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Daniel Solander
Daniel Carlsson Solander or Daniel Charles Solander (19 February 1733 – 13 May 1782) was a Swedish naturalist and an Apostle of Carl Linnaeus.[1] Solander was the first university educated scientist to set foot on Australian soil.Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksBiography[edit] Solander was born in Piteå, Norrbotten, Sweden, to Rev. Carl Solander[1] a Lutheran principal, and Magdalena née Bostadia.[1] Solander enrolled at Uppsala University
Uppsala University
in July 1750 and initially studied languages, the humanities and law. The professor of botany was the celebrated Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
who was soon impressed by young Solander's ability and accordingly persuaded his father to let him study natural history. Solander traveled to England
England
in June 1760 to promote the new Linnean system of classification
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Australian Dictionary Of Biography
The Australian Dictionary of Biography
Biography
(ADB or AuDB) is a national co-operative enterprise founded and maintained by the Australian National University (ANU) to produce authoritative biographical articles on eminent people in Australia's history. Initially published in a series of twelve hard-copy volumes between 1966 and 2005, the dictionary has been published online since 2006. The ADB project has been operating since 1957. Staff are located at the National Centre of Biography
Biography
in the History Department of the Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University
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Cleantech
Clean technology refers to any process, product, or service that reduces negative environmental impacts through significant energy efficiency improvements, the sustainable use of resources, or environmental protection activities. Clean technology includes a broad range of technology related to recycling, renewable energy (wind power, solar power, biomass, hydropower, biofuels, etc.), information technology, green transportation, electric motors, green chemistry, lighting, Greywater, and more. Environmental finance is a method by which new clean technology projects that have proven that they are "additional" or "beyond business as usual" can obtain financing through the generation of carbon credits
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Orkney Islands
Orkney
Orkney
/ˈɔːrkni/ (Old Norse: Orkneyjar, Pictish: Insi Orc, "islands of the pigs"), also known as the Orkney
Orkney
Islands,[Notes 1] is an archipelago in the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
of Scotland, situated off the north coast of Great Britain. Orkney
Orkney
is 16 kilometres (10 mi) north of the coast of Caithness
Caithness
and comprises approximately 70 islands, of which 20 are inhabited.[2][3][4] The largest island, Mainland, is often referred to as "the Mainland"
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Hebrides
The Hebrides
Hebrides
(/ˈhɛbrɪdiːz/; Scottish Gaelic: Innse Gall, pronounced [ĩːʃə gau̯l̪ˠ]; Old Norse: Suðreyjar) compose a widespread and diverse archipelago off the west coast of mainland Scotland. There are two main groups: the Inner and Outer Hebrides. These islands have a long history of occupation dating back to the Mesolithic, and the culture of the residents has been affected by the successive influences of Celtic, Norse, and English-speaking peoples. This diversity is reflected in the names given to the islands, which are derived from the languages that have been spoken there in historic and perhaps prehistoric times. The Hebrides
Hebrides
are the source of much of Scottish Gaelic literature
Scottish Gaelic literature
and Gaelic music
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Iceland
Iceland
Iceland
(/ˈaɪslənd/ ( listen); Icelandic: Ísland, pronounced [ˈistlant])[7] is a Nordic island country in the North Atlantic, with a population of 348,580 and an area of 103,000 km2 (40,000 sq mi), making it the most sparsely populated country in Europe.[8] The capital and largest city is Reykjavík. Reykjavík
Reykjavík
and the surrounding areas in the southwest of the country are home to over two-thirds of the population. Iceland
Iceland
is volcanically and geologically active. The interior consists of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains, and glaciers, while many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland
Iceland
is warmed by the Gulf Stream
Gulf Stream
and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic
Arctic
Circle
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New Zealand
New Zealand
New Zealand
(/njuːˈziːlənd/ ( listen); Māori: Aotearoa [aɔˈtɛaɾɔa]) is an island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island
North Island
(Te Ika-a-Māui), and the South Island
South Island
(Te Waipounamu)—and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand
New Zealand
is situated some 1,500 kilometres (900 mi) east of Australia
Australia
across the Tasman Sea
Tasman Sea
and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand
New Zealand
developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal and plant life
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Stroke
Stroke
Stroke
is a medical condition in which poor blood flow to the brain results in cell death.[4] There are two main types of stroke: ischemic, due to lack of blood flow, and hemorrhagic, due to bleeding.[4] They result in part of the brain not functioning properly.[4] Signs and symptoms of a stroke may include an inability to move or feel on one side of the body, problems understanding or speaking, feeling like the world is spinning, or loss of vision to one side.[1][2] Signs and symptoms often appear soon after the stroke has occurred.[2] If symptoms last less than one or two hours it is known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or m
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Josiah Wedgewood
Josiah Wedgwood (12 July 1730 – 3 January 1795) was an English potter and entrepreneur. He founded the Wedgwood company
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Robert Brown (Scottish Botanist From Montrose)
Robert Brown FRSE FRS FLS MWS (21 December 1773 – 10 June 1858) was a Scottish botanist and palaeobotanist who made important contributions to botany largely through his pioneering use of the microscope. His contributions include one of the earliest detailed descriptions of the cell nucleus and cytoplasmic streaming; the observation of Brownian motion; early work on plant pollination and fertilisation, including being the first to recognise the fundamental difference between gymnosperms and angiosperms; and some of the earliest studies in palynology
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Herbarium
A herbarium (plural: herbaria) is a collection of preserved plant specimens and associated data used for scientific study.[1] The term can also refer to the building or room where the specimens are housed, or to the scientific institute that not only stores but uses them for research. The specimens may be whole plants or plant parts; these will usually be in dried form mounted on a sheet of paper but, depending upon the material, may also be stored in boxes or kept in alcohol or other preservative.[2] The specimens in a herbarium are often used as reference material in describing plant taxa; some specimens may be types. The same term is often used in mycology to describe an equivalent collection of preserved fungi, otherwise known as a fungarium.[3] A xylarium is a herbarium specialising in specimens of wood.[4] The term hortorium (as in the
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Great Barrier Reef
The Great Barrier Reef
The Great Barrier Reef
is the world's largest coral reef system[1][2] composed of over 2,900 individual reefs[3] and 900 islands stretching for over 2,300 kilometres (1,400 mi) over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (133,000 sq mi).[4][5] The reef is located in the Coral
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of AustraliaFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Advance Australia
Australia
Fair"[N 1]Capital Canberra 35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest city SydneyNational language English[N 2]DemonymAustralian Aussie
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HM Bark Endeavour
Endeavour or endeavor may refer to:Contents1 Arts, entertainment 2 Awards 3 Computing and technology 4 Education 5 Man-made structures 6 Media 7 Motor vehicles 8 Organizations 9 Places 10 Transport10.1 Ships 10.2 Space vehicles 10.3 Trains11 Other 12 See alsoArts, entertainment[edit]Endeavor, a strategy game from Z-Man Games Endeavors, a rock band from Montreal, Canada Endeavour Entertainment, a home media company responsible for releasing Thomas & Friends videos in New Zealand Endeavour Morse, central character of the Inspector Morse novels by Colin Dexter Endeavour (TV series), a television drama adapted from characters in Colin Dexter's novels Endeavour, a spacecraft from Rendezvous with Rama
Rendezvous with Rama
by Arthur C. Clarke Endeavour, an Alliance Strike carrier from Starlancer H.M.S
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Pacific Ocean
The Pacific Ocean
Ocean
is the largest and deepest of Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic Ocean
Arctic Ocean
in the north to the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
(or, depending on definition, to Antarctica) in the south and is bounded by Asia
Asia
and Australia
Australia
in the west and the Americas
Americas
in the east. At 165,250,000 square kilometers (63,800,000 square miles) in area (as defined with an Antarctic
Antarctic
southern border), this largest division of the World Ocean—and, in turn, the hydrosphere—covers about 46% of Earth's water surface and about one-third of its total surface area, making it larger than all of Earth's land area combined.[1] Both the center of the Water Hemisphere and the Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
are in the Pacific Ocean
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Brookwood Cemetery
Woking
Woking
Necropolis and Mausoleum Limited, subsidiary of Woking
Woking
Borough Council (2014–present) [3] Diane Holliday (2012–2014)[4] Erkin Güney (2006–2012)[5] Ramadan Güney
Ramadan Güney
(1985–2006)[6] Mr D. J. T. Dally (?–1985)[7] was previously London
London
Necropolis CompanySize 500 acres (202 ha)No. of interments 235,000Website Brookwood CemeteryBrookwood Cemetery, also known as the London
London
Necropolis, is a burial ground in Brookwood, Surrey, England. It is the largest cemetery in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and one of the largest in Europe
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