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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
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House Of Commons Of The United Kingdom
The House of Commons
House of Commons
is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Offices however extend to Portcullis House
Portcullis House
due to shortage of space. The Commons is an elected body consisting of 650 members known as Members of Parliament (MPs). Members are elected to represent constituencies by first-past-the-post and hold their seats until Parliament is dissolved. The House of Commons
House of Commons
of England
England
evolved in the 13th and 14th centuries
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Select Committee
A select committee is a committee made up of a small number of parliamentary members appointed to deal with particular areas or issues originating in the Westminster system
Westminster system
of parliamentary democracy. Select committees exist in the British Parliament, as well as in other parliaments based on the Westminster model, such as those in Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, India
India
and New Zealand. It is a special subcommittee of a legislature or assembly governed under a committee system, like Robert's Rules of Order
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Allies Of World War I
The Allies of World War I, or Entente Powers, were the countries that opposed the Central Powers
Central Powers
in the First World War. The members of the original Triple Entente
Triple Entente
of 1907 were the French Republic, the British Empire
British Empire
and the Russian Empire. Italy
Italy
ended its alliance with the Central Powers, arguing that Germany and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
started the war without prior consultation with all allies and that the alliance was only defensive in nature; it entered the war on the side of the Entente in 1915. Japan
Japan
was another important member
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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Roman Timekeeping
The Roman clock, or time of day, was divided into 24 hours (Latin horae), 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness. [1]Contents1 Seasonal change in the hourly length of daytime 2 Local timekeeping across the Roman Empire 3 Beginning of the Roman day 4 Watches of the night 5 Time keeping devices 6 Modern remnants 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksSeasonal change in the hourly length of daytime[edit] Since the daytime duration varied with the seasons, this also meant that the length of the hour changed, with shorter hours in winter and longer hours in summer.[1] The Romans also understood that the length of daytime depended on latitude
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Terce
Terce, or Third Hour, is a fixed time of prayer of the Divine Office in almost all the Christian
Christian
liturgies. It consists mainly of psalms and is said at 9 a.m. Its name comes from Latin
Latin
and refers to the third hour of the day after dawn.Contents1 Origin 2 Development 3 Symbolism 4 Armenian Liturgy 5 Eastern Christian
Christian
Office 6 Notes 7 See alsoOrigin[edit] The origin of Terce, like that of Sext and None, to which it bears a close relationship, dates back to Apostolic times. According to an ancient custom of the Romans and Greeks, the day and night respectively were divided into four parts of about three hours each. The second division of the day contained the hours from about the modern nine o'clock until about midday;[1] using the Roman numbering the hour just preceding this division was called hora tertia (the third hour) from which the word terce is derived
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Daylight Saving (play)
Daylight Saving is a comedy by Nick Enright about a married couple living in north Sydney
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Mount Athos
Mount Athos
Mount Athos
(/ˈæθɒs/; Greek: Άθως, Áthos, [ˈaθos]) is a mountain and peninsula in northeastern Greece
Greece
and an important centre of Eastern Orthodox monasticism. It is governed as an autonomous polity within the Greek Republic. Mount Athos
Mount Athos
is home to 20 monasteries under the direct jurisdiction of the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople. Mount Athos
Mount Athos
is commonly referred to in Greek as the "Holy Mountain" (Ἅγιον Ὄρος) and the entity as the "Athonite State" (Αθωνική Πολιτεία, Athoniki Politia). Other languages of Orthodox tradition also use names translating to "Holy Mountain" (e.g. Bulgarian and Serbian Света гора, Russian Святая гора, Georgian მთაწმინდა)
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Iceland
Iceland
Iceland
(/ˈaɪslənd/ ( listen); Icelandic: Ísland, pronounced [ˈistlant])[7] is a Nordic island country in the North Atlantic, with a population of 348,580 and an area of 103,000 km2 (40,000 sq mi), making it the most sparsely populated country in Europe.[8] The capital and largest city is Reykjavík. Reykjavík
Reykjavík
and the surrounding areas in the southwest of the country are home to over two-thirds of the population. Iceland
Iceland
is volcanically and geologically active. The interior consists of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains, and glaciers, while many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland
Iceland
is warmed by the Gulf Stream
Gulf Stream
and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic
Arctic
Circle
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Jewish Prayer
Jewish prayer
Jewish prayer
(Hebrew: תְּפִלָּה‬, tefillah [tefiˈla]; plural Hebrew: תְּפִלּוֹת‬, tefillot [tefiˈlot]; Yiddish תּפֿלה tfile [ˈtfɪlə], plural תּפֿלות tfilles [ˈtfɪləs]; Yinglish: davening /ˈdɑːvənɪŋ/ from Yiddish דאַוון daven ‘pray’) are the prayer recitations and Jewish meditation traditions that form part of the observance of Rabbinic Judaism. These prayers, often with instructions and commentary, are found in the siddur, the traditional Jewish prayer
Jewish prayer
book
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Window Shutter
A window shutter is a solid and stable window covering usually consisting of a frame of vertical stiles and horizontal rails (top, centre and bottom). Set within this frame can be louvers (both operable or fixed, horizontal or vertical), solid panels, fabric, glass and most any other item that can be mounted within a frame. Shutters may be employed for a variety of reasons, including controlling the amount of sunlight that enters a room, to provide privacy, security, to protect against weather or unwanted intrusion or damage and to enhance the aesthetics of a building. Depending on the application, and the construction of the window frame, shutters can be mounted to fit within the opening or to overlap the opening. The term window shutter includes both interior shutters, used on the inside of a house or building, and exterior shutters, used on the outside of a structure
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Entomology
Entomology
Entomology
(from Ancient Greek ἔντομον (entomon), meaning 'insect', and -λογία (-logia), meaning 'study of'[1]) is the scientific study of insects, a branch of zoology. In the past the term "insect" was more vague, and historically the definition of entomology included the study of terrestrial animals in other arthropod groups or other phyla, such as arachnids, myriapods, earthworms, land snails, and slugs. This wider meaning may still be encountered in informal use. Like several of the other fields that are categorized within zoology, entomology is a taxon-based category; any form of scientific study in which there is a focus on insect-related inquiries is, by definition, entomology
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Shift-work
Shift work
Shift work
is an employment practice designed to make use of, or provide service across, all 24 hours of the clock each day of the week (often abbreviated as 24/7). The practice typically sees the day divided into shifts, set periods of time during which different groups of workers perform their duties
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Liberal Party (UK)
The Liberal Party was one of the two major parties in the United Kingdom—with the opposing Conservative Party—in the nineteenth and early twentieth century.[2] The party arose from an alliance of Whigs and free trade Peelites and Radicals favourable to the ideals of the American and French Revolutions in the 1850s. By the end of the nineteenth century, it had formed four governments under William Gladstone. Despite being divided over the issue of Irish Home Rule, the party returned to government in 1906 with a landslide victory. It passed the welfare reforms that created a basic British welfare state. Liberal H. H. Asquith
H. H. Asquith
was Prime Minister from 1908 to 1916, followed by David Lloyd George
David Lloyd George
from 1916 to 1922
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