HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

David Bar-Hayim
David Bar-Hayim
David Bar-Hayim
(Hebrew: דוד חנוך יצחק ב"ר חיים‬, born David Mandel on February 24, 1960) is an Israeli Orthodox rabbi who heads the Shilo Institute (Machon Shilo), a Jerusalem-based rabbinical court and institute of Jewish education dedicated to the Torah of Israel.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Rabbinic career 3 Halachic rulings and positions 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] David Bar-Hayim
David Bar-Hayim
was born in Sydney, Australia. After moving to Israel in 1977, he initially studied in Yeshivat HaKotel, and subsequently in Merkaz Harav Kook
Merkaz Harav Kook
in Jerusalem
[...More...]

picture info

Sydney
Sydney
Sydney
(/ˈsɪdni/ ( listen))[7] is the state capital of New South Wales
Wales
and the most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[8] Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds the world's largest natural harbour and sprawls about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north and Macarthur to the south.[9] Sydney
Sydney
is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions
[...More...]

picture info

Sukkot
Sukkot
Sukkot
(Hebrew: סוכות‎ or סֻכּוֹת, sukkōt, commonly translated as Feast of Tabernacles or Feast of the Ingathering, traditional Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi
pronunciation Sukkos or Succos, literally Feast of Booths) is a biblical Jewish holiday
Jewish holiday
celebrated on the 15th day of the seventh month, Tishrei
Tishrei
(varies from late September to late October). During the existence of the Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Temple, it was one of the Three Pilgrimage Festivals (Hebrew: שלוש רגלים‎, shalosh regalim) on which the Israelites
Israelites
were commanded to perform a pilgrimage to the Temple. Sukkot
Sukkot
has a double significance
[...More...]

picture info

Babylon
Babylon
Babylon
(𒆍𒀭𒊏𒆠KAN4.DIĜIR.RAKI Akkadian: Bābili(m); Aramaic: בבל, Babel; Arabic: بَابِل‎, Bābil; Hebrew: בָּבֶל‎, Bavel; Classical Syriac: ܒܒܠ‎, Bāwēl) was a key kingdom in ancient Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the 18th to 6th centuries BC. The city was built on the Euphrates
Euphrates
river and divided in equal parts along its left and right banks, with steep embankments to contain the river's seasonal floods
[...More...]

picture info

Europe
Europe
Europe
(Europa) is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic Ocean
Arctic Ocean
to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, Asia
Asia
to the east, and the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered to be separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[7] Although the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has been redefined several times since its first conception in classical antiquity
[...More...]

Gentile
Gentile (from Latin gentilis, by the French gentil, feminine: gentille, meaning of or belonging to a clan or a tribe) is an ethnonym that commonly means non-Jew.[1] Other groups that claim Israelite heritage sometimes use the term to describe outsiders.[2] The term is used by English translators for the Hebrew גוי‬ (goy) and נכרי‬ (nokhri) in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
and the Greek word ἔθνη (éthnē) in the New Testament. The term "gentiles" is derived from Latin, used for contextual translation, and not an original Hebrew or Greek word from the Bible. The original words goy and ethnos refer to "peoples" or "nations" and are applied to both Israelites
Israelites
and non- Israelites
Israelites
in the Bible.[3] However, in most biblical uses, it denotes nations that are politically distinct from Israel
[...More...]

picture info

Noahidism
Noahidism
Noahidism
(/ˈnoʊə.haɪd.ɪsm/) or Noachidism (/ˈnoʊə.xaɪd.ɪsm/) is a monotheistic ideology based on the Seven Laws of Noah, and on their traditional interpretations within Rabbinic Judaism. According to Jewish law, non- Jews
Jews
are not obligated to convert to Judaism, but they are required to observe the Seven Laws of Noah to be assured of a place in the World to Come (Olam Haba), the final reward of the righteous.[1][2] The divinely ordained penalty for violating any of these Noahide Laws is discussed in the Talmud, but in practical terms that is subject to the working legal system that is established by the society at large. Those who subscribe to the observance of these commandments are referred to as Bene Noach (B'nei Noah) (Hebrew: בני נח‬), Children of Noah, Noahides (/ˈnoʊ.ə.haɪdɪs/), or Noahites (/ˈnoʊ.ə.haɪtɪs/)
[...More...]

picture info

Legume
A legume (/ˈlɛɡjuːm/ or /ˌləˈɡjuːm/) is a plant or its fruit or seed in the family Fabaceae
Fabaceae
(or Leguminosae). Legumes are grown agriculturally, primarily for their grain seed called pulse, for livestock forage and silage, and as soil-enhancing green manure. Well-known legumes include alfalfa, clover, peas, beans, chickpeas, lentils, lupin bean, mesquite, carob, soybeans, peanuts and tamarind. Fabaceae
Fabaceae
is the most common family found in tropical rainforests and in dry forests in the Americas
Americas
and Africa.[1] A legume fruit is a simple dry fruit that develops from a simple carpel and usually dehisces (opens along a seam) on two sides
[...More...]

picture info

Passover
Passover
Passover
or Pesach (/ˈpɛsɑːx, ˈpeɪsɑːx/;[4] from Hebrew פֶּסַח‬ Pesah, Pesakh) is a major, biblically derived Jewish holiday. Jews
Jews
celebrate Passover
Passover
as a commemoration of their liberation by God from slavery in ancient Egypt and their freedom as a nation under the leadership of Moses
[...More...]

picture info

Sefardi Jews
Sephardi Jews, also known as Sephardic
Sephardic
Jews
Jews
or Sephardim (Hebrew: סְפָרַדִּים‬, Modern Hebrew: Sfaraddim, Tiberian: Səp̄āraddîm; also יְהוּדֵי סְפָרַד‬ Y'hudey Spharad, lit. "The Jews
Jews
of Spain"), are a Jewish ethnic division whose ethnogenesis and emergence as a distinct community of Jews
Jews
coalesced during the early Middle Ages on the Iberian Peninsula
[...More...]

picture info

Ovadia Yosef
Ovadia Yosef
Ovadia Yosef
(Hebrew: עובדיה יוסף‬ Ovadya Yosef, Arabic: عبد الله يوسف‎, translit. Abdullah Yusuf; [2] September 24, 1920 – October 7, 2013)[3] was an Iraqi-born Talmudic scholar, a posek, the Sephardi
Sephardi
Chief Rabbi
Rabbi
of Israel
Israel
from 1973 to 1983, and the founder and long-time spiritual leader of Israel's ultra-Orthodox Shas
Shas
party.[4][5] Yosef's responsa were highly regarded within Haredi
Haredi
circles, particularly among Mizrahi
Mizrahi
communities, among whom he was regarded as "the most important living halakhic authority".[6] On occasion, Yosef made statements relating to various groups and individuals which were deemed controversial by his critics
[...More...]

picture info

Shabbat
Shabbat
Shabbat
(/ʃəˈbɑːt/; Hebrew: שַׁבָּת‎ [ʃa'bat], "rest" or "cessation") or Shabbos (['ʃa.bəs], Yiddish: שבת‎) or the Sabbath
Sabbath
is Judaism's day of rest and seventh day of the week, on which religious Jews, Samaritans and certain Christians (such as Seventh-day Adventists and Seventh Day Baptists) remember the Biblical creation of the heavens and the earth in six days and the Exodus of the Hebrews, and look forward to a future Messianic Age. Shabbat
Shabbat
observance entails refraining from work activities, often with great rigor, and engaging in restful activities to honor the day. Judaism's traditional position is that unbroken seventh-day Shabbat
Shabbat
originated among the Jewish people, as their first and most sacred institution, though some suggest other origins
[...More...]

picture info

Jewish Philosophy
Jewish philosophy
Jewish philosophy
(Hebrew: פילוסופיה יהודית‎) includes all philosophy carried out by Jews, or in relation to the religion of Judaism
[...More...]

picture info

Mishna
—— Tannaitic ——Mishnah Tosefta—— Amoraic (Gemara) ——Jerusalem Talmud Babylonian Talmud—— Later ——Minor TractatesHalakhic Midrash—— Exodus ——Mekhilta of Rabbi
Rabbi
Ishmael Mekhilta of Rabbi Shimon
[...More...]

picture info

Lulav
Lulav
Lulav
([lu'lav]; Hebrew: לולב‎) is a closed frond of the date palm tree. It is one of the Four Species
Four Species
used during the Jewish holiday of Sukkot. The other Species are the hadass (myrtle), aravah (willow), and etrog (citron)
[...More...]

picture info

Shulchan Aruch
The Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
(Hebrew: שֻׁלְחָן עָרוּך‬ [ʃulˈħan ʕaˈʁuχ], literally: "Set Table"),[1] also known by various Jewish communities but not all as "the Code of Jewish Law," is the most widely consulted of the various legal codes in Judaism
[...More...]