devoted itself to urban nature
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Photosynthesis
Photosynthesis
Photosynthesis
is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy into chemical energy that can later be released to fuel the organisms' activities (energy transformation). This chemical energy is stored in carbohydrate molecules, such as sugars, which are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water – hence the name photosynthesis, from the Greek φῶς, phōs, "light", and σύνθεσις, synthesis, "putting together".[1][2][3] In most cases, oxygen is also released as a waste product. Most plants, most algae, and cyanobacteria perform photosynthesis; such organisms are called photoautotrophs
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Petiole (botany)
In botany, the petiole (/ˈpiːtɪoʊl/) is the stalk that attaches the leaf blade to the stem.[1]:87 The petiole is the transition between the stem and the leaf blade.[2]:171 Outgrowths appearing on each side of the petiole in some species are called stipules. Leaves lacking a petiole are called sessile or epetiolate.Contents1 Description 2 Etymology 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (June 2015)Harvested rhubarb petioles with leaves attachedThe petiole is a stalk that attaches a leaf to the plant stem. In petiolate leaves, the leaf stalk (petiole) may be long, as in the leaves of celery and rhubarb, short or completely absent, in which case the blade attaches directly to the stem and is said to be sessile
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Anthocyanin
Anthocyanins (also anthocyans; from Greek: ἄνθος (anthos) "flower" and κυάνεος/κυανοῦς kyaneos/kyanous "dark blue") are water-soluble vacuolar pigments that, depending on their pH, may appear red, purple, or blue. Food plants rich in anthocyanins include the blueberry, raspberry, black rice, and black soybean, among many others that are red, blue, purple, or black. Some of the colors of autumn leaves are derived from anthocyanins.[1][2] Anthocyanins belong to a parent class of molecules called flavonoids synthesized via the phenylpropanoid pathway. They occur in all tissues of higher plants, including leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruits. Anthocyanins are derived from anthocyanidins by adding sugars.[3] They are odorless and moderately astringent
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Trichome
Trichomes (/ˈtraɪkoʊmz/ or /ˈtrɪkoʊmz/), from the Greek τρίχωμα (trichōma) meaning "hair", are fine outgrowths or appendages on plants, algae, lichens, and certain protists. They are of diverse structure and function. Examples are hairs, glandular hairs, scales, and papillae. A covering of any kind of hair on a plant is an indumentum, and the surface bearing them is said to be pubescent.Contents1 Algal trichomes 2 Plant
Plant
trichomes2.1 Aerial surface hairs3 Trichome
Trichome
and Root
Root
Hair
Hair
Development 4 Significance for taxonomy 5 Significance for plant molecular biology 6 Uses 7 Defense7.1 Stinging trichomes8 See also 9 ReferencesAlgal trichomes[edit] Certain, usually filamentous, algae have the terminal cell produced into an elongate hair-like structure called a trichome
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Aldrovanda Vesiculosa
Aldrovanda
Aldrovanda
vesiculosa, commonly known as the waterwheel plant, is the sole extant species in the flowering plant genus Aldrovanda
Aldrovanda
of the family Droseraceae. The plant captures small aquatic invertebrates using traps similar to those of the Venus flytrap. The traps are arranged in whorls around a central, free-floating stem, giving rise to the common name. This is one of the few plant species capable of rapid movement. While the genus Aldrovanda
Aldrovanda
is now monotypic, up to 19 extinct species are known in the fossil record.[3][4][5] While the species displays a degree of morphological plasticity between populations, A. vesiculosa possesses a very low genetic diversity across its entire range.[5] A. vesiculosa has declined over the last century to only 50 confirmed extant populations worldwide
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Homology (biology)
In biology, homology is the existence of shared ancestry between a pair of structures, or genes, in different taxa. A common example of homologous structures is the forelimbs of vertebrates, where the wings of bats, the arms of primates, the front flippers of whales and the forelegs of dogs and horses are all derived from the same ancestral tetrapod structure. Evolutionary biology
Evolutionary biology
explains homologous structures adapted to different purposes as the result of descent with modification from a common ancestor. Homology was explained by Charles Darwin's theory of evolution in 1859, but had been observed before this, from Aristotle onwards, and it was explicitly analysed by Pierre Belon in 1555
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Sundew
Drosera, commonly known as the sundews, is one of the largest genera of carnivorous plants, with at least 194 species.[1] These members of the family Droseraceae lure, capture, and digest insects using stalked mucilaginous glands covering their leaf surfaces. The insects are used to supplement the poor mineral nutrition of the soil in which the plants grow
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