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Democratic-Republican Party
The Democratic-Republican Party
Democratic-Republican Party
was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison
James Madison
between 1791 and 1793 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party
Federalist Party
run by Alexander Hamilton, who was secretary of the treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration.[5] From 1801 to 1825, the new party controlled the presidency and Congress as well as most states during the First Party System. It began in 1791 as one faction in Congress and included many politicians who had been opposed to the new constitution. They called themselves "Republicans" after their ideology, republicanism. They distrusted the Federalist commitment to republicanism
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Monarchy
A monarchy is a form of government in which a group, generally a family representing a dynasty (aristocracy), embodies the country's national identity and its head, the monarch, exercises the role of sovereignty. The actual power of the monarch may vary from purely symbolic (crowned republic), to partial and restricted (constitutional monarchy), to completely autocratic (absolute monarchy). Traditionally the monarch's post is inherited and lasts until death or abdication. In contrast, elective monarchies require the monarch to be elected.[1] Both types have further variations as there are widely divergent structures and traditions defining monarchy. For example, in some[which?] elected monarchies only pedigrees are taken into account for eligibility of the next ruler, whereas many hereditary monarchies impose requirements regarding the religion, age, gender, mental capacity, etc
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Agrarianism
Agrarianism is a social philosophy or political philosophy which values rural society as superior to urban society, the independent farmer as superior to the paid worker, and sees farming as a way of life that can shape the ideal social values.[1] It stresses the superiority of a simpler rural life as opposed to the complexity of city life.Contents1 Philosophy 2 History 3 Agrarian parties3.1 Africa3.1.1 Tunisia3.2 Europe3.2.1 Bulgaria 3.2.2 Czechoslovakia 3.2.3 France 3.2.4 Ireland 3.2.5 Latvia 3.2.6 Lithuania 3.2.7 Poland 3.2.8 Romania 3.2.9 Serbia 3.2.10 Ukraine3.3 Oceania3.3.1 Australia 3.3.2 New Zealand4 Back-to-the-land movement 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading7.1 Agrarian values 7.2 Primary sources 7.3 Europe 7.4 North America 7.5 Global South8 External linksPhilosophy[edit] M
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French Revolutionary Wars
 Holy Roman Empire Austria[note 1]  Prussia
Prussia
(1792–95)[note 2]   Great Britain
Great Britain
(1793–1800)[note 3]
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First Bank Of The United States
The President, Directors and Company, of the Bank of the United States, commonly known as the First Bank of the United States, was a national bank, chartered for a term of twenty years, by the United States Congress on February 25, 1791. It followed the Bank of North America, the nation's first de facto central bank. Establishment of the Bank of the United States was part of a three-part expansion of federal fiscal and monetary power, along with a federal mint and excise taxes, championed by Alexander Hamilton, first Secretary of the Treasury
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Elections In United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Congressional districts
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Blue
Blue
Blue
is one of the three primary colours of pigments in painting and traditional colour theory, as well as in the RGB colour model. It lies between violet and green on the spectrum of visible light. The eye perceives blue when observing light with a dominant wavelength between approximately 450 and 495 nanometres. Most blues contain a slight mixture of other colors; azure contains some green, while ultramarine contains some violet. The clear daytime sky and the deep sea appear blue because of an optical effect known as Rayleigh scattering. An optical effect called Tyndall scattering
Tyndall scattering
explains blue eyes. Distant objects appear more blue because of another optical effect called atmospheric perspective. Blue
Blue
has been an important colour in art and decoration since ancient times
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White
White
White
is the lightest color and is achromatic (having no hue), because it fully reflects and scatters all the visible wavelengths of light. It is the color of fresh snow, chalk, and milk, and is the opposite of black. In ancient Egypt
Egypt
and ancient Rome, priestesses wore white as a symbol of purity, and Romans wore a white toga as a symbol of citizenship. In the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and Renaissance a white unicorn symbolized chastity, and a white lamb sacrifice and purity. It was the royal color of the Kings of France, and of the monarchist movement that opposed the Bolsheviks
Bolsheviks
during the Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
(1917–1922)
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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Southern United States
The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland and the South, is a region of the United States
United States
of America. The South does not fully match the geographic south of the United States but is commonly defined as including the states that fought for the Confederate States of America
Confederate States of America
in the American Civil War.[2] The Deep South
Deep South
is fully located in the southeastern corner
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Red
Red
Red
is the color at the end of the visible spectrum of light, next to orange and opposite violet. It has a dominant wavelength of approximately 625–740 nanometres.[1] It is a primary color in the RGB color model
RGB color model
and the CMYK color model, and is the complementary color of cyan. Reds range from the brilliant yellow-tinged scarlet and vermillion to bluish-red crimson, and vary in shade from the pale red pink to the dark red burgundy.[2] The red sky at sunset results from Rayleigh scattering, while the red color of the Grand Canyon
Grand Canyon
and other geological features is caused by hematite or red ochre, both forms of iron oxide
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List Of Political Ideologies
In social studies, a political ideology is a certain set of ethical ideals, principles, doctrines, myths or symbols of a social movement, institution, class or large group that explains how society should work and offers some political and cultural blueprint for a certain social order. A political ideology largely concerns itself with how to allocate power and to what ends it should be used. Some political parties follow a certain ideology very closely while others may take broad inspiration from a group of related ideologies without specifically embracing any one of them. The popularity of an ideology is in part due to the influence of moral entrepreneurs, who sometimes act in their own interests. Political ideologies have two dimensions:Goals: how society should be organized. Methods: the most appropriate way to achieve this goal.An ideology is a collection of ideas. Typically, each ideology contains certain ideas on what it considers to be the best form of government (e.g
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New England
New England
New England
is a geographical region comprising six states of the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.[a] It is bordered by the state of New York to the west and by the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec
Quebec
to the northeast and north, respectively. The Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
is to the east and southeast, and Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound
is to the south. Boston
Boston
is New England's largest city as well as the capital of Massachusetts
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Northeastern United States
The Northeastern United States, also referred to as the American Northeast or simply the Northeast, is a geographical region of the United States
United States
bordered to the north by Canada, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the Southern United States, and to the west by the Midwestern United States
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Politics Of United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R) Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
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States' Rights
In American political discourse, states' rights are political powers held for the state governments rather than the federal government according to the United States
United States
Constitution, reflecting especially the enumerated powers of Congress and the Tenth Amendment. The enumerated powers that are listed in the Constitution include exclusive federal powers, as well as concurrent powers that are shared with the states, and all of those powers are contrasted with the reserved powers—also called states' rights—that only the states possess.[1][2]Contents1 Background 2 Text 3 Controversy to 18653.1 Alien and Sedition Acts 3.2 Nullification Crisis
Nullification Crisis
of 1832 3.3 Civil War3.3.1 Southern arguments 3.3.2 Northern arguments 3.3.3 Texas
Texas
v
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