HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Dental Caries
Tooth
Tooth
decay, also known as dental caries or cavities, is a breakdown of teeth due to acids made by bacteria.[6] The cavities may be a number of different colors from yellow to black.[1] Symptoms may include pain and difficulty with eating.[1][2] Complications may include inflammation of the tissue around the tooth, tooth loss, and infection or abscess formation.[1][3] The cause of caries is acid from bacteria dissolving the hard tissues of the teeth (enamel, dentin and cementum).[4] The acid is produced by the bacteria when they breakdown food debris or sugar on the tooth surface.[4] Simple sugars in fo
[...More...]

"Dental Caries" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Osteolysis
Osteolysis is an active resorption of bone matrix by osteoclasts and can be interpreted as the reverse of ossification. Although osteoclasts are active during the natural formation of healthy bone the term "osteolysis" specifically refers to a pathological process. Osteolysis often occurs in the proximity of a prosthesis that causes either an immunological response or changes in the bone's structural load
[...More...]

"Osteolysis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Developing World
A developing country, also called a less developed country or an underdeveloped country, is a nation with a less developed industrial base and a low Human Development Index
Human Development Index
(HDI) relative to other countries.[1] However, this definition is not universally agreed upon. There is also no clear agreement on which countries fit this category.[2] A nation's GDP per capita
GDP per capita
compared with other nations can also be a reference point. The term "developing" describes a currently observed situation and not a changing dynamic or expected direction of progress. Since the late 1990s developing countries tended to demonstrate higher growth rates than developed countries.[3] There is criticism for using the term developing country. The term implies inferiority of a developing country or undeveloped country compared with a developed country, which many countries dislike
[...More...]

"Developing World" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antihistamines
Antihistamines are drugs which treat allergic rhinitis and other allergies.[1] Antihistamines can give relief when a person has nasal congestion, sneezing, or hives because of pollen, dust mites, or animal allergy.[1] Typically people take antihistamines as an inexpensive, generic, over-the-counter drug with few side effects.[1] As an alternative to taking an antihistamine, people who suffer from allergies can instead avoid the substance which irritates them.[1] Antihistamines are usually for short-term treatment.[1] Chronic allergies increase the risk of health problems which antihistamines might not treat, including asthma, sinusitis, and lower respiratory tract infection.[1] Doctors recommend that people talk to them before any longer term use of antihistamines.[1] Although typical people use the word “antihistamine” to describe drugs for treating allergies, doctors and scientists use the term to describe a class of drug that opposes the activity of histamine receptors in the bo
[...More...]

"Antihistamines" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Specialty (medicine)
A specialty, or speciality, in medicine is a branch of medical practice. After completing medical school, physicians or surgeons usually further their medical education in a specific specialty of medicine by completing a multiple year residency to become a medical specialist.[1]Contents1 History of medical specialization 2 Classification of medical specialization 3 Specialties that are common worldwide 4 List of specialties recognized in the European Union and European Economic Area 5 List of North American medical specialties and others 6 Physician
Physician
compensation 7 Specialties by country7.1 Australia and New Zealand 7.2 Canada 7.3 Germany 7.4 India 7.5 United States 7.6 Specialty and Physician
Physician
Location8 Other uses 9 Training 10 Satisfaction 11 See also 12 ReferencesHistory of medical specialization[edit] To a certain extent, medical practitioners have always been specialized
[...More...]

"Specialty (medicine)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gums
The gums or gingiva (plural: gingivae), consist of the mucosal tissue that lies over the mandible and maxilla inside the mouth. Gum health and disease can have an effect on general health.[1]Contents1 Structure1.1 Marginal gums 1.2 Attached gum 1.3 Interdental gum2 Characteristics of healthy gums2.1 Color 2.2 Contour 2.3 Texture 2.4 Reaction to disturbance3 Clinical significance 4 See also 5 ReferencesStructure[edit] The gums are part of the soft tissue lining of the mouth. They surround the teeth and provide a seal around them. Unlike the soft tissue linings of the lips and cheeks, most of the gums are tightly bound to the underlying bone which helps resist the friction of food passing over them. Thus when healthy, it presents an effective barrier to the barrage of periodontal insults to deeper tissue
[...More...]

"Gums" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Regeneration (biology)
In biology, regeneration is the process of renewal, restoration, and growth that makes genomes, cells, organisms, and ecosystems resilient to natural fluctuations or events that cause disturbance or damage.[1] Every species is capable of regeneration, from bacteria to humans.[2][3] Regeneration can either be complete[4] where the new tissue is the same as the lost tissue,[4] or incomplete[5] where after the necrotic tissue comes fibrosis.[5] At its most elementary level, regeneration is mediated by the molecular processes of gene regulation.[6][7] Regeneration in biology, however, mainly refers to the morphogenic processes that characterize the phenotypic plasticity of traits allowing multi-cellular organisms to repair and maintain the integrity of their physiological and morphological states
[...More...]

"Regeneration (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World Health Organization
The World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations
United Nations
that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948 headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO
WHO
is a member of the United Nations
United Nations
Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations. The constitution of the World Health Organization
World Health Organization
had been signed by 61 countries on 7 April 1948, with the first meeting of the World Health Assembly finishing on 24 July 1948. It incorporated the Office International d'Hygiène Publique and the League of Nations
League of Nations
Health Organization. Since its creation, it has played a leading role in the eradication of smallpox
[...More...]

"World Health Organization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Developed World
A developed country, industrialized country, more developed country, or "more economically developed country" (MEDC), is a sovereign state that has a highly developed economy and advanced technological infrastructure relative to other less industrialized nations. Most commonly, the criteria for evaluating the degree of economic development are gross domestic product (GDP), gross national product (GNP), the per capita income, level of industrialization, amount of widespread infrastructure and general standard of living.[1] Which criteria are to be used and which countries can be classified as being developed are subjects of debate. Developed countries have post-industrial economies, meaning the service sector provides more wealth than the industrial sector. They are contrasted with developing countries, which are in the process of industrialization, or undeveloped countries, which are pre-industrial and almost entirely agrarian
[...More...]

"Developed World" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Halitosis
Bad breath, also known as halitosis, is a symptom in which a noticeably unpleasant odor is present on the breath.[1] It can result in anxiety among those affected.[1] It is also associated with depression and symptoms of obsessive compulsive disorder.[1] Concerns of bad breath may be divided into genuine and non-genuine cases.[2] Of those who have genuine bad breath, about 85% of cases come from inside the mouth.[1] The remaining cases are believed to be due to disorders in the nose, sinuses, throat, lungs, esophagus, or stomach.[4] Rarely, bad breath can be due to an underlying medical condition such as liver failure or ketoacidosis.[2] Non-genuine cases occur when someone feels they have bad breath but someone else cannot detect it.[2] This is estimated to make up between 5% and 72% of cases.[2] The treatment depends on the underlying cause.[1] Initial efforts may include tongue cleaning, mouthwash, and flossing.[1] Tentative evidence supports the use of mouthwash containing chlorhex
[...More...]

"Halitosis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cementum
Cementum[1] is a specialized calcified substance covering the root of a tooth. The cementum is the part of the periodontium that attaches the teeth to the alveolar bone by anchoring the periodontal ligament.[2]Contents1 Structure1.1 Cementoenamel junction 1.2 Dentinocemental junction 1.3 Types 1.4 Composition 1.5 Development2 Clinical significance2.1 DNA studies3 See also 4 References 5 External linksStructure[edit] Cementum
Cementum
situated around a human molarThe cells of cementum are the entrapped cementoblasts, the cementocytes. Each cementocyte lies in its lacuna, similar to the pattern noted in bone. These lacunae also have canaliculi or canals. Unlike those in bone, however, these canals in cementum do not contain nerves, nor do they radiate outward
[...More...]

"Cementum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Soft Tissue
In anatomy, soft tissue includes the tissues that connect, support, or surround other structures and organs of the body, not being hard tissue such as bone. Soft tissue
Soft tissue
includes tendons, ligaments, fascia, skin, fibrous tissues, fat, and synovial membranes (which are connective tissue), and muscles, nerves and blood vessels (which are not connective tissue).[1] It is sometimes defined by what it is not
[...More...]

"Soft Tissue" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis
Cavernous sinus
Cavernous sinus
thrombosis (CST) is the formation of a blood clot within the cavernous sinus, a cavity at the base of the brain which drains deoxygenated blood from the brain back to the heart. The cause is usually from a spreading infection in the nose, sinuses, ears, or teeth. Staphylococcus aureus
Staphylococcus aureus
and Streptococcus
Streptococcus
are often the associated bacteria. Cavernous sinus
Cavernous sinus
thrombosis symptoms include: decrease or loss of vision, chemosis, exophthalmos (bulging eyes), headaches, and paralysis of the cranial nerves which course through the cavernous sinus
[...More...]

"Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carbohydrate
A carbohydrate is a biomolecule consisting of carbon (C), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) atoms, usually with a hydrogen–oxygen atom ratio of 2:1 (as in water); in other words, with the empirical formula Cm(H2O)n (where m may be different from n).[1] This formula holds true for monosaccharides. Some exceptions exist; for example, deoxyribose, a sugar component of DNA,[2] has the empirical formula C5H10O4.[3] The carbohydrates are technically hydrates of carbon;[4] structurally it is more accurate to view them as aldoses and ketoses .[5] The term is most common in biochemistry, where it is a synonym of 'saccharide', a group that includes sugars, starch, and cellulose. The saccharides are divided into four chemical groups: monosaccharides, disaccharides, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides
[...More...]

"Carbohydrate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Adhesion
Note 1: Adhesion
Adhesion
requires energy that can come from chemical and/or physical linkages, the latter being reversible when enough energy is applied. Note 2: In biology, adhesion reflects the behavior of cells shortly after contact to the surface. Note 3: In surgery, adhesion is used when two tissues fuse unexpectedly.[1] Adhesion
Adhesion
is the tendency of dissimilar particles or surfaces to cling to one another (cohesion refers to the tendency of similar or identical particles/surfaces to cling to one another). The forces that cause adhesion and cohesion can be divided into several types. The intermolecular forces responsible for the function of various kinds of stickers and sticky tape fall into the categories of chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, and diffusive adhesion
[...More...]

"Adhesion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Buffering Capacity
A buffer solution (more precisely, pH buffer or hydrogen ion buffer) is an aqueous solution consisting of a mixture of a weak acid and its conjugate base, or vice versa. Its pH changes very little when a small amount of strong acid or base is added to it. Buffer solutions are used as a means of keeping pH at a nearly constant value in a wide variety of chemical applications. In nature, there are many systems that use buffering for pH regulation. For example, the bicarbonate buffering system is used to regulate the pH of blood
[...More...]

"Buffering Capacity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.