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Deceangli
The Deceangli
Deceangli
or Deceangi (Welsh: Tegeingl[1][2]) were one of the Celtic tribes living in Britain, prior to the Roman invasion of the island. The tribe lived in Wales
Wales
but it is uncertain whether their territory covered only the modern counties of Flintshire,[3] Denbighshire
Denbighshire
and part of Cheshire in what is now England or whether it extended further west.[4] They lived in hill forts running in a chain through the Clwydian Range
Clwydian Range
and their tribal capital was Canovium.[5] Assaults on the Welsh tribes were made under the legate Publius Ostorius Scapula who attacked the Deceangli
Deceangli
in 48 AD.[4] They appear to have surrendered with little resistance, unlike the Silures and the Ordovices
Ordovices
who put up a long and bitter resistance to Roman rule
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Celt
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle Dnieper Bronze
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Caerhun
Caerhun
Caerhun
(Welsh: Caerhûn) is a scattered rural community, and former civil parish, on the west bank of the River Conwy. It lies to the south of Henryd
Henryd
and the north of Dolgarrog, in Conwy
Conwy
County Borough, Wales, and includes the villages of Llanbedr-y-cennin, Rowen, Tal-y-bont and Ty'n-y-groes. At the 2001 census, it had a population of 1,200,[1] increasing to 1,292 at the 2011 census.[2]Contents1 Features 2 Governance 3 References 4 External linksFeatures[edit] See also: Canovium Surrounding the 14th-century parish church of St. Mary
St. Mary
are the banks of the Roman fort of Canovium. The excavations of the Roman site were directed by P.K
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Great Britain
Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.[5][note 1] In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan.[7][8] The island of Ireland is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.[9] The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons. Politically, the island is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and constitutes most of its territory.[10] Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Grosvenor Museum
Grosvenor Museum
Grosvenor Museum
is a museum in Chester, Cheshire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England
National Heritage List for England
as a designated Grade II listed building.[1] Its full title is The Grosvenor Museum of Natural History and Archaeology, with Schools of Science and Art, for Chester, Cheshire
Cheshire
and North Wales. It takes its name from the family name of the Dukes of Westminster, who are major landowners in Cheshire.[2] The museum opened in 1886, it was extended in 1894, and major refurbishments took place between 1989 and 1999
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Chester
Chester
Chester
(/ˈtʃɛstər/ CHEST-ər; Welsh: Caer
Caer
[ˈkai̯r]) is a walled city in Cheshire, England, on the River Dee, close to the border with Wales. With a population of 86,011 in 2011,[3] it is the most populous settlement of Cheshire
Cheshire
West and Chester, which had a population of 332,200 in 2014.[4] Chester
Chester
was granted city status in 1541. Chester
Chester
was founded as a "castrum" or Roman fort with the name Deva Victrix in the reign of the Emperor Vespasian
Emperor Vespasian
in 79 AD. One of the main army camps in Roman Britain, Deva later became a major civilian settlement. In 689, King Æthelred of Mercia
Æthelred of Mercia
founded the Minster Church of West Mercia, which later became Chester's first cathedral, and the Saxons extended and strengthened the walls to protect the city against the Danes
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Suessiones
The Suessiones
Suessiones
were a Belgic
Belgic
tribe of western Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
in the 1st century BC, inhabiting the region between the Oise and the Marne, around the present-day city of Soissons
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Canovium
Canovium
Canovium
was a fort in the Roman province
Roman province
of Britannia. Its site is located at Caerhun
Caerhun
in the Conwy
Conwy
valley, in the county borough of Conwy, in North Wales.Contents1 Early history 2 Later history 3 Academic studies 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarly history[edit] Canovium
Canovium
was a square fort built in timber at an important river crossing (at Tal-y-Cafn) by the Roman army around AD 75, possibly to house a 500-strong regiment of foot-soldiers. Rebuilding in stone began in the early 2nd century. It contained the usual headquarters building, commanding officer's house, granaries and barrack blocks, but the two former buildings were unusually large for the size of the fort. There was a bath-house to the east and an extensive vicus to the north
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Clwydian Range
The Clwydian Range
Clwydian Range
(Welsh: Bryniau Clwyd) is a series of hills and mountains in north east Wales
Wales
that runs from Llandegla
Llandegla
in the south to Prestatyn
Prestatyn
in the north, with the highest point being the popular Moel Famau. The range is designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Denbighshire
Denbighshire
Denbighshire
(Welsh: Sir Ddinbych; [ˌsiːr ˈðɪnbɨ̞χ]) is a county in north-east Wales, named after the historic county of Denbighshire, but with substantially different borders. Denbighshire is the longest known inhabited part of Wales. Pontnewydd (Bontnewydd-Llanelwy) Palaeolithic site has Neanderthal
Neanderthal
remains from 225,000 years ago. Its several castles include Denbigh, Rhuddlan, Ruthin, Castell Dinas Bran
Castell Dinas Bran
and Bodelwyddan. St Asaph, one of the smallest cities in Britain, has one of the smallest Anglican cathedrals. Denbighshire
Denbighshire
has a length of coast to the north and hill ranges to the east, south and west. In the central part, the River Clwyd
Clwyd
has created a broad fertile valley. It is primarily a rural county with little industry
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Roman Invasion Of Britain
The Roman conquest of Britain
Roman conquest of Britain
was a gradual process, beginning effectively in AD 43 under Emperor Claudius, whose general Aulus Plautius served as first governor of Roman Britain
Rom

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Publius Ostorius Scapula
Publius Ostorius Scapula (died 52) was a Roman statesman and general who governed Britain from 47 until his death, and was responsible for the defeat and capture of Caratacus.Contents1 Career 2 Notes 3 References3.1 Primary sources 3.2 Secondary sources4 External linksCareer[edit] Publius Ostorius Scapula was probably the son of Quintus Ostorius Scapula, the first joint commander of the Praetorian Guard
Praetorian Guard
appointed by Augustus
Augustus
and later prefect of Egypt.[1] Nothing is known of his early career. He was suffect consul, probably in 46. In the winter of 47 he was appointed the second governor of Roman Britain
Roman Britain
by the emperor Claudius, succeeding Aulus Plautius. The south and east of the island was securely occupied and alliances had been made with tribes outside the Roman-controlled area, but other tribes continued to resist
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Iceni
The Iceni
Iceni
/aɪˈsiːnaɪ/ or Eceni were a Brittonic tribe of eastern Britain during the Iron Age and early Roman era. Their territory included present-day Norfolk
Norfolk
and parts of Suffolk
Suffolk
and Cambridgeshire, and bordered the area of the Corieltauvi
Corieltauvi
to the west, and the Catuvellauni
Catuvellauni
and Trinovantes
Trinovantes
to the south. In the Roman period, their capital was Venta Icenorum
Venta Icenorum
at modern-day Caistor St Edmund.[1][2] Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
does not mention the Iceni
Iceni
in his account of his invasions of Britain in 55 and 54 BC, though they may be related to the Cenimagni, who Caesar notes as living north of the River Thames
River Thames
at that time
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Demetae
The Demetae
Demetae
were a Celtic people of Iron Age Britain who inhabited modern Pembrokeshire
Pembrokeshire
and Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire
in south-west Wales, and gave their name to the county of Dyfed. Classical references[edit] They are mentioned in Ptolemy's Geographia, as being west of the Silures
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