HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Darrelle Revis
Darrelle Shavar Revis (born July 14, 1985) is an American football cornerback who is a free agent. He played college football for the University of Pittsburgh
University of Pittsburgh
and was drafted in the first round (14th overall) by the New York Jets
New York Jets
in the 2007 NFL Draft. He has also played for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, New England Patriots, and Kansas City Chiefs. In his lone season with the Patriots he won Super Bowl XLIX. His spot on the field is nicknamed "Revis Island," a phrase Revis has trademarked,[1] for his ability to shut down the opposing number one receiver
[...More...]

picture info

Cornerback
A cornerback (CB), also referred to as a corner, is a member of the defensive backfield or secondary in American and Canadian football.[1] Cornerbacks cover receivers, to defend against pass offenses and make tackles. Other members of the defensive backfield include the safeties and occasionally linebackers. The cornerback position requires speed and agility. A cornerback's skillset typically requires proficiency in anticipating the quarterback, backpedaling, executing single and zone coverage, disrupting pass routes, block shedding, and tackling. Cornerbacks are among the fastest players on the field.Contents1 Overview 2 Zone coverage2.1 Cover 1 2.2 Cover 2 2.3 Cover 3 2.4 Cover 43 Jamming the receiver 4 Single/man-to-man coverage4.1 Loose man 4.2 Man up5 See also 6 ReferencesOverview[edit] The chief responsibility of the cornerback is to defend against the offense's pass
[...More...]

picture info

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
The Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
Post-Gazette, also known simply as the "PG", is the largest daily newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
[...More...]

picture info

Quarterback Sack
In American football
American football
and Canadian football, a sack occurs when the quarterback (or another offensive player acting as a passer) is tackled behind the line of scrimmage before he can throw a forward pass, when the quarterback is tackled behind the line of scrimmage in the "pocket" and his intent is unclear, or when a passer runs out of bounds behind the line of scrimmage due to defensive pressure.[1] This often occurs if the opposing team's defensive line, linebackers or defensive backs are able to apply pass pressure (also called a pass rush) to quickly get past blocking players of the offensive team (the quarterback's protection), or if the quarterback is unable to find a back to hand the ball off to or an available eligible receiver (including wide receivers, running backs and tight ends) to catch the ball, allowing the defense a longer opportunity to tackle the quarterback
[...More...]

picture info

Interception
In ball-playing competitive team sports, an interception or pick is a move by a player involving a pass of the ball—whether by foot or hand, depending on the rules of the sport—in which the ball is intended for a player of the same team but caught by a player of the opposing team, who thereby usually gains possession of the ball for their team
[...More...]

picture info

Fumbles
A fumble in American and Canadian football
Canadian football
occurs when a player who has possession and control of the ball loses it before being downed (tackled) or scoring. By rule, it is any act other than passing, kicking, punting, or successful handing that results in loss of player possession. A fumble may be forced by a defensive player who either grabs or punches the ball or butts the ball with his helmet (a move called "tackling the ball"). A fumbled ball may be recovered and advanced by either team (except, in American football, after the two-minute warning in either half or 4th down, when the fumbling player is the only offensive player allowed to advance the ball, otherwise the ball is ruled dead at the spot of recovery if the ball bounces backwards or spotted at the point of the fumble if the ball travels forward)
[...More...]

picture info

Passes Defended
In American football, a pass deflected, also known as a pass deflection,[1] a pass defended, a pass defensed, a pass knockdown, or a pass breakup, is an incomplete pass that is caused by a defensive player. This is done by slapping or blocking the ball with a hand or part of the arm, knocking the ball to the ground. References[edit]^ "Pass Deflection (football statistics)". Acronym Finder
[...More...]

picture info

Touchdowns
A touchdown is a means of scoring in both American and Canadian football. Whether running, passing, returning a kickoff or punt, or recovering a turnover, a team scores a touchdown by advancing the ball into the opponent's end zone.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] To score a touchdown, one team must take the football into the opposite end zone. The touchdown is scored the instant the ball crosses the plane of the goal line (that is, if any part of the ball is in the space on, above, or across the goal line) while in possession of a player whose team is trying to score in that end zone. The play is dead and the touchdown scores the moment the ball crosses the goal line in possession of a player, or the moment the ball comes into possession of an offensive player in the end zone (having established possession by controlling the ball and having both feet or another part of the body, excluding the hands, touch the ground)
[...More...]

picture info

American Football
American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada[citation needed] and also known as gridiron,[nb 1] is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal
[...More...]

picture info

College Football
College football
College football
is American football
American football
played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football
Canadian football
played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football
American football
rules first gained popularity in the United States. Unlike most other sports in North America, no minor league farm organizations exist in American or Canadian football. Therefore, college football is generally considered to be the second tier of American football
American football
in the United States and Canadian football
Canadian football
in Canada; one step ahead of high school competition, and one step below professional competition
[...More...]

picture info

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
The Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
Tribune-Review, also known as "the Trib," was the second largest daily printed newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the United States until it transitioned to an all-digital format on December 1, 2016
[...More...]

picture info

PIAA
The Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Interscholastic Athletic Association, Inc. (PIAA) is one of the governing bodies of high school and junior high school sports for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, United States. The PIAA main office is located in the Harrisburg
Harrisburg
suburb of Mechanicsburg.Contents1 History 2 Districts2.1 East vs
[...More...]

picture info

Big East Conference (1979–2013)
The Big East Conference
Big East Conference
was a collegiate athletics conference that consisted of as many as 16 universities in the eastern half of the United States from 1979 to 2013. The conference's members participated in 24 NCAA sports. The conference had a history of success at the national level in basketball throughout its history, while its shorter (1991 to 2013) football program, created by inviting one college and four other "associate members" (their football programs only) into the conference, resulted in two national championships. In basketball, Big East teams made 18 Final Four appearances and won seven NCAA Championships (UConn with three, Villanova, Georgetown, Syracuse, and Louisville with one each)
[...More...]

WPIAL
The Western Pennsylvania
Western Pennsylvania
Interscholastic Athletic League (WPIAL) is an interscholastic athletic association in Western Pennsylvania. It is District 7 of the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association.Contents1 History 2 Member schools 3 Sports3.1 Footall champions, 2016–present 3.2 Boys' basketball champions, 2000–present4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Western Pennsylvania
Western Pennsylvania
Interscholastic Athletic League (WPIAL) was founded in 1907 by a group of educators from four public and private Pittsburgh schools who sought increased regulation and governance of student athletic eligibility and interscholastic athletic competition. The founding schools in the league included Shady Side Academy, Allegheny Prep, Pittsburgh Fifth Avenue High School, and Pittsburgh Central High School. William R
[...More...]

picture info

Track & Field
Track and field
Track and field
is a sport which includes athletic contests established on the skills of running, jumping, and throwing.[1] The name is derived from the sport's typical venue: a stadium with an oval running track enclosing a grass field where the throwing and jumping events take place. Track and field
Track and field
is categorized under the umbrella sport of athletics, which also includes road running, cross country running, and race walking. The foot racing events, which include sprints, middle- and long-distance events, race walking and hurdling, are won by the athlete with the fastest time. The jumping and throwing events are won by the athlete who achieves the greatest distance or height. Regular jumping events include long jump, triple jump, high jump and pole vault, while the most common throwing events are shot put, javelin, discus and hammer
[...More...]

picture info

4 X 100 Metres Relay
The 4 × 100 metres relay or sprint relay is an athletics track event run in lanes over one lap of the track with four runners completing 100 metres each. The first runners must begin in the same stagger as for the individual 400 m race. A relay baton is carried by each runner. Prior to 2018, the baton had to be passed within a 20 m changeover box, preceded by a 10 metre acceleration zone. With a rule change effective November 1, 2017 that zone was modified to include the acceleration zone as part of the passing zone, making the entire zone 30 metres in length. The outgoing runner cannot touch the baton until it has entered the zone, the incoming runner cannot touch the baton after it has left the zone. The zone is usually marked in yellow, frequently using lines, triangles or chevrons. While the rule book specifies the exact positioning of the marks, the colors and style are only "recommended"
[...More...]

.