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David Gauke
David Michael Gauke MP (/ɡɔːk/; born 8 October 1971), a British Conservative Party politician and a solicitor, is the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain. He has been the MP for South West Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
since 2005. He was appointed as the Secretary of State for Justice, and simultaneously as Lord Chancellor, in January 2018.[1]Contents1 Early life and career 2 Parliamentary career2.1 Expenses3 Personal life 4 References 5 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Gauke was educated at Northgate High School in Ipswich, Suffolk
Suffolk
before attending St Edmund Hall, Oxford
St Edmund Hall, Oxford
where he was awarded a Bachelor of Arts degree in law in 1993, and the College of Law
Law
in Chester
Chester
where he graduated in legal practice in 1995. In 1993, he was a researcher for Barry Legg, the Conservative MP for Milton Keynes South West
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The Right Honourable
The Right Honourable (The Rt Hon. or Rt Hon.) is an honorific style traditionally applied to certain persons and to certain collective bodies in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, India, some other Commonwealth realms, the Anglophone Caribbean, Mauritius, and occasionally elsewhere
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Bachelor Of Arts
A Bachelor of Arts (BA or AB, from the Latin
Latin
baccalaureus artium or artium baccalaureus) is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors
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Ipswich
Ipswich
Ipswich
(/ˈɪpswɪtʃ/ ( listen)) is the county town of Suffolk, England, located on the estuary of the River Orwell, about 60 miles (97 km) north east of London. The town has been continuously occupied since the Saxon period,[1] and its port has been one of England's most important for the whole of its history.[2] Ipswich
Ipswich
is a non-metropolitan district
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Conservative Party (UK)
The Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party,[11] is a centre-right political party in the United Kingdom. It is currently the governing party, having been so since the 2010 general election, where a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats was formed. In 2015, the Conservatives led by David Cameron won a surprise majority and formed the first Conservative majority government since 1992.[12] However, the 2017 snap election on Thursday 8 June resulted in a hung parliament, and the party lost its parliamentary majority.[13] It is reliant on the support of a Northern Irish political party, the Democratic Unionist Party
Democratic Unionist Party
(DUP), in order to command a majority in the House of Commons through a confidence-and-supply deal. The party leader, Theresa May,[14] has served as both Leader of the Conservative Party and Prime Minister since 13 July 2016
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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St Edmund Hall, Oxford
St Edmund Hall (sometimes known as The Hall or affectionately as Teddy Hall) is a constituent college of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
in England. The college has a claim to be "the oldest academical society for the education of undergraduates in any university" and is the last surviving medieval hall at the University.[3] The college is located just off Queen's Lane, near the High Street, in central Oxford. As of 2016, the college had a financial endowment of roughly £42 million.[4]Contents1 History 2 Buildings and grounds2.1 Entrance 2.2
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University Of Law
The University of Law
University of Law
(ULaw) (formerly the College of Law) is a for-profit, private university in the United Kingdom, providing law degrees, specialist legal training, and continuing professional development courses for British barristers and solicitors. Founded in 1962 as the College of Law, it is the UK's largest law school.[1] The College of Law was granted degree-awarding powers in 2006, and in 2012 it became the UK's first for-profit educational institution to be granted university status.[2][3][4] ULaw has eight branches across England. The College of Law had been incorporated by royal charter as a charity in 1975, but in 2012, prior to the granting of university status, its educational and training business was split off and incorporated as a private limited company.[5] This became the College of Law Ltd and later University of Law
University of Law
Ltd
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Politician
A politician is a person active in party politics, or a person holding or seeking office in government. In democratic countries, politicians seek elective positions within a government through elections or, at times, temporary appointment to replace politicians who have died, resigned or have been otherwise removed from office. In non-democratic countries, they employ other means of reaching power through appointment, bribery, revolutions and intrigues. Some politicians are experienced in the art or science of government.[1] Politicians propose, support and create laws or policies that govern the land and, by extension, its people
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Solicitor
A solicitor is a legal practitioner who traditionally deals with most of the legal matters in some jurisdictions. A person must have legally-defined qualifications, which vary from one jurisdiction to another, to be described as a solicitor and enabled to practise there as such. For example, in England and Wales
England and Wales
a solicitor is admitted to practise under the provisions of the Solicitors Act 1974. With some exceptions, practising solicitors must possess a practising certificate. There are many more solicitors than barristers in England; they undertake the general aspects of giving legal advice and conducting legal proceedings.[1] In the United Kingdom, a few Australian states, Hong Kong, South Africa (where they are called attorneys) and Ireland, the legal profession is split between solicitors and barristers (called advocates in some countries), and a lawyer will usually only hold one of the two titles
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Member Of Parliament
A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title
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Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
(/ˈsʌfək/) is an East Anglian county of historic origin in England. It has borders with Norfolk
Norfolk
to the north, Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the west and Essex
Essex
to the south. The North Sea
North Sea
lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.[2] The county is low-lying with very few hills, and is largely arable land with the wetlands of the Broads in the north
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Academic Degree
An academic degree is a qualification awarded to students upon successful completion of a course of study in higher education, normally at a college or university. These institutions commonly offer degrees at various levels, typically including bachelor's, master’s and doctorates, often alongside other academic certificates, and professional degrees. The most common undergraduate degree is the bachelor's degree, although in some countries lower qualifications are titled degrees (e.g
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Member Of Parliament (United Kingdom)
A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title
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Law
Law
Law
is a system of rules that are created and enforced through social or governmental institutions to regulate behavior.[2] Law
Law
is a system that regulates and ensures that individuals or a community adhere to the will of the state. State-enforced laws can be made by a collective legislature or by a single legislator, resulting in statutes, by the executive through decrees and regulations, or established by judges through precedent, normally in common law jurisdictions. Private individuals can create legally binding contracts, including arbitration agreements that may elect to accept alternative arbitration to the normal court process. The formation of laws themselves may be influenced by a constitution, written or tacit, and the rights encoded therein
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Chester
Chester
Chester
(/ˈtʃɛstər/ CHEST-ər; Welsh: Caer
Caer
[ˈkai̯r]) is a walled city in Cheshire, England, on the River Dee, close to the border with Wales. With a population of 86,011 in 2011,[3] it is the most populous settlement of Cheshire
Cheshire
West and Chester, which had a population of 332,200 in 2014.[4] Chester
Chester
was granted city status in 1541. Chester
Chester
was founded as a "castrum" or Roman fort with the name Deva Victrix in the reign of the Emperor Vespasian
Emperor Vespasian
in 79 AD. One of the main army camps in Roman Britain, Deva later became a major civilian settlement. In 689, King Æthelred of Mercia
Æthelred of Mercia
founded the Minster Church of West Mercia, which later became Chester's first cathedral, and the Saxons extended and strengthened the walls to protect the city against the Danes
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