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Daniel Squadron
Daniel Squadron
Daniel Squadron
(born November 9, 1979) is a former member of the New York State Senate for the 26th district. A Democrat, Squadron was elected a New York State Senator in 2008, and was a candidate in the 2013 race for New York Public Advocate.[1][2] In August 2017, he announced he would be resigning his Senate seat to work with entrepreneur Adam Pritzker
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Ponzi Scheme
A Ponzi scheme
Ponzi scheme
(/ˈpɒnzi/; also a Ponzi game)[1] is a fraudulent investment operation where the operator provides fabricated reports and generates returns for older investors through revenue paid by new investors, rather than from legitimate business activities or profit of financial trading. Operators of Ponzi schemes can be either individuals or corporations, and grab the attention of new investors by offering short-term returns that are either abnormally high or unusually consistent. Companies that engage in Ponzi schemes focus all of their energy into attracting new clients to make investments. Ponzi schemes rely on a constant flow of new investments to continue to provide returns to older investors
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Dean Skelos
Dean George Skelos (born February 16, 1948) is a former Republican politician and the former Majority Leader of the New York State Senate. Skelos represented District 9 in the State Senate, comprising the southwest region of Nassau County, from 1985 through 2015.[1] Skelos was convicted on federal corruption charges in 2015, and was sentenced to five years in prison in 2016.[2][3] The court permitted Skelos to remain free pending appeals, and in 2017 his conviction was overturned following the U.S. Supreme Court decision in McDonnell v. United States.[2] His retrial is set to begin in June 2018.[4] Skelos was the second Long Islander to hold the position of Majority Leader, following Ralph J
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Manhattan Borough President
A borough president is an elective office in each of the five boroughs of New York City. For most of the city's history, the office contained significant executive powers within each borough, and the five presidents also comprised a majority of the New York City
New York City
Board of Estimate, the upper house of the New York City
New York City
legislature. Since 1990, the borough presidents were stripped of a majority of their powers in the New York City
New York City
government and now generally serve as ceremonial leaders. Borough presidents advise the Mayor, comment on land-use items in their borough, advocate borough needs in the annual municipal budget process, appoint and chair community boards, and serve as ex officio members of various other boards and committees
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Scott Stringer
Scott M. Stringer[1] (born April 29, 1960) is the 44th and current New York City Comptroller and a New York Democratic politician who previously served as the 26th Borough President
Borough President
of Manhattan.[2] In 1983, he became a legislative assistant to Assemblyman, and future Congressman, Jerrold Nadler. During these years, he supported Democratic candidate Governor Mario Cuomo. In 1992, Stringer ran for Nadler's Assembly seat representing the Upper West Side
Upper West Side
when Nadler replaced deceased Congressman Ted Weiss. In 2001, Stringer ran a campaign for New York City
New York City
Public Advocate. In 2005, he entered the race to succeed C. Virginia Fields
C. Virginia Fields
as Manhattan Borough President
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Mayor Of New York City
The Mayor
Mayor
of the City of New York is head of the executive branch of New York City's government. The mayor's office administers all city services, public property, police and fire protection, most public agencies, and enforces all city, state and federal laws within New York City. The budget, overseen by the mayor's Office of Management and Budget, is the largest municipal budget in the United States
United States
at $82 billion a year.[1] The city employs 325,000 people, spends about $21 billion to educate more than 1.1 million students (the largest public school system in the United States), levies $27 billion in taxes, and receives $14 billion from the state and federal governments. The mayor's office is located in New York City
New York City
Hall; it has jurisdiction over all five boroughs of New York City: Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Staten Island
Staten Island
and Queens
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Michael Bloomberg
Michael Rubens Bloomberg[2] (born on February 14, 1942) is an American businessman, engineer, author, politician, and philanthropist. As of February 9, 2018, his net worth was estimated at $50.8 billion,[1] making him the 7th-richest person in the United States and the 10th richest person in the world. He has joined The Giving Pledge, whereby billionaires pledge to give away at least half of their wealth.[3] Bloomberg is the founder, CEO, and owner of Bloomberg L.P., a global financial services, mass media, and software company that bears his name, and is notable for its Bloomberg Terminal, a computer software system providing financial data widely used in the global financial services industry. He began his career at the securities brokerage Salomon Brothers, before forming his own company in 1981 and spending the next twenty years as its chairman and CEO
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Brooklyn Bridge Park
Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bridge Park is an 85-acre (34 ha) park on the Brooklyn side of the East River
East River
in New York City. Designed by landscape architecture firm Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, the park has revitalized 1.3-mile (2.1 km) of Brooklyn's post-industrial waterfront from Atlantic Avenue in the south, under the Brooklyn Heights Promenade and past the Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bridge, to Jay Street north of the Manhattan
Manhattan
Bridge.[1] The site includes Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Piers 1–6, the historic Fulton Ferry Landing, and the preexisting Empire–Fulton Ferry and Main Street Parks
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Governors Island
Governors Island
Governors Island
is a 172-acre (70 ha) island in New York Harbor, approximately 800 yards (732 m) from the southern tip of Manhattan Island
Manhattan Island
and separated from Brooklyn
Brooklyn
by Buttermilk Channel, approximately 400 yards (366 m). It is part of the borough of Manhattan
Manhattan
in New York City. The National Park Service
National Park Service
administers a small portion of the north of the island as the Governors Island National Monument, while the Trust for Governors Island
Governors Island
operates the remaining 150 acres, including 52 historic buildings
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New York City Housing Authority
The New York City
New York City
Housing Authority (NYCHA) provides housing for low- and moderate-income residents throughout the five boroughs of New York City. NYCHA also administers a citywide Section 8 Leased Housing Program in rental apartments. These communities are often referred to in popular culture as "projects", or "developments". These facilities commonly have large income disparities with their respective surrounding neighborhood or community. The New York City
New York City
Housing Authority's mission is to increase opportunities for low- and moderate-income New Yorkers by providing safe, affordable housing and facilitating access to social and community services
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Mitchell-Lama Housing Program
The Mitchell-Lama Housing Program
Mitchell-Lama Housing Program
is a non-subsidy governmental housing guarantee in the state of New York. It was sponsored by New York State Senator MacNeil Mitchell and Assemblyman Alfred Lama. It was signed into law in 1955 as The Limited-Profit Housing Companies Act (officially contained in the Private Housing Finance law, article II titled Limited-Profit Housing Companies and referring to not-for-profit corp., whereas article IV titled Limited Dividend Housing Companies refers to non-Mitchell-Lama affordable housing organized as business corp., partnerships or trusts from 1927 on). The program's publicly stated purpose was the development and building of affordable housing, both rental and co-operatively owned, for middle-income residents.[1] Under this program, local jurisdictions acquired property by eminent domain and provided it to developers to develop housing for low- and middle-income tenants
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New York State Assembly
Majority caucus (104)     Democratic (103)      Independence (1)Minority caucus (37)     Republican (37)Vacant (9)     Vacant (9)Length of term2 yearsAuthority Article III, New York ConstitutionSalary $79,500/year + per diemElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016 (150 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (150 seats)Redistricting Legislative ControlMeeting placeState Assembly Chamber New York State Capitol Albany, New YorkWebsiteNew York State AssemblyThe New York State Assembly
New York State Assembly
is the lower house of the New York State Legislature, the New York State Senate
New York State Senate
being the upper house. There are 150 seats in the Assembly, with each of the 150 Assembly districts having an average population of 128,652
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Anthony Weiner
Anthony David Weiner (/ˈwiːnər/;[3] born September 4, 1964) is an American former Democratic congressman who represented New York's 9th congressional district from January 1999 until June 2011. He won seven terms as a Democrat, never receiving less than 60% of the vote. Weiner resigned from Congress in June 2011 after an incident in which a lewd photo was sent to a woman via Twitter
Twitter
became public. On May 19, 2017, Weiner pled guilty to another sexting charge of transferring obscene material to a minor[4][5] and was sentenced to 21 months in prison and ordered to pay a $10,000 fine.[6] He was also required to register as a sex offender for the rest of his life.[7] A New York City
New York City
native, Weiner attended public schools and graduated from SUNY Plattsburgh in 1985 with a B.A. in political science
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Sheldon Silver
Sheldon "Shelly" Silver (born February 13, 1944) is a former lawyer and Democratic Party politician from New York City, who became the Speaker of the New York State Assembly in 1994 until his arrest on federal corruption charges in 2015
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New York City Public Advocate
The office of Public Advocate for the City of New York is a citywide elected position in New York City, which is first in line to succeed the Mayor. The office serves as a direct link between the electorate and city government, effectively acting as an ombudsman, or "watchdog," for New Yorkers.Contents1 History 2 Duties 3 List of Public Advocates 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The office was created in 1993, when the New York City
New York City
Council voted to rename the position of President of the City Council. Following the City Charter revision of 1989 which eliminated the powerful New York City Board of Estimate on which the President held a seat, the post was seen as largely ceremonial; its only notable responsibility was to cast the deciding vote in the City Council in the unlikely event of a tie
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Betsy Gotbaum
Elisabeth A. "Betsy" Gotbaum (née Flower; born June 11, 1938[1]) was the New York City
New York City
Public Advocate. She was elected as Public Advocate for New York City
New York City
in 2001, and reelected in 2005. She was the third woman elected to a citywide post in NYC history. The other two were Carol Bellamy, who served as City Council President from 1978-1985, and Elizabeth Holtzman, who served as Comptroller from 1990-1993. She is a Democrat.Contents1 Early life 2 Political career 3 2001 Race for Public Advocate 4 2005 Race for Public Advocate 5 2009 Race for Public Advocate 6 2010 Appearance in The Lottery docudrama 7 Personal life7.1 2001 NYC Democratic Ticket 7.2 2005 NYC Democratic Ticket8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Elisabeth "Betsy" Flower attended The Brearley School[2] and graduated from the Masters School in Dobbs Ferry in 1956
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