HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Dardanelles
Coordinates: 40°12′N 26°24′E / 40.2°N 26.4°E / 40.2; 26.4A map depicting the locations of the Turkish Straits, with the Bosphorus
Bosphorus
marked in red, and the Dardanelles
Dardanelles
in yellow. The sovereign national territory of Turkey
Turkey
is highlighted in green.Map showing the location of the Dardanelles
Dardanelles
(yellow) relative to the Bosphorus
Bosphorus
(red). Also depicted are the Sea of Marmara, the Aegean Sea, and the Black Sea.Satellite image of the Dardanelles, taken from the Landsat 7
Landsat 7
in September 2006. The body of water on the left is the Aegean Sea, while the one on the upper right is the Sea of Marmara. The Dardanelles
Dardanelles
is the tapered waterway running diagonally between the two seas, from the northeast to the southwest
[...More...]

"Dardanelles" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Golden Fleece
In Greek mythology, the Golden Fleece
Golden Fleece
(Greek: χρυσόμαλλον δέρας chrysómallon déras) is the fleece of the gold-haired[a] winged ram, which was held in Colchis.[1] The fleece is a symbol of authority and kingship. It figures in the tale of the hero Jason
Jason
and his crew of Argonauts, who set out on a quest for the fleece by order of King Pelias, in order to place Jason
Jason
rightfully on the throne of Iolcus
Iolcus
in Thessaly. Through the help of Medea, they acquire the Golden Fleece. The story is of great antiquity and was current in the time of Homer
Homer
(eighth century BC)
[...More...]

"Golden Fleece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Waterway
A waterway is any navigable body of water. Broad distinctions are useful to avoid ambiguity, and disambiguation will be of varying importance depending on the nuance of the equivalent word in other languages. A first distinction is necessary between maritime shipping routes and waterways used by inland water craft
[...More...]

"Waterway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Electra (Pleiad)
The Pleiad Electra (/ɪˈlɛktrə/; Greek: Ἠλέκτρα, Ēlektra "amber") of Greek mythology
Greek mythology
was one of the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione. Electra was the wife of Corythus, to whom she bore Iasion. She was seduced by Zeus
Zeus
and gave birth to Dardanus. According to one legend, she was the lost Pleiad, disappearing in grief after the destruction of Troy. She was called Atlantis by Ovid, personifying the family of Pleiades
[...More...]

"Electra (Pleiad)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Zeus
Zeus
Zeus
(/zjuːs/;[3] Greek: Ζεύς Zeús [zdeǔ̯s])[4] is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus. His name is cognate with the first element of his Roman equivalent Jupiter. His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical, to those of Indo-European deities such as Indra, Jupiter, Perkūnas, Perun, Thor, and Odin.[5][6][7] Zeus
Zeus
is the child of Cronus
Cronus
and Rhea, the youngest of his siblings to be born, though sometimes reckoned the eldest as the others required disgorging from Cronus's stomach. In most traditions, he is married to Hera, by whom he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Hebe, and Hephaestus.[8] At the oracle of Dodona, his consort was said to be Dione, by whom the Iliad
Iliad
states that he fathered Aphrodite.[11] Zeus was also infamous for his erotic escapades
[...More...]

"Zeus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Eastern Mediterranean
The Eastern Mediterranean denotes the countries geographically to the east of the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
(Levantine Seabasin)
[...More...]

"Eastern Mediterranean" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hellespontine Phrygia
Hellespontine Phrygia
Phrygia
(Ancient Greek: Ἑλλησποντιακὴ Φρυγία, Hellēspontiakē Phrygia) or Lesser Phrygia
Phrygia
(μικρᾶ Φρυγία, mikra Phrygia) was a Persian satrapy (province) in northwestern Anatolia, directly southeast of the Hellespont.[1] Its capital was Dascylium, and for most of its existence it was ruled by the hereditary Persian Pharnacid dynasty.[2] Together with Greater Phrygia, it made up the administrative provinces of the Phrygia region.[3]Contents1 History 2 Persian satraps of Hellespontine Phrygia2.1 Alexandrian satraps3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksHistory[edit] The satrapy was created in the beginning of the fifth century BC, during the time of administrative reorganisations of the territories in western Asia Minor,[4] which were amongst the most important Achaemenid territories
[...More...]

"Hellespontine Phrygia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Balkans
The Balkans, or the Balkan Peninsula, is a geographic area in southeastern Europe
Europe
with various and disputed definitions.[1][2] The region takes its name from the Balkan Mountains
Balkan Mountains
that stretch from the Serbian-Bulgarian border to the Black Sea. The Balkan Peninsula
Peninsula
is bordered by the Adriatic Sea
Adriatic Sea
on the northwest, the Ionian Sea
Ionian Sea
on the southwest, the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
in the south and southeast, and the Black Sea
Black Sea
on the east and northeast. The northern border of the peninsula is variously defined
[...More...]

"Balkans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Near East
The Near East
Near East
is a geographical term that roughly encompasses Western Asia. Despite having varying definitions within different academic circles, the term was originally applied to the maximum extent of the Ottoman Empire
[...More...]

"Near East" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Strait
A strait is a naturally formed, narrow, typically navigable waterway that connects two larger bodies of water. Most commonly it is a channel of water that lies between two land masses. Some straits are not navigable, for example because they are too shallow, or because of an unnavigable reef or archipelago.Contents1 Terminology 2 Comparisons 3 Navigational (legal) regime 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTerminology[edit] The terms channel, pass or passage, can be synonymous and used interchangeably with strait, although each is sometimes differentiated with varying senses. In Scotland
Scotland
firth or kyle are also sometimes used as synonyms for strait. Many straits are economically important
[...More...]

"Strait" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Helle (mythology)
Helle (/ˈhɛli/; Greek: Ἕλλη), sometimes also called Athamantis (Ἀθαμαντίς), was a character in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
who figured prominently in the story of Jason
Jason
and the Argonauts. Mythology[edit] Phrixus, son of Athamas
Athamas
and Nephele, along with his twin sister, Helle, were hated by their stepmother, Ino. Ino hatched a devious plot to get rid of the twins, roasting all the town's crop seeds so they would not grow. The local farmers, frightened of famine, asked a nearby oracle for assistance. Ino bribed the men sent to the oracle to lie and tell the others that the oracle required the sacrifice of Phrixus. Before he was killed though, Phrixus
Phrixus
and Helle were rescued by a flying golden ram sent by Nephele, their natural mother
[...More...]

"Helle (mythology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Romanization Of Greek
Romanization
Romanization
of Greek is the transliteration (letter-mapping) or transcription (sound-mapping) of text from the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet
into the Latin
Latin
alphabet. The conventions for writing and romanizing Ancient Greek and Modern Greek
Modern Greek
differ markedly, which can create confusion. The sound of the English letter B (/b/) was written as β in ancient Greek but is now written as the digraph μπ, while the modern β sounds like the English letter V (/v/) instead. The Greek name Ἰωάννης became Johannes
Johannes
in Latin
Latin
and then John in English, but in Greek itself has instead become Γιάννης; this might be written as Yannis, Jani, Ioannis, Yiannis, or Giannis, but not Giannes or Giannēs as it would have been in ancient Greek
[...More...]

"Romanization Of Greek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Suez Canal
The Suez
Suez
Canal
Canal
(Arabic: قناة السويس‎ qanāt as-suwēs) is an artificial sea-level waterway in Egypt, connecting the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the Red Sea
Red Sea
through the Isthmus of Suez. Constructed by the Suez Canal Company
Suez Canal Company
between 1859 and 1869, it was officially opened on November 17, 1869. The canal offers watercraft a shorter journey between the North Atlantic
Atlantic
and northern Indian Oceans via the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
and Red seas by avoiding the South Atlantic
Atlantic
and southern Indian oceans, in turn reducing the journey by approximately 7,000 kilometres (4,300 mi)
[...More...]

"Suez Canal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Russia
Coordinates: 60°N 90°E / 60°N 90°E / 60; 90Russian Federation Росси́йская Федерaция (Russian) Rossiyskaya FederatsiyaFlagCoat of armsAnthem:  "Gosudarstvenny gimn Rossiyskoy Federatsii"  (transliteration) "State Anthem of the Russian Federation"Location of Russia
Russia
(green) Russian-administered Crimea
[...More...]

"Russia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Turkish Language
Turkey
Turkey
(official), Northern Cyprus
Northern Cyprus
(official), Cyprus
[...More...]

"Turkish Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.