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Decision Points
Decision Points
Decision Points
is a memoir by former U.S. President George W. Bush.[1] It was released on November 9, 2010, and the release was accompanied by national television appearances and a national tour. The book surpassed sales of two million copies less than two months after its release,[2] breaking the record previously held by former President Bill Clinton’s memoir My Life. Decision Points
Decision Points
also opened at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list.[3]Contents1 Content 2 Advance and publicity campaign 3 Reactions 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksContent[edit] Bush's 481-page memoir is broken up into 14 chapters. The first two chapters are about his life before the presidency. The first chapter is about notable events in his earlier life such as his decision to quit drinking in 1986. The second chapter is about his decision to run for Governor of Texas, and then President of the United States
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Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles, California
since 1881
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Dick Cheney
Richard Bruce Cheney (/ˈtʃeɪni/;[2] born January 30, 1941) is an American politician who served as the 46th Vice President of the United States from 2001 to 2009. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, Cheney was primarily raised in Sumner, Nebraska, and Casper, Wyoming.[3] He attended Yale
Yale
and then the University of Wyoming, at the latter of which he earned a BA and an MA in Political Science. He began his political career as an intern for Congressman William A. Steiger, eventually working his way into the White House
White House
during the Nixon and Ford administrations, where he later served as the White House
White House
Chief of Staff, from 1975 to 1977. In 1978, Cheney was elected to the U.S
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Saddam Hussein
Saddam
Saddam
Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (/hʊˈseɪn/;[5] Arabic: صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي Ṣaddām Ḥusayn ʿAbd al-Maǧīd al-Tikrītī;[a] 28 April 1937[b] – 30 December 2006) was President of Iraq
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Vietnam War
North Vietnamese victoryWithdrawal of American-led forces from Indochina Communist governments take power in South Vietnam, Cambodia
Cambodia
and Laos South Vietnam
South Vietnam
is annexed
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Al-Qaeda
Al-Qaeda
Al-Qaeda
Central (1988–present) Al-Qaeda in Iraq
Al-Qaeda in Iraq
(2004–2013, became
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Osama Bin Laden
Maktab al-Khidamat (1984–1988) Al-Qaeda
Al-Qaeda
(1988–2011)Years of service 1984–May 2, 2011Rank General Emir
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Bailout
A bailout is a colloquial term for giving financial support to a company or country which faces serious financial difficulty or bankruptcy. It may also be used to allow a failing entity to fail gracefully without spreading contagion.[1] A bailout can, but does not necessarily, avoid an insolvency process. The term is maritime in origin being the act of removing water from a sinking vessel using a smaller bucket.[2] A bailout differs from the term bail-in (coined in the 2010s) under which the bondholders and/or depositors of global systemically important financial institutions (G-SIFIs) are forced to participate in the process, but taxpayers supposedly are not. Some governments have the power to participate in the insolvency process: for instance, the U.S. government intervened in the General Motors
General Motors
bailout of 2009–2013.[3]Contents1 Overview 2 Bailout
Bailout
vs
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John McCain
John Sidney McCain III (born August 29, 1936) is an American politician serving as the senior United States Senator
United States Senator
from Arizona since 1987. He was the Republican nominee for President of the United States in the 2008 election, which he lost to Barack Obama. McCain graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy
U.S. Naval Academy
in 1958 and followed his father and grandfather—both four-star admirals—into the United States Navy. He became a naval aviator and flew ground-attack aircraft from aircraft carriers. During the Vietnam
Vietnam
War, he was almost killed in the 1967 USS Forrestal fire. While McCain was on a bombing mission over Hanoi
Hanoi
in October 1967, he was shot down, seriously injured, and captured by the North Vietnamese. He was a prisoner of war until 1973. McCain experienced episodes of torture and refused an out-of-sequence early repatriation offer
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Barack Obama
Pre-presidency Illinois
Illinois
State Senator 2004 DNC keynote address U.S
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Southern Methodist University
Southern Methodist University
Methodist University
(commonly referred to as SMU) is a private research university in metropolitan Dallas, with its main campus spanning portions of the town of Highland Park and the cities of University Park and Dallas.[7] Founded in 1911 by the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, SMU also operates satellite campuses in Plano, Texas
Texas
and Taos, New Mexico. SMU is owned by the South Central Jurisdiction of the United Methodist Church.[8] As of the Fall 2017 semester, the university's 11,789 students are 6,452 undergraduates and 5,337 postgraduates.[4] The university is comprised of seven schools, including the Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Bobby B
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Dallas
Dallas, officially City
City
of Dallas, is within the 4th most populous metropolitan area in the United States.[8] Dallas
Dallas
is a modern metropolis city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas
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Tim Dowling
Tim Dowling
Tim Dowling
(born June 1963, Connecticut,[3] USA) is an American journalist and author who writes a weekly column in The Guardian
The Guardian
about his life with his family in London.Contents1 Career1.1 Published work2 Personal life 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] Dowling worked in data entry for a films database before he became a freelance journalist, first working for GQ, then women's magazines and the Independent on Sunday.[4] He is a columnist for The Guardian
The Guardian
and has a weekly column in the paper's Saturday magazine, Weekend. His column replaced Jon Ronson's in 2007. He writes observational columns, often about his wife.[5] Sam Leith of The Guardian
The Guardian
noted that "Dowling's a very fresh and smart writer, as he needs to be
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Memoir
A memoir (US: /ˈmemwɑːr/;[1] from French: mémoire: memoria, meaning memory or reminiscence) is a collection of memories that an individual writes about moments or events, both public or private, that took place in the subject's life.[2][3] The assertions made in the work are understood to be factual. While memoir has historically been defined as a subcategory of biography or autobiography since the late 20th century, the genre is differentiated in form, presenting a narrowed focus. A biography or autobiography tells the story "of a life", while a memoir often tells a story "from a life", such as touchstone events and turning points from the author's life
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The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was known from 1821 until 1959 as the Manchester
Manchester
Guardian. Along with its sister papers The Observer and the Guardian Weekly, The Guardian
The Guardian
is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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