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Data Stream Interface
The Data Stream Interface (DSI) is a session layer used to carry Apple Filing Protocol traffic over Transmission Control Protocol.Contents1 Overview 2 Protocol2.1 Packet structure 2.2 Commands 2.3 Requests and replies 2.4 Session creation, maintenance and teardown 2.5 Getting server information with GetStatus 2.6 Error codes3 Further research 4 Footnotes 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] When Apple introduced TCP with MacTCP and Open Transport in System 7 in the 1990s, they needed their file sharing protocol (AFP) to run on both TCP and AppleTalk. They introduced AppleTalk
AppleTalk
Session Protocol (ASP) and DSI for TCP coincidentally with AFP 2.x. DSI is implemented directly into AFP clients such as in Mac OS and afpfs-ng. Protocol[edit] DSI is spoken between a client and an AFP server
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Transmission Control Protocol
The Transmission Control Protocol
Transmission Control Protocol
(TCP) is one of the main protocols of the Internet protocol suite. It originated in the initial network implementation in which it complemented the Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP). Therefore, the entire suite is commonly referred to as TCP/IP. TCP provides reliable, ordered, and error-checked delivery of a stream of octets (bytes) between applications running on hosts communicating by an IP network
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MacTCP
MacTCP was the standard TCP/IP
TCP/IP
implementation for the classic Mac OS through version 7.5.1. It was the first application-independent implementation of a TCP stack for a non- Unix
Unix
platform[1][2] and predates Winsock by over 5 years. Released in 1988, it is considered obsolete and has reliability issues and incomplete features that sometimes prevent it from operating properly on the modern Internet. In addition, the API was unique to the Mac OS, and at least one developer released a Berkeley Sockets-derived API to make porting from other platforms easier. It was originally a substantial purchase, carrying a $2,500 price tag for a site license, with an additional $2,500 fee for commercial use. The price was lowered until by the mid-1990s it sold for $60
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Open Transport
Open Transport was the name given by Apple Inc.
Apple Inc.
to its implementation of the Unix-originated System V
System V
STREAMS
STREAMS
networking stack. Based on code licensed from Mentat's Portable Streams product, Open Transport was built to provide the classic Mac OS with a modern TCP/IP implementation, replacing MacTCP. Apple also added its own implementation of AppleTalk
AppleTalk
to the stack to support legacy networks.[1]Contents1 History1.1 STREAMS 1.2 OT2 ReferencesHistory[edit] STREAMS[edit] Prior to the release of Open Transport, the classic Mac OS used a variety of stand-alone INITs to provide networking functionality. The only one that was widely used throughout the OS was the AppleTalk system
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System 7
System 7
System 7
(codenamed "Big Bang" and sometimes retrospectively called Mac OS 7) is a graphical user interface-based operating system for Macintosh
Macintosh
computers and is part of the classic Mac OS series of operating systems. It was introduced on May 13, 1991, by Apple Computer, Inc.[1] It succeeded System 6, and was the main Macintosh operating system until it was succeeded by Mac OS 8
Mac OS 8
in 1997. Features added with the System 7
System 7
release included virtual memory, personal file sharing, QuickTime, QuickDraw 3D, and an improved user interface. "System 7" is often used generically to refer to all 7.x versions. With the release of version 7.6 in 1997, Apple officially renamed the operating system "Mac OS", a name which had first appeared on System 7.5.1's boot screen
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Apple Filing Protocol
The Apple Filing Protocol (AFP), formerly AppleTalk
AppleTalk
Filing Protocol, is a proprietary network protocol, and part of the Apple File Service (AFS), that offers file services for macOS and the classic Mac OS. In macOS, AFP is one of several file services supported, with others including Server Message Block (SMB), Network File System
Network File System
(NFS), File Transfer Protocol (FTP), and WebDAV. AFP currently supports Unicode file names, POSIX and access control list permissions, resource forks, named extended attributes, and advanced file locking
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Data Stream Interface
The Data Stream Interface (DSI) is a session layer used to carry Apple Filing Protocol traffic over Transmission Control Protocol.Contents1 Overview 2 Protocol2.1 Packet structure 2.2 Commands 2.3 Requests and replies 2.4 Session creation, maintenance and teardown 2.5 Getting server information with GetStatus 2.6 Error codes3 Further research 4 Footnotes 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] When Apple introduced TCP with MacTCP and Open Transport in System 7 in the 1990s, they needed their file sharing protocol (AFP) to run on both TCP and AppleTalk. They introduced AppleTalk
AppleTalk
Session Protocol (ASP) and DSI for TCP coincidentally with AFP 2.x. DSI is implemented directly into AFP clients such as in Mac OS and afpfs-ng. Protocol[edit] DSI is spoken between a client and an AFP server
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