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Dangun
Dangun
Dangun
(단군; 檀君; [tan.ɡun]) or Dangun
Dangun
Wanggeom (단군왕검; 檀君王儉; [tan.ɡun waŋ.ɡʌm]) was the legendary founder of Gojoseon, the first ever Korean kingdom, around present-day Liaoning, Manchuria, and the northern part of the Korean Peninsula. He is said to be the "grandson of heaven" and "son of a bear", and to have founded the kingdom in 2333 BC
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History Of Science And Technology In Korea
Like most other regions in the world, science and technology in Korea has experienced periods of intense growth as well as long periods of stagnation.Contents1 Prehistory 2 Three Kingdoms Period 3 Goryeo
Goryeo
Dynasty 4 Joseon
Joseon
Dynasty4.1 15th century 4.2 16th-19th century5 Modern period5.1 North Korea 5.2 South Korea6 See also 7 Notes 8 Works citedPrehistory[edit] At the end of the Palaeolithic, people of the Korean Peninsula adopted microlithic stone tool technology, a highly efficient and useful way of making and maintaining a flexible prehistoric toolkit. The Palaeolithic
Palaeolithic
also marks the beginning of a long period of plant and human interaction in which people undoubtedly adopted a number of wild plants for medicinal use. Archaeological
Archaeological
evidence from Gosan-ri in Jeju-do
Jeju-do
indicates that pottery was first made c
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Goryeo
Gaegyeong (919–1232, 1270–1390, 1391-1392) Ganghwa (1232–1270) Namgyeong (1390-1391)Languages Middle KoreanReligion Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shamanism (Sindo)Government MonarchyKing •  918–943 Taejo (first) •  949–975 Gwangjong •  981–997 Seongjong •  1046–1083 Munjong •  1351–1374 Gongmin •  1389–1392 Gongyang (last)Military regime leader •  1170-1174 Yi Ui-bang (first) •  1174–1179 Jeong Jung-bu •  1196–1219 Choe Chung-heon •  1270 Im Yu-mu (last)History • 
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Three Kingdoms Of Korea
The concept of the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
of Korea (Hangul: 삼국시대) refers to the three kingdoms of Baekje
Baekje
(백제), Silla
Silla
(신라) and Goguryeo
Goguryeo
(고구려). Goguryeo
Goguryeo
was later known as Goryeo
Goryeo
(고려), from which the modern name Korea is derived. The Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period was defined as being from 57 BC to 668 AD (but there existed about 78 tribal states in the southern region of Korean peninsula and relatively big states like Okjeo, Buyeo, and Dongye
Dongye
in its northern part and Manchuria). The three kingdoms occupied the entire Korean Peninsula
Korean Peninsula
and most of Manchuria, located in present-day China
China
and Russia
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Baekje
Baekje
Baekje
(백제; 百濟; [pɛk̚.t͈ɕe]; 18 BC[1] – 660 AD) was a kingdom located in southwest Korea. It was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo
Goguryeo
and Silla. Baekje
Baekje
was founded by Onjo, the third son of Goguryeo's founder Jumong and So Seo-no, at Wiryeseong
Wiryeseong
(present-day southern Seoul). Baekje, like Goguryeo, claimed to succeed Buyeo, a state established in present-day Manchuria
Manchuria
around the time of Gojoseon's fall. Baekje
Baekje
alternately battled and allied with Goguryeo
Goguryeo
and Silla
Silla
as the three kingdoms expanded control over the peninsula
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Silla
Silla
Silla
(57 BC[note 1] – 935 AD) (Hangul: 신라; Hanja: 新羅; RR:  Silla
Silla
Korean pronunciation: [ɕil.la]) was a kingdom located in southern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula. Silla, along with Baekje
Baekje
and Goguryeo, formed the Three Kingdoms of Korea. Founded by Hyeokgeose of Silla, the dynasty was ruled by the Gyeongju Gim (Kim) (김, 金) clan for most of its 992-year history. It began as a chiefdom in the Samhan
Samhan
confederacies, once allied with China, until it eventually conquered the other two kingdoms, Baekje
Baekje
in 660 and Goguryeo
Goguryeo
in 668. Thereafter, Later Silla
Later Silla
occupied most of the Korean Peninsula, while the northern part re-emerged as Balhae, a successor-state of Goguryeo
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Gaya Confederacy
Gaya (Hangul: 가야; Hanja: 加倻; RR: Gaya, Korean pronunciation: [ka.ja]) was a confederacy of territorial polities in the Nakdong River
Nakdong River
basin of southern Korea,[1] growing out of the Byeonhan confederacy
Byeonhan confederacy
of the Samhan
Samhan
period. The traditional period used by historians for Gaya chronology is AD 42–532. According to archaeological evidence in the third and fourth centuries some of the city-states of Byeonhan evolved into the Gaya confederacy, which was later annexed by Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. The individual polities that made up the Gaya confederacy have been characterized as small city-states.[2] The material culture remains of Gaya culture mainly consist of burials and their contents of mortuary goods that have been excavated by archaeologists
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North–South States Period
North–South States Period
North–South States Period
(698–926 CE) is the period in Korean history when Later Silla
Silla
and Balhae
Balhae
coexisted in the south and north of the peninsula, respectively.[1][2]Contents1 Later Silla 2 Balhae 3 Language 4 See also 5 ReferencesLater Silla[edit] Main article: Later Silla After the unification wars, the Tang Dynasty
Tang Dynasty
established territories in the former Goguryeo, and began to administer and establish communities in Baekje. Silla
Silla
attacked the Chinese in Baekje
Baekje
and northern Korea in 671. The Tang Dynasty
Tang Dynasty
then invaded Silla
Silla
in 674 but Silla
Silla
defeated the Tang army in the north
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Later Silla
Later Silla
Silla
(668–935, Hangul: 후신라; Hanja: 後新羅; RR: Husilla, Korean pronunciation: [huː.ɕil.la]) or Unified Silla
Silla
(Hangul: 통일신라; Hanja: 統一新羅, Korean pronunciation: [tʰoːŋ.il.ɕil.la]) is the name often applied to the Korean kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after it conquered Baekje
Baekje
and Goguryeo
Goguryeo
in the 7th century, unifying the central and southern regions of the Korean peninsula. Later Silla
Silla
was a prosperous and wealthy country,[2] and its metropolitan capital of Seorabeol
Seorabeol
(modern name Gyeongju)[3] was the fourth-largest city in the world at the time.[4][5][6][7] During its heyday, the country contested with Balhae, a Goguryeo–Mohe kingdom, to the north for supremacy in the region
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Later Three Kingdoms
Kingdom
Kingdom
may refer to:Contents1 Monarchy 2 Taxonomy 3 Arts and media3.1 Television 3.2 Music 3.3 Other media4 People 5 Other 6 See alsoMonarchy[edit] Further information: List of kingdoms A type of monarchy:A realm ruled bya king a queen regnantTaxonomy[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(taxonomy), a category in biological taxonomyArts and media[edit] Television[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(UK TV series), a 2007 British television drama starring Stephen Fry Kingdom
Kingdom
(U.S
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Later Baekje
Hubaekje or Later Baekje
Baekje
(Hangul: 후백제; Hanja: 後百濟; RR: Hubekje, Korean pronunciation: [hu.bɛk̚.t͈ɕe]) was one of the Later Three Kingdoms of Korea, along with Hugoguryeo and Silla. It was officially founded by the disaffected Silla
Silla
general Gyeon Hwon in 900, and fell to Wang Geon's Goryeo
Goryeo
army in 936. Its capital was at Jeonju, in present-day North Jeolla
North Jeolla
province
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Taebong
Taebong
Taebong
(Hangul: 태봉; Hanja: 泰封; RR: Tebong; Korean pronunciation: [tʰɛ.boŋ]) was a state established by Gung Ye
Gung Ye
(hanja: 弓裔) on the Korean Peninsula
Korean Peninsula
in 901 during the Later Three Kingdoms.Contents1 Name 2 History 3 See also 4 ReferencesName[edit] The state's initial name was Goryeo, after the official name of Goguryeo, a previous state in Manchuria
Manchuria
and the northern Korean Peninsula, from the 5th century. Gung Ye
Gung Ye
changed the state's name to Majin in 904, and eventually to Taebong
Taebong
in 911
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Joseon
The Joseon
Joseon
dynasty (also transcribed as Chosŏn or Chosun, Korean: 조선; also known as Joseon
Joseon
of the House of Yi, Korean: 리조조선; officially the Kingdom of Great Joseon, Korean: 대조선국) was a Korean dynastic kingdom that lasted for approximately five centuries. It was founded by Yi Seong-gye
Yi Seong-gye
in July 1392 and was replaced by the Korean Empire
Korean Empire
in October 1897.[5] It was founded following the aftermath of the overthrow of Goryeo
Goryeo
in what is today the city of Kaesong. Early on, Korea
Korea
was retitled and the capital was relocated to modern-day Seoul. The kingdom's northernmost borders were expanded to the natural boundaries at the rivers of Amnok and Tuman through the subjugation of the Jurchens
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Hangul
Hangul
Hangul
(/ˈhɑːnˌɡuːl/ HAHN-gool;[1] from Korean hangeul 한글 [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) is the Korean alphabet. It has been used to write the Korean language
Korean language
since its creation in the 15th century under Sejong the Great.[2][3] It is the official writing system of South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County
Changbai Korean Autonomous County
in Jilin
Jilin
Province, China. It is sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language
Cia-Cia language
spoken near the town of Bau-Bau, Indonesia. The alphabet consists of 19 consonants and 21 vowels. Hangul
Hangul
letters are grouped into syllabic blocks, vertically and horizontally
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Korean Empire
The Great Korean Empire
Empire
was proclaimed in October 1897, after the Donghak Peasant Revolution
Donghak Peasant Revolution
of 1894 to 1895 and Gabo Reforms that swept the country from 1894 to 1896. From 1905 onward, Korea became a protectorate of Japan and in August 1910, the Korean Peninsula was annexed outright by Japan, bringing the Korean Empire
Empire
and its monarchy to an end and beginning 35 years of Japanese colonial rule in Korea. Emperor Gojong oversaw the partial modernization of the military, economy, land system, education system and various industries
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Korea Under Japanese Rule
Korea under Japanese rule
Korea under Japanese rule
began with the end of the short-lived Korean Empire in 1910 and ended at the conclusion of World War II
World War II
in 1945. Japanese rule of Korea was the outcome of a process that began with the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1876, whereby a complex coalition of the Meiji government, military, and business officials sought to integrate Korea both politically and economically into the Empire of Japan. A major stepping-stone towards the Japanese occupation of Korea was the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1905, in which the then- Korean Empire
Korean Empire
was declared a protectorate of Japan. The annexation of Korea by Japan
Japan
was set up in the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910, which was never actually signed by the Korean Regent, Gojong.[6][7][8] Imperial Japanese rule over Korea ended in 1945, when U.S. and Soviet forces captured the peninsula
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