HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Diogenes Of Babylon
Diogenes of Babylon (also known as Diogenes of Seleucia; Greek: Διογένης Βαβυλώνιος; Latin: Diogenes Babylonius; c. 230 – c. 150/140 BC[1]) was a Stoic philosopher. He was the head of the Stoic school in Athens, and he was one of three philosophers sent to Rome
Rome
in 155 BC. He wrote many works, but none of his writings survive, except as quotations by later writers.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Notes 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Born in Seleucia on the Tigris
Seleucia on the Tigris
in Babylonia, Diogenes was educated at Athens
Athens
under the auspices of Chrysippus
Chrysippus
and succeeded Zeno of Tarsus as head (scholarch) of the Stoic school there in the 2nd century BC. Among his pupils were Panaetius
Panaetius
and Antipater of Tarsus who succeeded him as scholarch
[...More...]

"Diogenes Of Babylon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Papyrus
Papyrus
Papyrus
/pəˈpaɪrəs/ is a material similar to thick paper that was used in ancient times as a writing surface. It was made from the pith of the papyrus plant, Cyperus papyrus, a wetland sedge.[1] Papyrus (plural: papyri) can also refer to a document written on sheets of such material, joined together side by side and rolled up into a scroll, an early form of a book.An official letter on a papyrus of the 3rd century BCE Papyrus
Papyrus
is first known to have been used in ancient Egypt (at least as far back as the First Dynasty), as the papyrus plant was once abundant across the Nile Delta. It was also used throughout the Mediterranean region and in the Kingdom of Kush
[...More...]

"Papyrus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Athena
Athena[Notes 2] or Athene,[Notes 3] often given the epithet Pallas,[Notes 4] is the ancient Greek goddess of wisdom, handicraft, and warfare,[1] who was later syncretized with the Roman goddess Minerva.[2] Athena
Athena
was regarded as the patron and protectress of various cities across Greece, particularly the city of Athens, from which she most likely received her name.[3] She is usually shown in art wearing a helmet and holding a spear. Her major symbols include owls, olive trees, snakes, and the Gorgoneion. From her origin as an Aegean palace goddess, Athena
Athena
was closely associated with the city. She was known as Polias and Poliouchos (both derived from polis, meaning "city-state"), and her temples were usually located atop the fortified Acropolis
Acropolis
in the central part of the city
[...More...]

"Athena" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lucian
Lucian
Lucian
of Samosata
Samosata
(/ˈluːʃən, ˈluːsiən/; Ancient Greek: Λουκιανὸς ὁ Σαμοσατεύς, Latin: Lucianus Samosatensis; about 125 AD – after 180 AD) was a Hellenized Syrian satirist and rhetorician[1] who is best known for his characteristic tongue-in-cheek style, with which he frequently ridiculed superstition, religious practices, and belief in the paranormal. Although his native language was probably Syriac, all of his extant works are written entirely in ancient Greek (mostly in the Atticized dialect popular during the Second Sophistic). Lucian
Lucian
was the son of a lower middle class family from the village of Samosata, the capital of the remote Roman province of Commagene. As a young man, he was apprenticed to his uncle to become a sculptor, but, after a failed attempt at sculpting, he ran away to pursue an education in Ionia
[...More...]

"Lucian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Epicureanism
Epicureanism
Epicureanism
is a system of philosophy based upon the teachings of the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus, founded around 307 BC. Epicurus was an atomic materialist, following in the steps of Democritus. His materialism led him to a general attack on superstition and divine intervention. Following Aristippus—about whom very little is known— Epicurus
Epicurus
believed that what he called "pleasure" was the greatest good, but that the way to attain such pleasure was to live modestly, to gain knowledge of the workings of the world, and to limit one's desires. This would lead one to attain a state of tranquility (ataraxia) and freedom from fear as well as an absence of bodily pain (aponia). The combination of these two states constitutes happiness in its highest form
[...More...]

"Epicureanism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Philodemus
Philodemus of Gadara
Gadara
(Greek: Φιλόδημος ὁ Γαδαρεύς, Philodēmos, "love of the people"; c. 110 – prob. c. 40 or 35 BC) was an Epicurean
Epicurean
philosopher and poet. He studied under Zeno of Sidon in Athens, before moving to Rome, and then to Herculaneum. He was once known chiefly for his poetry preserved in the Greek Anthology, but since the 18th century, many writings of his have been discovered among the charred papyrus rolls at the Villa of the Papyri
Villa of the Papyri
at Herculaneum. The task of excavating and deciphering these rolls is difficult, and work continues to this day. The works of Philodemus so far discovered include writings on ethics, theology, rhetoric, music, poetry, and the history of various philosophical schools
[...More...]

"Philodemus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Villa Of The Papyri
Coordinates: 40°48′28″N 14°20′40″E / 40.8078°N 14.3445°E / 40.8078; 14.3445 The Villa of the Papyri
Villa of the Papyri
(Italian: Villa dei Papiri, also known as Villa dei Pisoni), is named after its unique library of papyri (or scrolls), but is also one of the most luxurious houses in all of Herculaneum
Herculaneum
and in the Roman world.[1] Its luxury is shown by its exquisite architecture and by the very large number of outstanding works of art discovered, including frescoes, bronzes and marble sculpture[2] which constitute the largest collection of Greek and Roman sculptures ever discovered in a single context.[3] It is located in the current commune of Ercolano, southern Italy. It was situated on the ancient coastline below the volcano Vesuvius
Vesuvius
with nothing to obstruct the view of the sea
[...More...]

"Villa Of The Papyri" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Herculaneum
Located in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius, Herculaneum
Herculaneum
(Italian: Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows in 79 AD. Its ruins are located in the comune of Ercolano, Campania, Italy. As a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site, it is famous as one of the few ancient cities that can now be seen in much of its original splendour, as well as for having been lost, along with Pompeii, Stabiae, Oplontis and Boscoreale, in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius
Mount Vesuvius
in AD 79 that buried it. Unlike Pompeii, the deep pyroclastic material which covered it preserved wooden and other organic-based objects such as roofs, beds, doors, food and even some 300 skeletons which were discovered in recent years along the seashore
[...More...]

"Herculaneum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Epicurus
Epicurus
Epicurus
(/ˌɛpɪˈkjʊərəs, ˌɛpɪˈkjɔːrəs/;[2] Greek: Ἐπίκουρος, Epíkouros, "ally, comrade"; 341–270 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher who founded a school of philosophy now called Epicureanism. Only a few fragments and letters of Epicurus's 300 written works remain. Much of what is known about Epicurean philosophy derives from later followers and commentators. For Epicurus, the purpose of philosophy was to attain the happy, tranquil life, characterized by ataraxia—peace and freedom from fear—and aponia—the absence of pain—and by living a self-sufficient life surrounded by friends. He taught that the root of all human neurosis was death denial, and the tendency for human beings to assume that death will be horrific and painful, which he claimed causes unnecessary anxiety, selfish self-protective behaviors, and hypocrisy
[...More...]

"Epicurus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dictionary Of Greek And Roman Biography And Mythology
The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology
(1849, originally published 1844 under a slightly different title) is an encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. Edited by William Smith, the dictionary spans three volumes and 3,700 pages. It is a classic work of 19th-century lexicography. The work is a companion to Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography.[1]Contents1 Authors and scope 2 Use and availability today 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksAuthors and scope[edit]Excerpt from Philolaus
Philolaus
Pythagoras book, (Charles Peter Mason, 1870)The work lists thirty-five authors in addition to the editor, who is also an author for some definitions and articles
[...More...]

"Dictionary Of Greek And Roman Biography And Mythology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Leonhard Schmitz
Dr Leonhard Schmitz
Leonhard Schmitz
FRSE
FRSE
LLD (1807 – May 1890)[1] was a Prussian-born classical scholar and educational author, mainly active in the United Kingdom. He is sometimes referred to in the Anglicised version of his name Leonard Schmitz.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Schmitz was born in Eupen
Eupen
in what was then Prussia
Prussia
(now in Belgium) close to the Belgium/Germany border. He attended gymnasium in Aix-la-Chappelle to the east (now called Aachen
Aachen
and within modern day Germany). He lost his right arm in an accident at the age of 10, but nonetheless excelled academically
[...More...]

"Leonhard Schmitz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

William Smith (lexicographer)
Sir William Smith (20 May 1813 – 7 October 1893)[1] was an English lexicographer. He also made advances in the teaching of Greek and Latin in schools.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Publications3 Honours and death 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Smith was born in Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist
Nonconformist
parents. He attended the Madras House school of John Allen in Hackney.[2] Originally destined for a theological career, he instead was articled to a solicitor. In his spare time he taught himself classics, and when he entered University College London
University College London
he carried off both the Greek and Latin prizes
[...More...]

"William Smith (lexicographer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Antiochus Of Ascalon
Antiochus of Ascalon (/ænˈtaɪəkəs/; Greek: Άντίοχος ὁ Ἀσκαλώνιος; c. 125 – c. 68 BC)[1] was an Academic philosopher. He was a pupil of Philo of Larissa
Philo of Larissa
at the Academy, but he diverged from the Academic skepticism
Academic skepticism
of Philo
Philo
and his predecessors. He was a teacher of Cicero, and the first of a new breed of eclectics among the Platonists; he endeavoured to bring the doctrines of the Stoics
Stoics
and the Peripatetics
Peripatetics
into Platonism, and stated, in opposition to Philo, that the mind could distinguish true from false. In doing so, he claimed to be reviving the doctrines of the Old Academy
[...More...]

"Antiochus Of Ascalon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.