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Demigod
The term demigod or demi-god can refer to a minor deity, a mortal or immortal who is the offspring of a god and a human, or a figure who has attained divine status after death.Contents1 Etymology 2 Classical 3 Modern use 4 Hinduism 5 China 6 See also 7 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The English term "demigod" is a calque of the Latin semideus, "half-god",[1] which was probably coined by the Roman poet Ovid
Ovid
in reference to less important gods, such as dryads.[2] Classical[edit] In the ancient Greek and Roman world, the word did not have a consistent definition and was rarely used.[3][4] The earliest recorded use of the term is by the archaic Greek poets Homer
Homer
and Hesiod. Both describe dead heroes as hemitheoi, or "half gods"
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Arjuna
Arjuna
Arjuna
(in Devanagari: अर्जुन arjuna) is the main central character of the ancient Indian epic Mahabharata
Mahabharata
and plays a key role in the Bhagavad Gita
Bhagavad Gita
alongside Krishna. Arjuna
Arjuna
was the son of Indra, the king of the celestials, born of Kunti, the first wife of King Pandu
Pandu
in the Kuru Kingdom. In a previous birth he was a saint named Nara who was the lifelong companion of another saint Narayana
Narayana
an incarnation of Lord Vishnu
Lord Vishnu
who took rebirth as Lord Krishna. He was the third of the Pandava
Pandava
brothers and was married to Draupadi, Ulupi, Chitrangada and Subhadra
Subhadra
(Krishna's and Balarama's sister) at different times. His children included Srutakarma, Iravan, Babruvahana, and Abhimanyu
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Garuda
The Garuda
Garuda
is a legendary bird or bird-like creature found in Hindu, Buddhist and Jain
Jain
mythology.[1][2][3] He is variously the vehicle mount (vahana) of the Hindu god Vishnu, a dharma-protector and Astasena in Buddhism, and the Yaksha of the Jain
Jain
Tirthankara Shantinatha.[2][3][4] Garuda
Garuda
is described as the king of birds and a Kite-like figure.[5][6] He is shown either in zoomorphic form (giant bird with partially open wings) or an anthropomorphic form (man with wings and some bird features). Garuda
Garuda
is generally a protector with power to swiftly go anywhere, ever watchful and an enemy of the serpent.[1][6][7] He is also known as Tarkshya and Vynateya.[8] Garuda
Garuda
is a part of state insignia in India, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia
Cambodia
and Indonesia
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Faun
The faun (Latin: faunus, Ancient Greek: φαῦνος, phaunos, pronounced [pʰaunos]) is a mythological half human–half goat creature appear in Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome
times. The goat man, more commonly affiliated with the Satyrs of Greek mythology or Fauns of Roman, is a bipedal creature with the legs of a goat and the torso of a man and is often depicted with goat's horns. These creatures in turn borrowed their appearance from the god Pan of the Greek pantheon. They were a symbol of fertility, and their chieftain was Silenus, a minor deity of Greek mythology.[1]Contents1 Origins 2 In art 3 In fiction 4 See also 5 ReferencesOrigins[edit] Romans believed fauns inspired fear in men traveling in lonely, remote or wild places. They were also capable of guiding humans in need, as in the fable of The Satyr
Satyr
and the Traveller, in the title of which Latin authors substituted the word Faunus
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John Milton
John Milton
John Milton
(9 December 1608 – 8 November 1674) was an English poet, polemicist, man of letters, and civil servant for the Commonwealth of England
Commonwealth of England
under Oliver Cromwell. He wrote at a time of religious flux and political upheaval, and is best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost
Paradise Lost
(1667), written in blank verse. Milton's poetry and prose reflect deep personal convictions, a passion for freedom and self-determination, and the urgent issues and political turbulence of his day
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Paradise Lost
Paradise Lost
Paradise Lost
is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton
John Milton
(1608–1674). The first version, published in 1667, consisted of ten books with over ten thousand lines of verse. A second edition followed in 1674, arranged into twelve books (in the manner of Virgil's Aeneid) with minor revisions throughout and a note on the versification.[1][2] It is considered by critics to be Milton's major work, and it helped solidify his reputation as one of the greatest English poets of his time.[3] The poem concerns the biblical story of the Fall of Man: the temptation of Adam and Eve
Adam and Eve
by the fallen angel Satan
Satan
and their expulsion from the Garden of Eden
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Angel
An angel is generally a supernatural being found in various religions and mythologies. In Abrahamic religions
Abrahamic religions
and Zoroastrianism, angels are often depicted as benevolent celestial beings who act as intermediaries between God
God
or Heaven
Heaven
and Humanity.[1][2] Other roles of angels include protecting and guiding human beings, and carrying out God's tasks.[3] Within Abrahamic religions, angels are often organized into hierarchies, although such rankings may vary between sects in each religion, and are given specific names or titles, such as Gabriel
Gabriel
or "Destroying angel". The term "angel" has also been expanded to various notions of spirits or figures found in other religious traditions
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Hinduism
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Deva (Hinduism)
Deva (/ˈdeɪvə/; Sanskrit: देव, Devá) means "heavenly, divine, anything of excellence", and is also one of the terms for a deity in Hinduism.[1] Deva is a masculine term; the feminine equivalent is devi. In the earliest Vedic literature, all supernatural beings are called Asuras.[2][3] The concepts and legends evolve in ancient Indian literature, and by the late Vedic period, benevolent supernatural beings are referred to as Deva-Asuras
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Hanuman
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Nandi (bull)
Shiva
Shiva
- ShaktiSadasiva Rudra Bhairava Parvati Durga KaliGanesha Murugan OthersScriptures and textsAgamas and TantrasVedas SvetasvataraTirumurai Shivasutras VachanasPhilosophyThree ComponentsPati Pashu PasamThree bondagesAnava Karma Maya 36 Tattvas YogaPracticesVibhuti Rudraksha Panchakshara Bilva Maha Shivaratri Yamas-Niyamas Guru-Linga-JangamSchoolsAdi MargamPashupata Kalamukha Kapalika
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Shiva
Shiva
Shiva
(/ˈʃiːvə, ˈʃɪ-/; Sanskrit: शिव, IAST: Śiva, lit. the auspicious one) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism. He is the Supreme Being within Shaivism, one of the major traditions within contemporary Hinduism.[10][11] Shiva
Shiva
is the "destroyer of evil and the transformer" within the Trimurti, the Hindu
Hindu
trinity that includes Brahma
Brahma
and Vishnu.[1][12] In Shaivism
Shaivism
tradition, Shiva
Shiva
is the Supreme being who creates, protects and transforms the universe.[13][14][15] In the goddess tradition of Hinduism
Hinduism
called Shaktism, the goddess is described as supreme, yet Shiva
Shiva
is revered along with Vishnu
Vishnu
and Brahma
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Vishnu
Vishnu
Vishnu
( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
pronunciation: [vɪʂɳu]; Sanskrit: विष्णु, IAST: Viṣṇu) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism, and the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
in its Vaishnavism
Vaishnavism
tradition.[5][6] Vishnu
Vishnu
is the "preserver" in the Hindu
Hindu
trinity (Trimurti) that includes Brahma
Brahma
and Shiva.[7] In Vaishnavism, Vishnu
Vishnu
is identical to the formless metaphysical concept called Brahman, the supreme, the Svayam Bhagavan, who takes various avatars as "the preserver, protector" whenever the world is threatened with evil, chaos, and destructive forces.[8] His avatars most notably include Rama
Rama
in the Ramayana
Ramayana
and Krishna
Krishna
in the Mahabharata
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Demagogue
A demagogue /ˈdɛməɡɒɡ/ (from Greek δημαγωγός, a popular leader, a leader of a mob, from δῆμος, people, populace, the commons + ἀγωγός leading, leader)[1] or rabble-rouser is a leader in a democracy who gains popularity by exploiting prejudice and ignorance among the common people, whipping up the passions of the crowd and shutting down reasoned deliberation.[1][2][3][4] Demagogues overturn established customs of political conduct, or promise or threaten to do so. Demagogues have appeared in democracies since ancient Athens
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Madurai Veeran (Hinduism)
Madurai
Madurai
Veeran (Tamil: மதுரை வீரன், lit. 'Warrior of Madurai', also known as Muthu Kumaran) is a Tamil folk deity popular in southern Tamil Nadu, India. His name was derived as a result of his association with the city of Madurai
Madurai
as a protector of the city. His worship is also popular amongst the Tamil diaspora.Contents1 Origin 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksOrigin[edit] The folklore is that Madurai
Madurai
was troubled by Kallar bandits and the pandyan king ordered Veeran to resist. Veeran then met Vellaiyammal, a royal danseuse, who was attracted to him because of his looks and skill in various arts. She asked him to teach her the Natya Shastra (tenets of dancing). Pandya king, who was himself attracted to Vellaiyammal, did not appreciate this development and viewed this as an affair
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Karuppu Sami
Karuppu Sami
Karuppu Sami
is one of the regional Tamil male deities popular among the rural social groups of Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
and parts of Kerala. He is one of the 21 associate folk-deities of Ayyanar
Ayyanar
and is hence one of the so-called Kaval Deivams of the Tamils.Contents1 Temples and shrines 2 Worship 3 Annual festivals 4 See alsoTemples and shrines[edit] Karuppu Sami
Karuppu Sami
temple is mostly found in the outskirts of the Village. Usually, the whole village contributes to the maintenance of the temple. These temples do not have traditional Gopurams and have large statues of Gods with large eyes, holding weapons like bow and arrow, swords, aruval and others protective weapons
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